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Griffin not playing for Redskins

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Griffin not playing for Redskins

CLEVELAND (AP) Robert Griffin III won't be running wild or throwing passes for the Redskins. He can only watch them.

Washington's electrifying rookie quarterback is inactive for Sunday's game against the Browns, eliminating any chance of him helping his teammates continue their NFC playoff push.

Griffin sprained his right knee last week against Baltimore, and after days of speculation about his playing status, the Redskins announced late Saturday night that rookie Kirk Cousins will start.

Cousins, who came off the bench last week against Baltimore after Griffin got hurt, will make his first career start and veteran Rex Grossman will be Washington's No. 2 QB. Grossman has been inactive for every other game this season.

Griffin sustained a mild sprain of the lateral collateral ligament when he took a scary hit from Ravens defensive tackle Haloti Ngata following a 13-yard run late in the fourth quarter. He was limited in practice all week, but as of Friday it appeared he might play and coach Mike Shanahan was keeping tight lipped about his young star's status.

The 22-year-old RG3 was one of the first players on the field Sunday morning. He seemed to be moving well with a brace on his knee. At that point, it still wasn't official that he would not be inactive, and the Redskins (7-6) didn't make it known that No. 10 would suit up at all until 90 minutes before kickoff.

The Browns spent all week preparing to face Griffin, who is tied with New England's Tom Brady for the league lead in passer rating and who has dazzled opponents and fans with his speed and arm strength.

His absence could be a break for the Browns (5-8). Cleveland has won three straight games and is still in the playoff chase after starting the season 0-5.

Cousins rallied the Redskins in the fourth quarter last week, throwing a late touchdown pass and ran for a 2-point conversion before the Ravens won in overtime. Washington selected Cousins in the fourth round of April's draft. The former Michigan State star was somewhat of surprise pick because the Redskins had already selected Griffin after trading several picks to St. Louis to move up to get last season's Heisman Trophy winner.

Cousins also played earlier this season after Griffin sustained a concussion against Atlanta. He has completed 7 of 11 passes for 137 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions.

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Lamar Jackson’s play this season has begun to make some analysts and fans backtrack 

Lamar Jackson’s play this season has begun to make some analysts and fans backtrack 

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Lamar Jackson is starting to make people reconsider what they think of him. 

After the Ravens’ 49-13 win over the Bengals on Sunday, the rest of the NFL is starting to take notice about Lamar Jackson’s status in the NFL. Especially considering his spin move through the Bengals defense.

Hall of Fame NFL general manager Bill Polian recently admitted that he was wrong when he said that Jackson should be an NFL wide receiver during his draft process in 2018.

“I was wrong, because I used the old, traditional quarterback standard with him, which is clearly why John Harbaugh and Ozzie Newsome were more prescient than I was,” Polian told USA TODAY Sports. 

Jackson is currently building an MVP case for himself and is on-pace for over 30 touchdowns and nearly 5,000 yards of total offense. 

It’s a nice change of pace for the 22-year-old quarterback in his second year as a pro. Jackson had to face heavy criticism after he left Louisville for a variety of reasons headed into the draft. Even after he took over as the Ravens quarterback, those evaluations persisted. 

“We always knew what he was about,” Ravens center Matt Skura said. “We always knew his ability to make plays and all that stuff. I think it’s just people right now seeing it on a much larger scale and it’s just getting the attention now.”

At this point, however, it’s clear that not only is Jackson a quarterback, he might even be the MVP of the league.

Of the five quarterbacks drafted in the first round of the 2018 Draft, only four are starting and just two have led their teams to a winning record. Jackson leads all of his draft counterparts in total yards and total touchdowns. 

But as anyone in the Ravens’ locker room will say, the accolades don’t concern Jackson — only the record does.

“I think he’s more concerned with winning than anything,” Orlando Brown Jr. said. “As individuals, we’ve all got people to prove wrong and things that we used to put a chip on our shoulder. At the end of the day, I know he’s more concerned with winning more than anything.”

Still, it’s noteworthy that it only took Jackson a complete season of starts, through two partial seasons, to begin the backtracking across the NFL landscape.

“If you watch ESPN or you watch TV, it’s going to come up no matter what,” Skura said. “Even on your Instagram feed it’s going to come up. I think for a lot of us, just in one ear and out the other as far as people pumping us up. You’ve kind of got to stay level-headed and ride the rollercoaster, so to say.”

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Hayden Hurst set on helping those with depression and anxiety

Hayden Hurst set on helping those with depression and anxiety

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Hayden Hurst immediately saw the impact of his documentary last week when, just hours after it aired, people reached out to him to tell their stories. 

Hurst was a part of a documentary titled “Headstrong” that aired on NBC Sports Washington last week, which detailed his struggles with depression and anxiety as a baseball player. The documentary will air on NBCSN on Nov. 20.

Now, Hurst is reaching out to tell his story in hopes of impacting those who struggle with mental illness, as he did.

“I think it’s going to reach a lot of people,” Hurst said. “Some people even reached out to tell me stuff that affects them in their lives. It’s very cool, it’s very humbling.”

Hurst was a standout baseball player in high school and was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 17th round of the 2012 MLB Draft. He signed immediately and began his professional baseball career. 

But shortly thereafter, Hurst developed the “Yips,” and he was unable to throw strikes like he once did. On the mound, his hands shook when he attempted to pitch. Off the field, his condition began to deteriorate. 

He said he began to self-medicate and that’s when he started to seek help. 

After he retired from baseball, he decided to play football at the University of South Carolina and began to treat his mental illness. In 2018, he was a first-round pick of the Ravens.

“It’s night and day from where I was,” Hurst said. “Back in the baseball days, my lack of success in baseball kind of led to my off the field issues. I kind of self-medicated a little bit to make everything go away. Where I’m at now, I’m so much more mature, I’m so much more in-tune with the person that I am, I’m close with my family.”

Hurst is now set out on telling his story to help others who might be in the same situation that he was in. With his background as a professional baseball and football player, he’s hopeful that people will see his situation and feel compelled to talk about what they’ve been going through.

“I really want to tell my story so I get it out there and people can relate to it and they can see it and read it and see the silver lining in it,” Hurst said. “I think a lot of people struggle with things and not a lot of people like talking about it.”

It’s difficult for him to make speeches and speak with others during the NFL season, but he’s got plans to travel to Columbia, South Carolina and Jacksonville, Florida to reach out to people who might be in need of help in the offseason.

He’s already begun work in Baltimore and wants to continue to help through his foundation, the Hayden Hurst Family Foundation. 

For now, though, he wants everyone to know that it’s OK to not be OK. Hurst’s story proves that. 

“I think more people are affected by it than we think,” Hurst said. “It’s a sensitive topic and not many people like talking about it. I’m in a position where — this sounds worse than it is — I really don’t care what people think about me. I am who I am, it’s part of the make up of who I am and I’m going to tell my story.”

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