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Sixers Twitter has good laugh at Bucks owner throwing shade at The Process

Sixers Twitter has good laugh at Bucks owner throwing shade at The Process

It's a joyous time for Process Trusters.

That's because the fruits of the Process Tree that Sam Hinkie planted the seeds for appear to be blooming this week. Bryan Colangelo is using the assets that Hinkie helped put in place to go out and get the No. 1 pick in the upcoming draft, presumably Markelle Fultz.

That's a pretty nice get. And when you put Fultz alongside other Process originals like Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons, and Dario Saric, the Process seems to be heading in the right direction.

That's why it seems a bit curious for the owner of the Milwaukee Bucks, Wes Edens, to be calling out the Philly Process right now.

This line came today when the Bucks introduced Jon Horst as the team's new general manager, which is fine. I'm sure he's a competent and nice guy.

The Sixers had some fun with it though.

Edens was asked at the Horst introductory press conference about what he learned from the process of hiring Horst as GM.

"The guys in Philly like to talk about the process an awful lot, I'd rather talk about the results. I feel really good about the results on this. You can have your process but I mean... process may look like it's a little bit sloppy but at the end of the day it's the result that matters. We got the right guy for the job. There's not a lot of hand wringing about what we could have done diferently."

Just as a quick reminder, the Bucks got knocked out of the 2017 NBA playoffs in the first round and last won an NBA championship in 1971. So, the results haven't exactly been worth bragging about.

Yes, they do have Giannis Antetokounmpo which is enviable but I'm not sure what else the Bucks have to brag about. Not that either team has any real on-court success to brag about lately. But The Process appears to moving along just nicely.

Sixers fans enjoyed the Twitter clapback.

Terrell Owens is back in the game ... the video game

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Madden

Terrell Owens is back in the game ... the video game

Soon-to-be Hall of Famer Terrell Owens is back in the game. 

The video game. 

The once-superstar receiver is the cover boy of the new Madden NFL 19: Hall of Fame Edition video game. But get this … he’s dressed in Cowboys garb. 

TO spent three years in Dallas before wearing out his welcome and was good in Big D, putting up three consecutive 1,000-yard seasons, but is most known for crying about Tony Romo (his quarterback) while with the ‘Boys. 

While players don’t go into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as members of any specific team, if they did, Owens would be a 49er. He spent eight seasons in San Francisco and became a great player there. 

Of course, after he left San Francisco, he had his short stint in Philadelphia, which was as tumultuous as it was productive. From there came his three seasons in Dallas, followed by one in Buffalo, one in Cincinnati and comeback rumors ever since. 

Owens, 44, probably thinks he can still play in the NFL. Playing in the video game will have to suffice. 

Eagles wise to reject Nick Foles trade offer ... for now

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AP Images

Eagles wise to reject Nick Foles trade offer ... for now

Nick Foles for the 35th overall pick in the draft? A lot of Eagles fans would’ve probably pulled the trigger on that trade.

We know now the Eagles, wisely, did not.

Technically, it was Foles who shunned the Cleveland Browns’ overtures. According to an NFL.com report, the Eagles approached the Super Bowl MVP in March about the Browns’ offer of a second-round choice in the 2018 draft. He would rather remain a backup quarterback in Philadelphia than start for the league’s most pitiful franchise.

The Eagles respected his wishes. It wasn’t what was best for Foles. He earned that deference.

But it wasn’t what was best for the Eagles, either.

Never mind the organization owed it to Foles to ask his feelings about a possible trade, or that dumping him off in Cleveland against his wishes would’ve been unpopular with fans and around the league. Those were good reasons to turn down the offer. Just not necessarily the only reasons.

There was no need for the Eagles to settle for a second-round pick at that point in time, and all the rationale in the world says to wait and see what transpires.

Carson Wentz’s ongoing recovery from a torn ACL is the obvious. As confident as Wentz is he’ll be under center for the Eagles in Week 1, that remains to be seen. His progress was an even greater unknown when the offer was made over two months ago.

Was No. 35 enough to gamble on Wentz’s getting healthy in time for the 2018 season, amid the Eagles’ bid to repeat?

Maybe, maybe not – fortunately, the Eagles didn’t have to decide to trade Foles right then and there.

If recent history has told us anything, it’s not only do the Eagles have the option to trade Foles at a later date, but his value could increase based on demand.

The Eagles would know. Fans couldn’t believe the front office didn’t ship a disgruntled Sam Bradford to the Broncos for a second-round pick after making the move to draft Wentz in 2016. A few months later, almost everybody was amazed when Bradford was dealt to the Vikings for a first and a fourth.

Circumstances changed. The Vikings were a viable contender that, due to an injury, suddenly became desperate for an established quarterback just as the regular season was about to begin.

There’s no telling which teams might have interest in Foles between now and the mid-season trade deadline, or what price they might be willing to pay. And the Eagles were never going to find out had they shipped him out for the first semi-decent package that was floated their way.

The absolute worst-case scenario now is Foles sticks with the Eagles all this season, is never called upon to play a meaningful snap, then opts out of his contract and becomes a free agent next year.

Yet, even in that scenario, the reigning Super Bowl champions had the best insurance policy in the NFL, for a relatively modest price at $8 million against the salary cap, and the league eventually awards the team a compensatory draft pick after his departure. Along the way, the Eagles simultaneously get to do right by Foles and engender positive vibes among fans and around the league.

The Eagles could’ve used the cap space and another second-round pick this year, but they were better off keeping Foles.

For now, at least.