Redskins

AP Source: Reid, Chiefs nearing deal to be coach

201212311017370617407-p2.jpeg

AP Source: Reid, Chiefs nearing deal to be coach

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) Andy Reid and the Kansas City Chiefs should be quite familiar by now.

The two sides spent much of Thursday in negotiations for Reid to become the Chiefs' coach, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to discuss the situation.

The discussions followed nine hours of talks Wednesday that went well enough that Reid canceled plans to interview for other openings, the person told the AP. It was unclear which details were preventing the two sides from reaching an agreement.

The Philadelphia Eagles fired Reid after 14 seasons on Monday, the same day the Chiefs parted ways with coach Romeo Crennel after the worst season in franchise history.

The search for Crennel's replacement has been led by Chiefs chairman Clark Hunt, who intends to take on more responsibility in the day-to-day operation of the franchise. Also on hand was team president Mark Donovan, who has a connection to Reid after spending six seasons as the Eagles' senior vice president of business operations.

Reid had been linked to the opening in Arizona before the Chiefs put on the press.

The Cardinals now intend to interview former Chiefs coach Todd Haley, a person familiar with their plans told the AP. Haley led the Chiefs to the AFC West title in 2010, but was fired in December 2011 and spent this past season as the offensive coordinator in Pittsburgh.

Hunt told the AP in an interview Monday that he would have final say on the next Chiefs coach, rather than embattled general manager Scott Pioli. Hunt has not said whether Pioli will be back next season, but indicated that his future could be determined by the next coach.

Various reports have indicated that Reid would be open to working with Pioli, while other reports have said he would prefer to build his own front office. If Pioli is not retained, the top candidates to replace him include former Browns GM Tom Heckert and John Dorsey, who has been integral in building the Green Bay Packers into a perennial contender.

The opening in Kansas City is attractive on several levels: The Chiefs had five Pro Bowl players and two others chosen as alternates, despite their 2-14 record, and they have the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft for the first time in franchise history.

That selection could help the Chiefs fill a gaping void at quarterback.

Matt Cassel was benched midway through the season and Brady Quinn, who was playing on a one-year deal, struggled as his replacement. Reid has had success at developing quarterbacks in the past, working with Donovan McNabb - whom he helped draft with the No. 2 pick - during his time in Philadelphia and Brett Favre earlier in his career in Green Bay.

``What I am confident in is we'll have dramatically better play from the quarterback position in 2013,'' Hunt said. ``I don't know whether it'll be the ultimate, long-term solution or not. We'll just have to see how it plays out.''

Hunt refused to get into the details of his coaching search, a responsibility that he'd delegated to the general manager in the past. But Hunt did say that he had surrounded himself with the right ``resources'' to make a thorough, informed hiring.

The new coach will also report directly to Hunt, a departure from the previous 53 years of franchise history. The coach is also expected to have more say over personnel matters.

When asked to describe his ideal candidate, Hunt said: ``Somebody who has demonstrated the ability to build a successful program, or been part of building a successful program. Somebody of high integrity, somebody who is a successful teacher and communicator. Somebody who has a high football IQ, but at the same time likes to roll up their sleeves and work hard.''

Reid appears to fit most of those qualifications.

The Eagles were just 12-20 the past two seasons, but Reid's overall record of 130-93-1 represents the most wins in franchise history. The franchise was just 3-13 the year before he arrived, and two years later it went to the playoffs at 11-5 and second in the NFC East.

That was the first of five straight years in which the Eagles won at least 11 games, and included a trip to the Super Bowl after the 2004 season.

``He had the love and respect of every individual in this organization,'' Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie said upon firing him. ``This man is amazing to work with, smart and dedicated, and the record will speak for itself.''

The past couple of years have been difficult for Reid, whose oldest son, Garrett, died at training camp after a long battle with drug addiction. Reid fired close friend and longtime assistant Juan Castillo in October and later fired defensive line coach Jim Washburn.

Now, it appears that Reid is about to get a fresh start.

``Overall the job is still attractive,'' Hunt said of the Chiefs, who have not won a playoff game since 1993. ``The franchise remains very well respected around the league.''

---

AP Sports Writers John Wawrow in Buffalo, N.Y., and Bob Baum in Tempe, Ariz., contributed to this report.

---

Online:http://pro32.ap.org/poll andhttp://twitter.com/AP-NFL

Quick Links

Not everyone thinks the Redskins need to invest more at wide receiver

paul_richardson_smile.jpg
USA TODAY Sports Images

Not everyone thinks the Redskins need to invest more at wide receiver

While the rumors about the Redskins potentially trading for Marvin Jones from over the weekend were total nonsense, a reason they resonated so much with fans is because many believe Washington needs major help at wide receiver.

But during a segment of Monday's Redskins 100 show, analyst Trevor Matich assessed the position group and actually thinks that, as a whole, the team should be relatively pleased with the talent it has outside.

"I like it better than I have in recent years, especially if Paul Richardson stays healthy," Matich said.

His "especially" qualifier is a common one, and that's because Richardson is the most established wideout currently on the roster — and he still has just 1,564 career receiving yards to his name. However, a healthy Richardson (which the 'Skins never really saw in his first year, considering he got injured early in training camp and was never the same) provides Jay Gruden the field stretcher he loves to have.

Richardson isn't the only player Matich is anxious to see, though.

"Terry McLaurin, their draft choice from Ohio State, is legitimately a 4.3 guy," he said. "He gets deep down the field and catches the ball in space."

One of the biggest issues for the 2018 Redskins was a lack of speed at every single spot. In Richardson and McLaurin, the Burgundy and Gold now have a pair of pass catchers who can fly past corners, do damage 30-plus yards down the sideline and open things up for other targets as well.

Overall, in reacting to the Jones storyline, Matich really doesn't see a huge need for the organization to make any additions to that collection of pieces. 

"I think that when you take a look at all the other guys, Trey Quinn in the slot, things like that, this receiving corps is fine," he said. "It's not desperate. They don't need to invest resources to bring extra people in."

Now, is "fine" and "not desperate" the level the front office and coaches want their receivers to be? Of course not. But Matich's stance is intriguing, because he's content with who'll be lining up there while plenty of others absolutely don't see it that way and feel a trade would be prudent.

If you're in that second group, recent history indicates this is the dead zone for NFL deals. So try not to waste your time refreshing Twitter over and over and over.

Perhaps Washington gets to Richmond and, after a few weeks of practices and a couple of exhibition contests, realizes their depth chart could use another name. Or maybe an injury happens and forces their hand. But according to Matich, as of now, the offense can function with the parts it has in place.

MORE REDSKINS NEWS

Quick Links

Nerves, excitement define Manny Machado's first return to Baltimore

manny-machado-padres-knee-usat.jpg
USA Today Sports Images

Nerves, excitement define Manny Machado's first return to Baltimore

It’s important to remember that Manny Machado *never* gets nervous. Not outwardly, anyway.

 

The uber-talented Machado came up in August of a pennant race back in 2012, as a 20-year old learning to play a new position on the fly. Instead of the nerves getting to him, Machado thrived. It was because of his defense the team returned to the postseason for the first time in more than a decade.

 

And yet, hours before his first career game in Camden Yards as a visitor, Machado admitted that while Monday night he was mostly excited, by Tuesday afternoon, that excitement had turned to nerves.

 

“I’m never nervous,” Machado clarified quickly to a group of reporters he knew quite well the last seven years in Baltimore. “But I don’t know, I guess it’s like a weird nervous in a way. It’s just different. It’s a different nervous, it’s always coming to the same clubhouse, walking through the same door, parking in the same parking spot, taking the same route to the baseball field every day...it was just all different today. It’s a good nervous though. It’s a good nervous.”

 

If Machado was telling the truth, he didn’t show it on the field during batting practice and warmups. The third baseman smiled and laughed as he spoke with fans, graciously took a few pictures, and generally looked like he was enjoying himself.

 

Machado has been the center of attention plenty of times in his baseball career, and that was clearly the case once again. Even Orioles manager Brandon Hyde offered to keep his media availability short and sweet to leave time “for the other guy,” and as his session wrapped up he called out “Manny time!”

 

Of course, while it might be “a little weird” for him, Machado also emphasized how excited he was to be back.

 

“Excited to be back, excited to see the fans out there and take third base again, like I did for a long time,” Machado described. “It’s gonna be a lot different. Excited to take that field again. Playing baseball, going out there, going to bring back a lot of memories...Just excited to take the field again in Baltimore at Camden Yards.”

 

Machado was struck by how many number 13 jerseys he saw around town Monday, and if that anecdote is any indication, he can probably expect a warm reception when he walks out of the visitor’s dugout. He’s clear that he has no expectations, though.

 

“I don’t expect anything...just to go out there and play baseball,” Machado said. “I’m going to see a lot of fans that supported me, and those fans will never be forgotten. It’s going to be fun to see those faces again.”

 

One thing is certain. Machado is definitely trying to enjoy every moment of his return.

 

“It’s completely different,” he reiterated to reporters. “I’m just trying to soak it all in. Trying to go out there, play baseball, take it one day at a time...it’s just a little different today that it’s playing in front of a crowd that I’ve known for the last 7 years, so who knows? Try to take it all in and enjoy myself.”

 

Ultimately, the memories in this town were too many to count for Machado, who admitted there were a lot of emotions running through him before the game. It was telling how often he kept repeating how this wasn’t just his place of employment for all those years; it was home.

 

Of course, the best homes have the best local food, and Baltimore is no different.

 

“You can’t leave Baltimore without crabs, so we’ll be having some tonight.”

 

Machado knows his audience, and if there’s one thing fans in Baltimore love, it’s athletes who talk about Baltimore crabs.

 

It almost seemed like he’s played here before.

 

MORE ORIOLES NEWS: