Oakland Raiders

Sports Uncovered Podcast: How to listen to episode on Barret Robbins' Super Bowl disappearance

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NBC Sports

Sports Uncovered Podcast: How to listen to episode on Barret Robbins' Super Bowl disappearance

Had the Eagles won the 2002 NFC Championship Game, they would've faced the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XXXVII, and possibly rewritten franchise history.

It also may have changed the life of former Oakland Raiders center Barret Robbins, the Pro Bowl center who spent the day before the Super Bowl bar-hopping and drinking before ultimately missing the game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. It stands as one of the strangest Super Bowl stories of all-time.

In the fifth episode of NBC Sports' "Sports Uncovered" podcast series, "The Mysterious Disappearance that Changed a Super Bowl", NBC Sports Bay Area takes a deep dive into Robbins' story, from his early diagnosis with depression in college to the self-destructive day of drinking that took him all the way into Mexico.

The episode features interviews with Robbins' former teammates like Barry Sims, former Raiders executives like Bruce Allen, and more.

The episode releases Thursday, July 9. You can listen to this episode and the entire "Sports Uncovered" series by subscribing for free wherever you listen to podcasts.

To catch every episode, be sure to subscribe to "Sports Uncovered" and have every episode automatically downloaded to your phone. Sports Uncovered is available on the MyTeams app and on every major podcasting platform: Apple, Google Podcast, iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, and TuneIn

Listen and subscribe to the "Sports Uncovered" podcast:

Josh Jacobs' injury open the door for Miles Sanders to make history

Josh Jacobs' injury open the door for Miles Sanders to make history

The Raiders on Saturday ruled running back Josh Jacobs out for Sunday’s game against the Broncos, which opens the door for Miles Sanders to become the first Eagle in 66 years to lead NFL rookies in scrimmage yards.

Jacobs, who will be sidelined because of a shoulder injury and illness, will finish the season with 1,316 yards. Sanders is just 40 yards back with 1,276 yards going into the Eagles’ finale against the Giants Sunday at the Meadowlands.

Sanders has 45 fewer touches than Jacobs and is averaging nearly a yard more per touch (5.9 to 5.0). Jacobs has seven TDs, one more than Sanders.

No other NFL rookie has more than 987 scrimmage yards, so if Sanders totals 41 combined rushing and receiving yards he’ll be the 2019 NFL rookie yardage leader … unless someone like A.J. Brown or David Montgomery gains well over 300 yards. Not likely.

As recently as Week 11, Jacobs led Sanders by 329 scrimmage yards. But with Jacobs missing two of the Raiders’ last three games, Sanders closed the gap, thanks in large part to to huge games against the Redskins (172 yards) and Cowboys (156 yards).

Sanders already has the most scrimmage yards by an Eagles running back since LeSean McCoy had 1,474 in 2014, his last season with the Eagles.

The three leading candidates for NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year are Sanders, Jacobs and Cards quarterback Kyler Murray, the No. 1 overall pick in this year's draft. Murray, who is questionable for the Cards' finale against the Rams because of a hamstring injury, has thrown for 3,397 yards and rushed for 544 yards with 18 TD passes and 10 interceptions.

The last Eagle to lead NFL rookies in scrimmage yards was Don “Heartbeat” Johnson in 1953.

Johnson was a third-round pick out of Cal and had 439 rushing yards (and a 5.3 average) and 12 catches for 227 more yards as a rookie for 666 net yards. Gern Nagler of the Cards was second with 610.

Because of a serious knee injury, Johnson only played eight more games in his brief NFL career and netted just 37 more yards. 

The only other Eagles to win the rookie scrimmage yards title are Don Looney in 1940 and Mel Bleeker in 1944.

Looney led the NFL with 58 catches and 707 yards as a rookie in 1940 — still fourth-most in Eagles history. He had minus-four yards rushing for a total of 703 yards. Banks McFadden of the Brooklyn Dodgers was second with 508 yards.

Bleeker in 1944 netted 315 yards rushing and 299 receiving (on just eight catches). His 614 net scrimmage yards were 21 more than runner-up Bob Margarita of the Bears.

 

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Before you ask ... no, Antonio Brown isn't worth it for the Eagles

Before you ask ... no, Antonio Brown isn't worth it for the Eagles

Updated: Friday, Sept. 20, 5:55 p.m.: Antonio Brown has been released by the Patriots. What we wrote below still stands.

No. Before you ask, no. No, no, no. No, no, no.

No.

The Raiders released Antonio Brown on Saturday after quite a saga this summer in which he screwed up his feet, threw a hissy fit about his helmet, missed practices, got fined, posted about his fine on social media, threatened to hit the GM, apologized, posted a phone call with his head coach and then asked for his release, which the Raiders granted.

So before you even ask, no. The Eagles should not be interested. Not at all.

The Eagles have a strong locker room culture they care about. And they think that  locker room culture can absorb just about anything. But it can’t absorb everything.

This would be like having a standard pair of handcuffs and expecting them to hold a monster. Ain’t gonna work.

And the Eagles care about that culture so much they wouldn’t risk it to bring in someone who could completely decimate everything like he just did in Oakland even before he hot-air-ballooned his way into training camp. Before they bring in anyone, the Eagles assess the risk. They shouldn’t need to assess this one too long. It’s not worth it. Not even for a Hall of Fame-caliber player.

Besides all that, the Eagles don’t need a receiver. They are four deep with Alshon Jeffery, DeSean Jackson, Nelson Agholor and JJ Arcega-Whiteside. Heck, the only way this offense is going to work this year is if all their skill players buy in and don’t let their egos get in the way. At this point, Brown is ego come to life.

Really, I’d question any team that brings in Brown right now. The upside could be great; he’s a tremendous player. But chemistry is important too. That’s how the Eagles won their Super Bowl in 2017, a bunch of guys buying in, working toward a common goal.

Antonio Brown is all about himself.

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