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Lewis grew to love Baltimore, and vice versa

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Lewis grew to love Baltimore, and vice versa

OWINGS MILLS, Md. (AP) When Ray Lewis was selected in the first round of the 1996 NFL draft, he didn't even know the nickname of the team that drafted him.

The Cleveland Browns had just moved to Baltimore, and general manger Ozzie Newsome chose Lewis with the 26st overall pick after taking tackle Jonathan Ogden at No. 4.

``I picked up the phone,'' Lewis recalled, ``and the first thing I said to him was, `Ozzie, what's our team name going to be? Who are we?'''

Lewis quickly became the face of the Baltimore Ravens, and the stellar middle linebacker will remain a beloved figure in Charm City long after he pulls off his No. 52 jersey for the final time.

``When you think about the Baltimore Ravens, the first name you mention is Ray Lewis,'' Baltimore running back Ray Rice said Tuesday. ``That's just what it is, and it's something that will never be taken away from him.''

The 37-year-old Lewis will retire after the Ravens finish their current playoff run, which continues when Baltimore (11-6) plays at Denver (13-3) on Saturday.

Lewis was elected to 13 Pro Bowls, was twice named NFL Defensive Player of the Year and was Super Bowl MVP after the 2000 season. But nothing makes him prouder than saying that he played 17 seasons, all with Baltimore.

``Out of everything that's been going on, that's probably the biggest thing that has me the most excited, that I've been able to stay in one place for so long,'' Lewis said. ``You watch so many players go in and out, shuffle from team to team.

``For me to be here, I was a kid when I came here and didn't have a clue what was going on. I grew with this city and this city grew with me. I will die a Raven. That's an awesome, awesome feeling. There's no greater achievement for me, myself, to say I've always been connected to one thing my entire life.''

John Unitas left Baltimore for San Diego, Joe Namath spent time with the Los Angeles Rams, Joe Montana bounced from San Francisco for Kansas City. The list goes on.

``Look at the guy we're going up against this week, Peyton Manning,'' Ravens guard Bobbie Williams said. ``He could probably go back to Indianapolis and be mayor if he wanted to, but he couldn't finish his career in one place.''

Lewis did. And although Lewis hasn't announced plans to run for office in Baltimore, Williams is certain his teammate could make some noise on election day.

``He's very political, well-spoken, very articulate,'' Williams said. ``He would put up some good numbers at the polls.''

Baltimore loves Lewis, and he loves Charm City right back. After Lewis did his trademark dance on the field as the clock ran out on the Ravens' 24-9 win over Indianapolis last Sunday, Colts receiver Reggie Wayne called the celebration ``disrespectful.''

Lewis dismissed the charge Tuesday, insisting that the display was not intended as a slap in the face to the losing team.

``When he was in Pop Warner playing football, I was in Baltimore,'' Lewis said. ``The game was over. I didn't go toward their sideline and make a big issue of it because I've never been that type of player. (It was) a salute to my city, knowing that people love to see that. And not just people. My teammate encouraged me the most. It was about me, honoring my team and honoring my city.''

Williams started his 13-year career in Philadelphia, then toiled for eight years in Cincinnati before coming to Baltimore last June. Lewis started in Baltimore and ended in Baltimore. Period.

``It's awesome,'' Williams said. ``Even some of the greats that have played this game, at the end of their career they bounced around trying to get one more year in. But for one guy to play here his entire career, and to be relevant even to the end, it's unheard of.''

Lewis has been playing for Baltimore as long as the Ravens have been the Ravens. No other player in the world can make that claim.

``It's a great thing, the relationship between Baltimore and Ray,'' coach John Harbaugh said. ``It's very unique. I don't think there can ever be another situation like this. Jonathan Ogden was a similar situation, obviously. You've got two guys who came in when the organization was just beginning. As Ray said, before there were team colors, before there was a mascot, there was Ray and Jonathan Ogden. ... It's just a very special thing.''

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Hot day of joint practice between Ravens and Eagles cut short

Hot day of joint practice between Ravens and Eagles cut short

PHILADELPHIA — On a day with the heat index at 100 degrees, the Ravens first joint practice in Philadelphia against one of the favorites to come out of the NFC ended about 45 minutes short.

This week is the Ravens' second joint practice of August, the first of which came when the Jaguars came to Baltimore for two days of practice before the preseason opener. 

“The best thing is I think the tempo ramps up a little bit,” coach John Harbaugh said on joint practices. “You get different guys, different schemes. I do think it notches up one or two clicks, which is good for you. This is a really talented football team, the Eagles, so we get a chance to see some really good players.”

Even with some positive feelings from the practice, there were, and still are, a few question marks about the Ravens and their available bodies. 

Kenneth Dixon, Gus Edwards, and Miles Boykin were notable absences from practice from the start. Left guard Jermaine Eluemanor left practice early, and Ronnie Stanley and Mark Ingram didn’t take reps towards the end of practice.

With the heat beating down, it’s unclear if they were related to the weather. Harbaugh had no updates after practice, for players that missed the entirety, or players that left early.

The practice was ruled by defense, though, as the Ravens offense had trouble scoring in the red zone most of the afternoon. One of the biggest highlights, however, was a diving catch by Mark Andrews in the back of the end zone. 

“The red zone is tough, the red zone is faster, coverage is tighter,” Harbaugh said. “Things have to be executed more quickly, more decisively. The windows are going to be closing quicker, they’re going to be smaller. Timing is really important, execution is everything. For a young quarterback, it’s a fast game as it is.”

Defensively, the Ravens secondary held its own against a talented Eagles offense. 

Notably, however, Earl Thomas was beaten on a deep route by Alshon Jeffery on a pass from Carson Wentz.

“What I’ve drawn from the last two joint practices is the competitive juices you get from going against a new team,” Thomas said. “Carson Wentz is not a pushover, it’s good to go against him. It’s good to go against that offense. Tight ends are pretty good, receivers are pretty good.”

The Ravens will practice with the Eagles once again tomorrow before a day off on Wednesday. The two will play, officially, on Thursday in the team’s third preseason game. 

Until then, they’ll just focus on getting better against a team that’s one of the league’s best.

“You see different routes, you see different combinations in the passing game, you see different quarterbacks,” Thomas said. “All of that is great.”

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Ravens Roundup: Team not changing much ahead of week three vs Eagles

Ravens Roundup: Team not changing much ahead of week three vs Eagles

Player News:

Lamar Jackson is going to once again play around 20 snaps in week three, as he has throughout August. Normally, this is the week in which the starters get the most reps, but the Ravens don't want to change things up with Jackson.

Cyrus Jones is preparing for a big opportunity as the Ravens' new top slot cornerback after the neck injury to Tavon Young.

Justice Hill continues to jump off the screen this preseason after rushing for 49 yards and a touchdown on 10 carries against the Packers in week two.

Looking Ahead:

Preseason Week 3: Thursday, August 22 at Philadelphia Eagles

Preseason Week 4: Thursday, August 29 at Washington Redskins

Week 1: Sunday, September 8 at Miami Dolphins, 1 PM

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