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How will NFL's new national anthem policy affect Eagles?

How will NFL's new national anthem policy affect Eagles?

The NFL has adopted a new policy it hopes will eliminate on-field protests during the national anthem. 

Sparked by Colin Kaepernick and then various other players in the NFL, demonstrations during the anthem had popped up in many cities over the last couple of NFL seasons. It also included the Eagles as Malcolm Jenkins led the charge of demonstrating against social injustice in an attempt to further discussion about racism in the United States. 

At one point before last season, Jenkins questioned whether or not he would continue his protest, not because he didn’t believe in his cause, but because he was concerned the focus was being placed on the demonstration rather than the reason for it. 

This policy attempts to eliminate demonstrations, seemingly without addressing the impetus for them. 

“It was unfortunate that on-field protests created a false perception among many that thousands of NFL players were patriotic,” NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement released by the league. “This is not and was never the case. 

“This season, all league and team personnel shall stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem. Personnel who choose to not stand for the Anthem may stay in the locker room until after the Anthem has been performed.” 

Here are the specifics of the policy: 

1. All team and league personnel on the field shall stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem.

2. The Game Operations Manual will be revised to remove the requirement that all players be on the field for the Anthem.

3. Personnel who choose not to stand for the Anthem may stay in the locker room or in a similar location off the field until after the Anthem has been performed.

4. A club will be fined by the League if its personnel are on the field and do not stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem.

5. Each club may develop its own work rules, consistent with the above principles, regarding its personnel who do not stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem.

6. The Commissioner will impose appropriate discipline on league personnel who do not stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem.

So what does this mean for the Eagles? 

Well, the Eagles have traditionally been one of the most socially aware teams in the NFL, with players like Jenkins and Chris Long at the forefront (see reactions to policy). Jenkins is the leader of the Players Coalition. 

During last season, Jenkins discontinued his anthem demonstration of raising his fist after he became encouraged by the NFL’s efforts regarding social injustice. The league pledged $100 million to causes aimed at combatting social injustices. 

This offseason, however, the Eagles traded for Michael Bennett, who sat through the anthem last season as a protest. Bennett has previously said he plans on continuing his protest, which would put the Eagles in an interesting position. 

Based on the new policy, the NFL will not fine individual players, but will fine the team of players who don’t show “respect.” It will then be up to the club to determine the punishment to hand down to that player, if any. Jeff Lurie is considered one of the more socially-forward thinking owners in the league, but this is tricky. The policy was said to be passed unanimously among those who voted -- including Lurie -- but 49ers owner Jed York abstained. 

The Eagles did not immediately have a comment on the NFL’s new policy. Lurie released a statement later Wednesday night (see story).

In the statement from the league, the NFL says the policy was created “in concert” with a commitment to local communities and that the league is dedicated to “continuing our collaboration with players to advance the goals of justice and fairness in all corners of our society.” 

But an NFLPA spokesman said their group was not involved in these discussions. 

NFL Notes: Commissioner Roger Goodell signs 5-year extension

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NFL Notes: Commissioner Roger Goodell signs 5-year extension

NEW YORK -- Roger Goodell has signed a five-year contract extension to remain commissioner of the NFL through 2024.

A memo from the NFL's compensation committee to team owners and obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press confirms that Goodell and committee chairman Arthur Blank, owner of the Atlanta Falcons, have signed the extension.

That extension has been a source of controversy because Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones objected to the process.

All 32 owners approved in May the compensation committee's power to negotiate and sign a deal with Goodell, who replaced Paul Tagliabue in 2006.

Since then, the league's total revenues have more than doubled to over $13 billion (see full story).

Giants: Manning back as starting quarterback
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Two-time Super Bowl MVP Eli Manning is back as the New York Giants' starting quarterback.

A week after being benched by former coach Ben McAdoo, Manning was put back into the starting lineup for Sunday's game against the Dallas Cowboys by interim coach Steve Spagnuolo.

"My gut right now says Eli should be the starter," Spagnuolo said in explaining the move after practice Wednesday.

The 36-year-old Manning was told of the decision on Tuesday. He had walked into Spagnuolo's office on Monday after McAdoo was fired and told the former defensive coordinator that he wanted to start again.

"It's important to play, that's what I love to do," Manning said after practice. "I love to play quarterback and I love to play quarterback for the New York Giants. So that's what I will work on" (see full story).

Chiefs: Team suspends CB Peters 1 game
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Marcus Peters chucked an official's flag into the stands, stalked off the field wearing a smile, then ran back onto it without wearing socks when he realized he hadn't been ejected.

Well, he won't have to worry about socks on Sunday.

Chiefs coach Andy Reid suspended the volatile young cornerback for their game against Oakland after a series of antics that have humiliated not only Peters but the entire organization.

The latest came in last week's loss to the New York Jets, when a late penalty was called and Peters picked up the flag and flung it into the stands . Peters proceeded to leave the field, assuming that he'd been kicked out of the game, and was evidently undressing when he realized his mistake.

So Peters ran back onto the sideline without wearing socks, only to watch the Chiefs' last-ditch drive fall short in a 38-31 loss -- their sixth in the last seven games.

"I've done a lot of thinking and come to the conclusion I'm going to suspend him for this game," Reid said after Wednesday morning's walkthrough. "I'm not going to get into detail on it. I did have the opportunity to talk to Marcus and some of the players, and I've got a good locker room. I fully trust them. We'll be OK there. So that's where I'm at" (see full story).

Steelers: Team rallying around injured Shazier
PITTSBURGH -- Ryan Shazier's locker sat untouched in a corner of the Pittsburgh Steelers locker room Wednesday except for one little piece: his yellow No. 50 practice jersey, which found its way into the hands and over the shoulders of good friend and fellow inside linebacker Vince Williams.

While Williams and the rest of Shazier's teammates tried to go about the business of preparing for a visit from Baltimore on Sunday that could clinch Pittsburgh's third AFC North title in four years, Shazier spent the day being transported from Cincinnati to Pittsburgh to undergo further testing on a spinal injury that left his future murky and his teammates shaken.

"I think it's just weird without 50 here," rookie outside linebacker T.J. Watt said. "He's the heart and soul of this defense. He's the quarterback. It's just different not having him here in meetings and out there in practices. It's weird."

Pittsburgh signed Sean Spence, who spent three seasons with the Steelers after being taken in the third round of the 2012 draft, to fill Shazier's spot on the roster.

Tyler Matakevich could start in Shazier's spot against the Ravens if his aching left shoulder comes around in time.

Jerry Jones goes after Roger Goodell over Ezekiel Elliott suspension

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Jerry Jones goes after Roger Goodell over Ezekiel Elliott suspension

Jerry Jones, the NFL's most outspoken troll, just wants to watch the world burn.

After weeks of talk and escalation, the Cowboys' owner is ready to go to war with Roger Goodell and the league's other owners over Ezekiel Elliott's suspension.

According to an ESPN report, Jones threatened the commissioner on a conference call after Elliott's suspension was announced, saying, "I'm gonna come after you with everything I have. If you think (Patriots owner) Bob Kraft came after you hard, Bob Kraft is a p---y compared to what I'm going to do."

For weeks now, Jones has tried to disrupt talks of a contract extension for Goodell, promoted objectively bad pizza in the name of football, and landed himself in hot water with the other owners. So much so that there has reportedly been talk about removing Jones as the Cowboys' owner.

It's hard to pick a side here. Jones — the long-lost twin of Emperor Palpatine — and Goodell — a man with rulings more inconsistent than Pete Morelli. You don't really want to root for either of them, but it is fun to think about the extremely unlikely chance that Jones loses the Cowboys.