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Alex Smith handles role with unselfishness, class

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Alex Smith handles role with unselfishness, class

SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP) Alex Smith ran off the field at Candlestick Park two weeks ago to a standing ovation and cheers from the sellout crowd, not much different from the reception last January when he took the San Francisco 49ers oh so close to a Super Bowl.

Now relegated to a backup role with the NFC champions, Smith's trip to the Big Easy this week leading up to Sunday's Super Bowl against Baltimore is hardly how he envisioned it.

This used to be his team. Now, he plays Joe Flacco in practice.

Smith expected to be under center chasing the franchise's sixth championship, not watching strong-armed second-year pro Colin Kaepernick direct the offense against Ravens star Ray Lewis and Co.

``I think a lot's being made of that. For one, I'd be lying if I said it wasn't a little bittersweet,'' Smith said. ``Yeah, I want to be out there. That's what you work for. Coming into the season, that's what I was thinking about. That was the mindset for me; that was the goal for me. At the same time, it is a team sport and these are all my teammates.''

As he has done during each such trying time in an up-and-down career full of them, Smith has handled the change with class and the shared team-first attitude that is a big reason his club made it this far.

And Smith, the No. 1 pick from the 2005 draft out of Utah, left no doubt that he would appreciate and relish the rare opportunity before him.

``Absolutely, yes, very much so,'' Smith said of enjoying this experience despite the high-profile, midseason demotion.

Smith acknowledged when he lost the job to Kaepernick back in November that he had done nothing wrong but get hurt. Not only had he completed 26 of his previous 28 passes - 18 of 19 for 232 yards and three touchdowns without an interception and a 157.1 passer rating in a Monday Night Football win at Arizona on Oct. 29 - but Smith earned NFC Offensive Player of the Week honors after that victory.

He then sustained a concussion in the second quarter of a 24-24 tie against St. Louis on Nov. 11. He sat out the next game as Kaepernick dazzled in his debut as an NFL starter, beating the Bears handily at home on Monday Night Football.

After that, coach Jim Harbaugh stuck with the ``hot hand,'' as he regularly put it, while complicating matters by still referring to Smith as a starter.

The eighth-year quarterback is already fielding his fair share of questions about how it feels not being on the field for the biggest moment in a player's career.

``If you can't be happy for them, then something's wrong with you,'' Smith said of his teammates.

Smith revealed last week that he actually got his shot in college when the starter went down injured. At Utah in 2003, starter Brett Elliott broke his wrist on the last play of the game in the second week of the season. Smith took over, and Elliott wound up transferring to Division III Linfield College.

So how could Smith possibly be angry at Kaepernick?

``It'd be pretty hypocritical to be upset about it,'' Smith said. ``It's the nature of sports. He got an opportunity, stepped up and made the most of it.''

Smith made a few things clear: No, his confidence isn't shaken, and, no, he hasn't thought about what's next - where he might end up, or as a starter or a No. 2. When the 49ers faced Arizona to end the season, Smith was asked if he looked at his brief playing time as an audition to be the Cardinals' QB for 2013.

Not with unfinished business this season.

``He's a very classy guy,'' said Packers QB Aaron Rodgers, in Smith's draft class.

San Francisco lost to the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants 20-17 in overtime of the NFC title game last January. That fueled everybody, the 28-year-old Smith included.

Smith tossed a perfect 14-yard touchdown pass to tight end Vernon Davis with 9 seconds remaining as the Niners stunned Drew Brees and the New Orleans Saints 36-32 in the divisional playoffs last year.

Smith, once booed by the home crowd as he struggled to find a groove for an ever-changing list of offensive coordinators, finally shined last season and produced a career year while thriving under the guidance of former NFL quarterback Harbaugh.

It was Smith, unsigned at the time, who organized San Francisco's summer workouts at nearby San Jose State during the 2011 lockout. Harbaugh handed over his playbook, fully trusting that Smith would be back. He did return on a one-year deal and guided the 49ers to a 13-3 record to end an eight-year playoff drought. Then, he received a three-year contract last spring after Harbaugh and the 49ers flew to North Carolina to work out Peyton Manning, who wound up in Denver.

Smith showed no hard feelings and went back to work. Here's a guy who threw for 1,737 yards and 13 touchdowns with five interceptions and posted a 104.1 passer rating this season.

His family life certainly helps him keep everything in perspective.

Smith and his wife, Elizabeth, are expecting their second son in mid-March to join big brother-to-be Hudson, who turns 2 in May.

Smith has said all the right things and quietly left much unsaid. He has stayed behind the scenes and out of the spotlight - rarely seen in the locker room, even - praising Kaepernick's clutch decision-making and cool demeanor all the while.

``Alex has been a class act as far as handling everything that is going on,'' Davis said. ``He's been through a lot. But he also understands that it's the nature of the business. And this is a business.''

It's not as though it was Smith's first benching. There were several changes during the 2010 season alone.

These days, Smith's backup job is far from complicated.

``For me, it's just being worried about being ready to go,'' Smith said. ``That's my responsibility, knowing the game plan, staying in it, staying focused in the meetings. You don't get the reps that you used to get, so it's a different style of preparation. For me, I have to take the reps standing back there watching, and really do it through Kap.

``You never know when your opportunity's going to come. The good ones are ready when they do come.''

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Ravens at Chiefs Week 3: Date, time, TV channel, live stream, how to watch

Ravens at Chiefs Week 3: Date, time, TV channel, live stream, how to watch

Two weeks and two wins have the Baltimore Ravens off to a fast start in 2019. After a 59-10 win in Miami, the Ravens took care of business at home defeating the Arizona Cardinals, 23-17.

While Lamar Jackson may have not replicated the numbers that earned him AFC Offensive Player of the Week following the opener, his Week 2 performance was still impressive. The second-year quarterback threw for 272 yards (including a beautiful deep ball to Marquise 'Hollywood' Brown to seal the game) and two touchdowns while rushing for 120 yards.

Jackson now has seven passing touchdowns in two games, more than he compiled in all of his starts last season.

Defensively, Baltimore was once again solid even while missing Jimmy Smith in the secondary. Despite allowing Kyler Murray to throw for over 300 yards in the Air-Raid offense, Baltimore only surrendered one touchdown late in the game.

Through the first two games of 2019, things have gone about as good as they can for the Ravens. Even with matchups against teams that don't look like contenders, wins are wins in the NFL. But now, the Ravens will face their biggest test yet when they head to Kansas City to face the Chiefs.

Led by reigning MVP Patrick Mahomes, the AFC West leaders are also a perfect 2-0 on the season. Even with the absence of receiver Tyreek Hill for a majority of the two games, Mahomes is already making a case for a two-peat as MVP. Through 120 minutes of action, he's thrown for 871 yards and seven touchdowns, completing 71.4 percent of his passes. 

Mahomes and company will offer plenty of challenges for the Baltimore defense. Travis Kelce, Sammy Watkins and a plethora of other weapons allow Mahomes to disperse his passes all over the field. Come Sunday, the secondary will have its hands full.

The Week 3 matchup is also a rematch of one of the better games of 2018. Mahomes and the Chiefs outlasted Jackson and the Ravens 27-24 in overtime, something the team still hasn't forgotten about

Sunday promises to be a good one, here's everything you need to know about the game:

RAVENS AT CHIEFS WEEK 3:

Who: Baltimore Ravens at Kansas City Chiefs 

What: Week 3 regular season

When: Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019, 1:00 p.m. ET

Where: Arrowhead Stadium, Kansas City, MD

TV Channel: CBS 

Live Stream: CBS Sports, FuboTV

Radio: WBAL New Radio 1090, 98Rock and 101.5 FM

Weather: Partly cloudy, high of 72 degrees, chance of rain 50 percent

RAVENS 2019 REGULAR SEASON SCHEDULE:

Week 1: Sun., 9/8 at Dolphins, 1:00 p.m. (W, 59-10)

Week 2: Sun., 9/15 vs. Cardinals, 1:00 p.m. (W, 23-17)

Week 3: Sun., 9/22 at Chiefs. 1:00 p.m.

Week 4: Sun., 9/29 vs. Browns, 1:00 p.m.

Week 5: Sun., 10/6 at Steelers, 1:00 p.m.

Week 6: Sun., 10/13 vs. Bengals, 1:00 p.m.

Week 7: Sun., 10/20 at Seahawks, 4:25 p.m.

Week 8: BYE week

Week 9: Sun., 11/3 vs. Patriots, 8:20 p.m.

Week 10:  Sun., 11/10 at Bengals, 1:00 p.m.

Week 11: Sun., 11/17 vs. Texans, 1:00 p.m.

Week 12: Mon., 11/25 at Rams, 8:15 p.m.

Week 13: Sun., 12/1 vs. 49ers, 1:00 p.m.

Week 14: Sun., 12/8 at Bills, 1:00 p.m.

Week 15: Thu., 12/12 vs. Jets, 8:20 p.m.

Week 16: Sun., 12/22 at Browns, 1:00 p.m.

Week 17: Sun., 12/29 vs. Steelers, 1:00 p.m.

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How the Ravens will try to slow down the NFL’s best offense in Kansas City

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How the Ravens will try to slow down the NFL’s best offense in Kansas City

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — The Ravens have got a big problem on their hands. Or, more accurately, they’ve got a bunch of problems to deal with.

The Kansas City Chiefs have, since the beginning of last season, been the NFL’s best offense. With reigning MVP Patrick Mahomes at quarterback, all-pro Travis Kelce at tight end and a seemingly replenishing stable of speedster wide receivers, the offense has been nearly unstoppable.

They’ve scored 34 points per game this year. Mahomes has passed for 821 yards and as a team, they’ve averaged 479 yards each week. 

Now it’s the Ravens turns to get a chance at stopping, or at least slowing down, the NFL’s most vaunted attack.

“World-class tight end, world-class sprinters out there at wide receiver,” Ravens defensive coordinator Don Martindale said. “Obviously you’re talking about an offense that averages over 35 points per game last year. It doesn’t look like there’s any drop-off from last year. It’s going to be a great challenge for us.”

The man leading it all, Mahomes, is perhaps the league’s most talented quarterback. He won MVP last season after throwing for 5,097 yards, 50 touchdowns, and just 12 interceptions. 

This season, he’s already ushered in discussions that he could throw for 6,000 yards and 60 touchdowns, which would completely shatter the NFL’s previous records. In his third season, he’s already one of the league’s most feared players.

“You have to play to the whistle,” cornerback Brandon Carr said. “He’s a guy that can extend the play – smart guy, big arm, strong arm. They have a lot of different movements and gadgets and a lot of different things going on with their offense, so you have to have disciplined eye control, 100 percent communication and just play as a unit for 60 minutes.”

One of Mahomes most dangerous traits, however, is his ability to throw the ball on the run. With a cannon for an arm, Mahomes is just as dangerous throwing across the field while scrambling as he is while he’s stationary in the pocket. 

In last year’s thrilling Week 14 game, a 27-24 Ravens loss, Mahomes threw his first no-look pass, which caught the eye of the NFL and was one of the highlights of his stellar season. 

Later in the game, with the Ravens up by seven, Mahomes and his offense were faced with a fourth and nine. After Mahomes took the snap, the play broke down and he had to scramble to his right. On the move to his right, he threw the ball across the field nearly 40 yards in the air to Tyreek Hill, who took the ball into the red zone. 

Multiple Ravens players and coaches said they still think about that play and game, even into this season.

“You keep him in the pocket as much as you can,” coach John Harbaugh said. “You make him throw under pressure as much as you can. You cover the guys as well as you can. Then, you play football. That’s what you try to do. If he throws one up down the middle again, hopefully, we’ll get it this time.”

Mahomes’ arm strength is just one of his abilities as a passer, of which there are many. By far, however, that’s what can change a defense the most.

“The thing about Mahomes, is once he scrambles, he’s looking across the field, down the field, he’s not scared to make those type of throws,” safety Earl Thomas said. “Most quarterbacks won’t try that.”

It might be easier to handle Mahomes, however, if he didn’t have a team full out some of the best receiving weapons in the league. 

Unfortunately for the Ravens, he does. 

Even without Tyreek Hill, who is out with a shoulder injury, the Chiefs have been able to replace him with a host of other speedy receivers that both the Jaguars and Raiders weren’t able to figure out.

“Hill runs about a 4.21 40, (and) they put in a guy that runs about a 4.22 40,” Martindale quipped. “They’re fast.”

Sammy Watkins leads the team in receiving with 247 yards and three touchdowns, but the rest of the wideouts are loaded with speed, too. Demarcus Robinson has 172 yards and two touchdowns, while Mecole Hardman has 61 yards (albeit on four receptions) but is as speedy as ever. 

Then, at tight end, Kansas City has perhaps the game’s best tight end in Kelce. He’s got 195 yards and a touchdown this season. 

The receivers and their speed are one thing, but when they can take the top off the defense only to have Kelce under the middle, the Chiefs present a world of problems for opposing defenses.

“He’s just going to be hard to cover,” Harbaugh said of Kelce. “I don’t care what you do, how you cover him, how many guys you put on him – he’s going to be a challenge to cover. You don’t really expect to shut him out. We’re going to try to keep the batting average down just a little bit. I’m sure we’ll throw some different things at him.”

The man calling the shots is Andy Reid, one of the most respected and creative offensive minds to ever stand on the sidelines in the NFL. 

The Chiefs can hurt you through the air and even on the ground. Running back LeSean McCoy has averaged five yards a carry over 20 carries this season, too.

Even with left tackle Eric Fisher out with an injury, it’s hard to find a significant weak part of the offense. And that includes behind the white lines.

“Andy Reid, to me, we’re talking about all these young and innovate offensive coordinators, he’s the grandfather,” Martindale said. “He’s the OG of the innovators of offense. The offense he has in Kansas City, everybody steals from. He’s the king of the RPO, he’s the king of the shots, he’s the king of the screens. I think we’re just the men for the job, but it’s a tough out.”

The Ravens think they can be that out for the Chiefs. They added Earl Thomas in the secondary in the offseason, and even with Jimmy Smith and Tavon Young sidelined, still boast one of the top units in the NFL.

And not only are the Ravens prepared to stop the Chiefs explosive offense, they’re confident, too.

“Luckily, the Ravens have me playing free safety, controlling the deep end,” Thomas said. “I plan on eliminating all the big plays.”

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