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Will Ivy League's fall sports decision affect college football?

Will Ivy League's fall sports decision affect college football?

As the days of summer continue to be checked off the calendar, college football finds itself facing a diminishing amount of days left to finalize its plans for seeing football on college campuses this fall, if at all. One conference might be ready to make the call, at least according to some of their coaches.
 
The Ivy League has announced its final decision regarding fall sports, college football most notably, will come sometime this week. According to The Athletic, multiple coaches have stated "that they expect Wednesday's announcement to be that the league is moving all fall sports, including football, to spring 2021."


 
Could college football be headed for a new home on our calendars? How would that happen and who would ultimately make that decision? 
 
The decision for the Ivy League to move fall sports to the spring would be the first declaration from a Division 1 conference of its kind and could set the tone for the other FBS schools. The Ivy League was the first to cancel its basketball conference tournament back on March 12, under scrutiny at the time, due to the Coronavirus pandemic. It was soon to be followed by the other conferences once the severity of the COVID-19 outbreak was universally understood.
 
Harvard has already announced it will allow only 40% of undergraduates on campus in the fall, and all teaching is set to be conducted remotely. 
 
Moving all college football to spring 2021 is one of many scenarios being examined by athletic directors, school presidents and conference commissioners. Penn State athletic director Sandy Barbour has called spring football a "last resort," citing the proximity to the 2021 season. The realities of the varying concerns surrounding playing, including scheduling, are legitimate. 

RELATED: COLLEGE FOOTBALL'S DIVERSITY PROBLEM
 
Multiple programs including Kansas, Kansas State and Houston, have already been forced to suspend voluntary workout because of COVID-19 spikes among athletes. Those cases combined with a recent spike in COVID-19 cases continues to cast a shadow over the likelihood of college football being played as normal this fall.
 
The only thing that remains constant throughout this entire ordeal has been the ever-present fluidity of the world we inhabit. Those able to retain the flexibility and skill to adjust and react to new and pertinent information will be best suited to get us closer to seeing our fall traditions once again, even if it means seeing them in the spring. 

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D.C. Mayor grants exception to allow Wizards to hold team practices

D.C. Mayor grants exception to allow Wizards to hold team practices

With the nation’s capital entering Phase 2 of reopening on Monday, Mayor Muriel Bowser has given both the Washington Wizards and D.C. United waivers to hold team practices at their respective facilities. 

As the sports world continues to move closer to live-game play, these considerations allow each team the maximum amount of time to prepare for a return to play while simultaneously acting in accordance with the DC government’s COVID-19 health standards delineated in the Mayor’s June 19th Order.

The Wizards will be following the NBA’s health and safety protocol and are slated to return to play at the end of July in Orlando, Florida in what has been affectionately named the NBA’s ‘Bubble.’ Power Forward Davis Bertans has opted to not participate in the remainder of the Wizard’s season due to contract concerns, but in doing so leaves the Wizards limited time to find a potential replacement before play resumes.

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DC United has already had one unnamed player test positive for COVID-19, the team announced earlier this month. The positive case resulted following a round of mandatory testing administered to players as those tests are part of the protocol in advance of a return to full team training. According to reports, the player experienced mild symptoms and was not hospitalized. 

RELATED: DAVIS BERTANS OPTS OUT OF ORLANDO RESTART

Since the first reported positive case, neither team has reported any positive results for COVID-19 in any additional players, front office personnel, or training staff. DC United is set to begin play July 8th in the MLS Tournament and the Wizards are set to commence play on July 30th.

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Why one Wizards player is making the smart decision to skip NBA restart

Why one Wizards player is making the smart decision to skip NBA restart

With Davis Bertans on the doorstep of a potentially lucrative off-season and free agency period, the Wizards' forward's decision to opt out of the season restart in Orlando makes sense for both the team, which hopes to resign him, and Bertans, who hopes to make a lot of money and not be injured. 
 
From a Wizards fans’ perspective, this is obviously disappointing. At least for what it means this season. There won't be more of the ‘Latvian Laser’ knocking down big three-point shots for the Wizards for the remainder of this season; potentially in a Wizards jersey permanently.
 
But from a business point of view for Bertans, this is the smartest move Bertans could make with so much potential money at stake. He entered the 2019-20 NBA season signing a 1-yr/$7M contract that allowed him to become an Unrestricted Free Agent at the end of this season. 

RELATED: PLAYERS WHO WON'T BE PLAYING IN ORLANDO
 
Bertans, in just his fourth season, was in the middle of his best season in the NBA, averaging 15 points, five rebounds, and two assists per game while shooting 43% from behind the arc; all career highs. He is currently ranked seventh in 3pt % and 27th in Offensive Box Plus/Minus (2.7), above Gordon Hayward and Donovan Mitchell.
 
Not to be forgotten in this is the fact that Bertans has suffered two ACL injuries in his career. So it makes sense for him to not want to risk another season off rehabbing.

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Although the reason for the pause in play was awful, it has now provided an opportunity for Bertans to take advantage of the rest period to preserve his health and prepare for what will surely be an onslaught of potential suitors including the Wizards who are in full support of his decision to not return to play. 

Why? It makes sense for both sides - even if it is taking a valuable asset away from Washington in the season restart. 
 
The Wizards are already tight against the salary cap and with the pending return of John Wall on the horizon, there is more than enough incentive to try their best to retain Bertans with whatever abilities available. Bertans' heavy rebounding and paint presence compliment the Wizards offense tremendously by creating space, stretching the floor and knocking down big-play three-pointers. 
 
The NBA is full of talented guards and slashers but not too many knock-down three-point sharp-shooters. The asset of having Bertans at their disposal is not lost on The Wizards organization or players in the least bit. When, and if, the Wizards and Bertans find themselves reunited for the 2020-21 season, the reality of the Wizards being a tour-de-force in the Eastern Conference will be solidified.

And it could all be worth - for both sides - making it through a strange late/postseason without him.

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