Ravens

Quick Links

Hot ticket: Players make Super Bowl ticket grab

201301281609581912022-p2.jpeg

Hot ticket: Players make Super Bowl ticket grab

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Heading back to his hometown, Jacoby Jones couldn't afford to tell the truth.

The All-Pro kick returner for the Baltimore Ravens got 15 tickets for the Super Bowl as a participating player. The demand from family, friends in New Orleans was way beyond that.

No Big Easy there.

``I told my family before I left (Baltimore) I only got nine,'' Jones said, shaking his head and smiling. ``They're expensive and I'll do something for you during the game, so y'all can be together.''

Each Raven and San Francisco 49er player and coach had access to 15 tickets: two complimentary, the rest for purchase. Prices range this year from $800 to $1,200, the same as last year in Indianapolis.

When the game was last played in New Orleans 11 years ago, every seat cost $400.

Tickets also are available to players on injured reserve. For the 49ers, that's almost 90 people, not counting front office personnel who generally had access to two tickets each.

``I said I only got nine so they'd fight over them,'' Jones said with a laugh. Then he did a really smart thing: He put his mother, Emily, in charge of ticketing. ``My mom is old school, no nonsense. She's from here, born and raised. It will be immediate family.''

Jones tried to make up for the shortfall by buying the rest of his family jerseys, about 30 in all.

Teammate Ed Reed was in the same pickle. He's from New Orleans, too. So the star safety sought advice from Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma, who played in a Super Bowl in his hometown of Miami three years ago.

``I would actually auction off tickets to random folk if I could,'' Reed said. ``I'm still kind of chopping things down, making sure you've got your lists right, especially when you come home. You want everyone to come to the game.

``Honestly, I could fill the Superdome up. I could fill every seat. I would love to, but you can't. So I want my family to know that right now. Things are starting to get a little pricey, but I'm just grateful to go through it. I could do this every year.''

With a seven-figure salary, he could. Some other players who don't quite earn those big bucks might find a yearly Super Bowl trip too expensive.

Nah.

``I took all 15, for everybody in my family and my boys back home in Indy,'' said second-year receiver Tandon Doss, a backup for the Ravens. ``It's the Super Bowl.''

The NFL keeps about one-fourth of the tickets, with many going to league sponsors. Each participating team gets 17.5 percent for the organization and for its fans, who generally enter a lottery to purchase tickets. The host club gets 5 percent, and the other 29 clubs get 1.2 percent each, or 34.8 percent overall.

The Superdome's capacity for the Super Bowl is approximately 72,000.

Players who don't fill their allotment become more popular than ever with teammates who need as many tickets as they can get their hands on.

Niners defensive lineman Ricky Jean Francois attended LSU and most of his pals are still in Baton Rouge. But he didn't buy all the tickets available to him.

``I had a lot of requests but I only take care of the immediate family,'' he said. ``I ain't worried about all the friends and everybody else out there. I just stuck with the immediate family. Let's get that over with - and save money, too.''

Teammate receiver-punt returner Kyle Williams only wanted friends and relatives at the game if he was playing. He's on injured reserve. His popularity quotient probably spiked because it meant extra tickets for other Niners.

But Williams' decision was rare. Many other players grabbed their 15, then handed them to family members to distribute.

``My mom handled it all,'' San Francisco All-Pro linebacker Aldon Smith said, echoing many 49ers and Ravens. ``People have to understand the ticket thing, so we made it clear: Go through my mom.''

Ravens cornerback Corey Graham set some ground rules for his tickets: Only people who came to his games all season.

``You have a lot of people that are going to want to come to the game because it's the Super Bowl,'' Graham said. ``But if you haven't been supporting me throughout the year, going to the regular games when we were playing the Detroit Lions or the Cleveland Browns, then why would I want to bring you out here to come to a great place like New Orleans to see the Super Bowl on the greatest stage in the world?''

Sorry.

---

Online:http://pro32.ap.org/poll andhttp://twitter.com/AP-NFL

Quick Links

Ravens defense digs too deep a hole in 33-28 loss to Chiefs on the road

ravens-chiefs-defense-usat.jpg
USA Today Sports Images

Ravens defense digs too deep a hole in 33-28 loss to Chiefs on the road

The Ravens needed to hold the Chiefs to eight or less yards to get the ball back. 

Faced with a third-and-9 in their own territory, the Chiefs dialed up a screen pass to win the game. Instead of nine yards, they got 16. 

On a day when the defense had trouble getting off the field, it was only fitting the Ravens couldn’t get a stop when it mattered most in a 33-28 loss to the Chiefs on Sunday at Arrowhead Stadium.

“That play is really kind of a play that everybody on the defense is really kind of involved in,” Tony Jefferson said. “So we say, ‘Who’s responsible for the screen? Everybody.’ Back to the drawing board, we’ll look at it and see the things we’ve got to fix.”

The Ravens defense allowed 503 yards of total offense, a number they didn’t hit all of last season. The longest play was an 83-yard touchdown from Patrick Mahomes to Mecole Hardman to put the Chiefs up 20-6 in the second quarter. 

Mahomes finished the day with 374 yards passing and three touchdowns. His 374 yards passing was a number Mahomes needed overtime to hit last season.

“That’s an explosive, very good offense,” Jefferson said. “Mahomes did a good job extending plays, as we knew.”

Baltimore’s defense allowed 23 points in the second quarter as it had trouble dealing with Kansas City’s vaunted passing attack. But a problem that came up unexpectedly was the run, as the Chiefs averaged 5.4 yards a carry. 

The Ravens trailed 23-6 at halftime, but cut the lead multiple times to a one-score game in the second half. But the 17-point deficit was far too much to overcome, especially with an offense like Kansas City’s. 

“I thought our guys fought like crazy,” coach John Harbaugh said. “If we get a little bit better, we’ll win games like this.”

The game took a bit of a turn in the second half, as the Ravens continually went for two-point conversions in an aggressive game plan. They missed all three. 

They also went two-for-three on fourth down conversions, in an effort to keep their offense on the field and keep Mahomes off it.

“Analytically, when you look at the numbers, it’s not even close,” Harbaugh said. “In terms of percentage of chances to win the game. We believe in our offense, we’re going to try and get as many first downs as we can.”

And while the defense improved in the second half and only allowed 10 points, the damage was done as the Ravens offense couldn’t climb out of the hole left by the big halftime deficit. 

Even the aggressiveness of the offense couldn’t make up for the early halftime deficit.  

“We talked about it going into the game, that our offense was going to take chances on fourth down and we were ready for it,” Jefferson said. “We totally agreed with it, because we don’t back down from anybody.”

MORE RAVENS NEWS:

Quick Links

Stock up, stock down: Rating the Ravens after their five-point loss to the Chiefs

ravens-chiefs-lamar-usat.jpg
USA Today Sports Images

Stock up, stock down: Rating the Ravens after their five-point loss to the Chiefs

In a monster AFC matchup on Sunday, the Ravens weren’t able to get enough offense and enough stops on defense to earn the win. 

The loss drops the Ravens to 2-1 ahead of the Browns matchup on Sunday.

Here are a few players whose stocks are up and down after the loss.

Stock down: Pass defense

The Ravens defense knew they had a challenge to face against Patrick Mahomes. It’s likely they won’t see one like him again. 

Mahomes threw for 374 yards on 27-of-37 passing and had three touchdowns passing. He led an offense that scored three touchdowns in the first half, the same number it scored against the Ravens last season. 

It wasn’t pretty for the pass defense, as a blown coverage led to an 83-yard score which gave the Chiefs all the momentum they needed. 

Three receivers (Travis Kelce, Sammy Watkins and Darrel Williams) had five or more receptions.

“Some of them (deep pass plays) were well executed by them,” coach John Harbaugh said. “The one touchdown was just played wrong by a certain player, that happens. So that’s what happened.” 

Stock down: Lamar Jackson

Jackson had the first rough game of his 2019 season.

He finished just 22-of-43 and had 267 yards. He looked impressive on the Ravens first drive of the game and bought time with his legs in the pocket, but faltered as the game wore on. 

Jackson picked his game up in the fourth quarter, but was aided by two throws that can only be described as Hail Mary throws caught by Seth Roberts and Willie Snead. 

“We let our defense down, I feel,” Jackson said. “I had a lot of throws I should have made, I feel.”

Stock up: Nick Boyle

The first of two positives on the offense, Boyle was the team’s leading receiver with four receptions for 58 yards.

With Mark Andrews (three catches for 15 yards) hobbled with a foot injury, Boyle was Jackson’s most consistent target over the middle of the field.

When Andrews returns to full health, Boyle likely won’t see the volume of targets he saw today. But it was a nice day for the Delaware product.

Stock up: Mark Ingram

The Ravens made a commitment to the run game on the first drives of each half, and it showed as Ingram tied a Ravens record with three rushing TDs in a game. 

Ingram finished with 103 yards on 16 carries — a 6.4 yards per carry average — and was the game’s leading rusher.

“I think it speaks for itself, we ran the ball well,” Harbaugh said. “Offensive played excellent, played tremendous I thought.”

Stock down: Two-Point Plays

Woof. The Ravens had three two-point plays, including one that came from the one-yard line, and weren’t able to score on any of them. 

They went for two up 6-0, down 30-19 and 33-28. They made none of those. 

Still, despite the result, it may not have been the worst decision to go for two points...

Stock up: John Harbaugh’s decisions

Hang in there on this one. 

The Ravens first decision to go for two points was due to the fact that they had the ball at the Chiefs one-yard line and thought they could punch in a quick conversion. The second decision was likely to cut the lead to nine, so that a touchdown and a field goal would win the game instead of merely tie the game. The final decision was to cut the lead to a field goal. 

Harbaugh said he doesn’t regret any of the decisions. 

“I don’t think we’re setting any tone, there’s no tone to be set,” Harbaugh said. “You’re trying to do everything you can to win the game. And when you get the ball at the one-yard line, it makes a lot of sense to go for two. Unless you’re playing scared, which we aren’t going to do.”

Stock down: Run defense

The Ravens allowed 140 yards rushing (5.4 yards a carry) to a host of Chiefs running backs. Williams and LeSean McCoy had 6.9 and 6.8 yards per carry to lead the team. 

Against Mahomes, knowing his deadliness passing the ball, the run defense had to be as sharp as ever. Unfortunately for the Ravens, it wasn’t as the Ravens could slow down the Chiefs ariel and ground attack.

Stock down: Linebackers

Patrick Onwuasor had a pass go inches above his hands in a metaphor for the entire afternoon. 

He, Chris Board and Kenny Young didn’t have their best days as the Chiefs were able to run the ball well all afternoon. 

Mahomes was able to fling the ball out to the flats early in the game, as his running backs ran free in the flat all afternoon long. 

Overall, the Ravens defense just had an afternoon to forget. 

MORE RAVENS NEWS: