Shizz Alston

Sixers sign and then waive Shizz Alston Jr., Terry Harris for purpose of adding them to Delaware Blue Coats

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Sixers sign and then waive Shizz Alston Jr., Terry Harris for purpose of adding them to Delaware Blue Coats

Updated: 2:27 p.m.

The 2019-20 Delaware Blue Coats are shaping up to be a fascinating team.

The Sixers are signing and then waiving Terry Harris, Shizz Alston Jr., Julian Washburn, Jared Brownridge and Xavier Munford with the purpose of adding them to the Blue Coats. Harris' deal is an Exhibit 9 contract.

Terry Harris is the younger brother of Sixers forward Tobias Harris, whom the team re-signed to a five-year, $180 million contract this summer. Terry played for the Sixers this year in summer league and scored nine points in three games. The 6-foot-6 wing worked out with the Sixers in June and said "it would be a blessing" to play with Tobias for the first time since eighth grade. As a redshirt senior at North Carolina A&T, Terry averaged 8.1 points per game and shot 41.1 percent from three-point range. Outside shooting is his trademark skill.

Alston grew up in Philadelphia and attended The Haverford School before going to Temple, where he played for four years. The point guard had an excellent senior season, leading Temple to a 23-10 record and averaging 19.7 points and 5.0 assists per game. Like Harris, he had a pre-draft workout for the Sixers. Alston played with the Indiana Pacers in summer league and scored 24 points across three contests.

The 6-foot-8 Washburn has 136 career games of experience in the G League, including 38 last season between the Austin Spurs and Memphis Hustle. He signed a two-way contract with the Grizzlies in January and appeared in 18 NBA games last year, averaging 2.2 points and 2.3 rebounds. Washburn was part of the trade between the Grizzlies and Warriors in July involving Andre Iguodala, and was later waived by Golden State.

Brownridge, who played his college ball at Santa Clara, played 49 games (27 starts) with the Blue Coats last season. He led the G-League in threes made with 187.

Munford spent last season with the Milwaukee Bucks G-League affiliate, the Wisconsin Herd. He's also played in China and Spain after his collegiate career at Rhode Island ended.

In addition to Washburn, Alston, Harris, Brownridge and Munford, 7-foot-3 Christ Koumadje, Saint Joseph's product Isaiah Miles and Haywood Highsmith are candidates for the Blue Coats this season. Those three players were part of the Sixers' preseason roster and will be waived (see story).

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'Elite scorer' Carsen Edwards reminded of dominant performance vs. Villanova before pre-draft workout with Sixers

'Elite scorer' Carsen Edwards reminded of dominant performance vs. Villanova before pre-draft workout with Sixers

CAMDEN, N.J. — Carsen Edwards had a day to kill before his pre-draft workout Wednesday with the Sixers. The avid basketball fans of Philadelphia made sure one of his finest performances at Purdue, his 42-point game against Villanova this March in the NCAA Tournament, was fresh in his mind.

“I went into Chipotle and two people mentioned it to me,” he said. “I was like, ‘Yeah, that’s me.’ It’s cool, though. It was a blessing to be able to play that way and be on that stage doing the things I did. And I’m just continuing to work to be the best player I can be.”

Edwards averaged 24.3 points per game as a junior and nearly 35 in the NCAA Tournament during Purdue’s run to the Elite Eight. His scoring credentials are such that his height, or lack thereof, doesn’t dull the excitement about his NBA prospects. Edwards measured in at 6-foot and a quarter inch at the NBA Draft Combine — with shoes on. From a physical standpoint, Edwards’ height is mitigated by his strong 200-pound frame, with his massive quads a feature that stand out in person, and his 6-foot-6 wingspan.

Senior vice president of personnel Marc Eversley called Edwards an "elite scorer" and emphasized that the Sixers see Edwards as more than his physical traits.

“His height is not as much of a deterrent in terms of potentially fitting with us.” Eversely said. “I wouldn’t get caught up on the height thing. He’s got a big heart, plays hard, competes. And again, he can really, really shoot the ball. I think that’s going to be kind of his pathway into the league.”

Edwards agreed with Eversley’s assessment when looking specifically at how he’d fit with the Sixers. He shot 35.5 percent from three-point range on 10.6 attempts per game last season, many of them with a very high degree of difficulty.

“I feel like I can fit well with just being off the ball. Being able to shoot. Like I said, getting back to defense, defending the opposing team’s guard  — which is easier said than done  — but just making an impact on that," Edwards said. "Running the floor, getting to the corner, being ready to shoot.”

While most of the focus naturally falls on Edwards’ scoring, he said after the workout that he wasn’t satisfied with his defensive play.

“Just in my opinion, I’m honest with myself and I feel I could’ve defended a little better, made shots tougher for people I was guarding,” he said. “But for the most part, I gave everything, I competed, and I appreciate them bringing me in and having this opportunity.”

After workouts with Indiana, Utah, Brooklyn and the Sixers, Edwards said he has several more to come before the draft, including with Milwaukee, Boston and Oklahoma City. All the teams he listed have selections between No. 22 and No. 30.

Local ties 

The other five participants in Wednesday’s workout were Jonathan Kasibabu from Fairfield, Quinndary Weatherspoon from Mississippi State, Charles Matthews from Michigan, CJ Massinburg from Buffalo and Eric Carter from Delaware. 

Carter, a native of Jackson, New Jersey, averaged 15.8 points and 9.7 rebounds as a redshirt senior for the Blue Hens. He said he could envision himself as an “energy guy” and stretch four with the Sixers. Although the 6-foot-9 Carter took only seven threes in his college career, his free-throw percentage and overall production improved each season at Delaware. If the Sixers believe he can keep growing, Carter might be a candidate to continue his career in Delaware, with the Blue Coats. 

As you might expect, Carter was a fan of the Sixers growing up … and the Knicks. 

“No, I’m not a bandwagoner,” he said. “I mean, I like both. A.I. was my favorite growing up, so I was always on the Sixers. It’s just exciting.”

Another local player will work out for the Sixers on Thursday in Temple’s Shizz Alston Jr., with Harry Froling, Donta Hall, Jaylen Hoard, Josh Perkins and Dylan Windler the other participants. Windler, who shot 42.9 percent from three on 7.1 attempts per game as a senior at Belmont, could interest the Sixers at No. 24, or with one of their two early second-round picks (33 and 34). 

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The Fran Dunphy era ends as Temple falls to Belmont in First Four of NCAA Tournament

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The Fran Dunphy era ends as Temple falls to Belmont in First Four of NCAA Tournament

Updated: 1:31 a.m. 

DAYTON, Ohio — A few seconds were still left on the clock when Fran Dunphy headed to midcourt for his final postgame handshake, the outcome long decided. Belmont was simply too much for his Owls.

Nobody else in the NCAA Tournament is excited to face their efficient offense, either.

Kevin McClain scored 29 points and led the decisive second-half run as Belmont got its first NCAA Tournament win, pulling away to an 81-70 victory Tuesday night and ending Dunphy's career in the First Four.

The 11th-seeded Bruins (27-5) play Maryland on Thursday in the East Region.

"We belong in this tournament," said McClain, who finished two points shy of his career high. "You can see that."

Belmont got an at-large bid after losing to Murray State in the Ohio Valley Conference Tournament title game. The Bruins showed the selection committee's faith was not misplaced, getting the breakthrough win on their eighth try.

"I think that they can play in this atmosphere and this is important," coach Rick Byrd said. "I didn't think many times we played well, or knew what we were in offensively, but they found a way to win. And you never play perfect, and I think they've got some toughness about them."

The loss sent Temple (23-10) into a transition. Dunphy is retiring after his 13th season at Temple, where he replaced John Chaney. Dunphy previously coached 17 seasons at Penn.

"The game of basketball has given me way more than I have given to it," Dunphy said.

He was hoping to coach another day, but Belmont's high-scoring offense pulled away at the end. Senior guard Shizz Alston Jr. led the Owls with 21 points.

"That team is smart," Alston said. "They only do what they're good at."

The Bruins entered the tournament second in the nation at 87.4 points per game. The Owls' aim was to slow the high-percentage offense just enough to give themselves a chance. Temple hung in during a first half that featured five lead changes and ended with Belmont ahead 37-31.

The Bruins pushed their lead to 11 points by hitting their first two shots in the second half. Alston, who led the American Athletic Conference at 19.7 points per game, hit three 3-pointers as the Owls surged ahead 50-46. Alston has been the Owls' catalyst, scoring at least 20 points in each of his last nine games.

McClain led a 16-3 run that put Belmont ahead to stay. McClain finished two points shy of his career high.

The Bruins' balanced offense had more than enough even though leading scorer Dylan Windler was held to five points on 2-of-7 shooting, matching his season low. Windler came in averaging 21.4 points.

Big picture 
Temple: Former Owls star Aaron McKie takes over for Dunphy. McKie is an assistant on Dunphy's staff. The Owls haven't won an NCAA Tournament game since 2013, when they beat N.C. State at Dayton before losing in the second round. They went 2-8 in eight appearances under Dunphy.

Belmont: The Bruins got only the second at-large NCAA Tournament bid in Ohio Valley Conference history, along with Middle Tennessee in 1987. They'd dropped their seven appearances when they had automatic bids.

Tourney history 
Temple's last NCAA Tournament win was in 2013 over N.C. State in Dayton. The Owls are 33-33 all-time in the tournament.

Belmont is making its eighth NCAA appearance since 2006. Its closest previous brush with a victory was a one-point loss to Duke in 2008.

Moose tracks
Six-foot-11 freshman center Nick Muszynski missed the OVC title game with a sprained left ankle, injured the previous game. Muszynski, whose nickname is Moose, started Tuesday and had 16 points and four rebounds. He wore a protective boot after the game.

"I thought he played terrific," Byrd said. "We just didn't know what we were going to get. Frankly, yesterday in practice he didn't look very good at all. But he really showed a lot today."

Philly fewer 
Philadelphia's Big 5 rivalry lost two of its longtime coaches Tuesday. In addition to Dunphy heading into retirement, Saint Joseph's fired Phil Martelli after his 24th season.

No stage fright 
The crowd at University of Dayton Arena was 11,874, the second-largest Belmont has played in front of this season. The high was 14,804 at Mackey Arena on Dec. 29, when Belmont lost to Purdue 73-62.

Up next 
Belmont heads to Jacksonville, Florida, for its game against Maryland.