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Umpire injured in Orioles-Blue Jays game released from the hospital

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USA Today Sports

Umpire injured in Orioles-Blue Jays game released from the hospital

Plate umpire Dale Scott was out of the hospital early Saturday, hours after sustaining a concussion when he was hit in the mask by a foul tip from Baltimore slugger Mark Trumbo during a game in Toronto.

Scott told The Associated Press by text that he was feeling OK and that the results of a CT scan were normal.

The veteran crew chief left the field on a spinal board in the eighth inning after being struck Friday night. He was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital.

Scott recoiled after the ball struck the bottom of his mask and knocked it off, staggering backward before going down on one knee. After being examined by Blue Jays trainer George Poulis, Scott lay down on his back on the turf behind home plate and received further attention from paramedics and Toronto's team physician.

Once his neck was immobilized, Scott was lifted onto a cart and driven off the field, exiting through a gate in the left field corner.

The game was delayed more than 10 minutes. It resumed with second base umpire Brian Knight working behind home plate.

Scott also got a concussion from a foul tip last year. Umpires usually are out of action for at least a week when they have a concussion, depending on the severity.

[RELATED: Orioles hit four home runs to get by the Blue Jays]

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On the fourth anniversary of his massive contract, a look at Chris Davis' struggles

On the fourth anniversary of his massive contract, a look at Chris Davis' struggles

From 2012 to 2015, Chris Davis was one of the most feared sluggers in baseball.

He led the American League in home runs twice, won a Silver Slugger and finished third in MVP voting in 2013. His production earned him a massive seven-year, $161 million contract extension, and today, on the four-year anniversary of the agreement things have tailed off quite a bit. 

"He's been struggling now for years," Orioles GM Mike Elias said at the Winter Meetings. "There are a lot of reasons for that and we continue to look into it but the reality is, he is under contract and it's something not to take lightly, and because of that we're going to be focused on getting the most out of him that we can. But it's a very frustrating situation for him and for us."

In the 617 games before his extension, Davis hit .257 with 161 home runs, 425 RBI and 788 strikeouts.

Since signing his deal, Davis has hit .198 with 92 home runs, 230 RBI and 745 strikeouts in 518 games. 

The Orioles have finished fifth in the AL East three out of the four seasons following Davis' contract, and while it's hard to imagine things getting worse, the Orioles still have his salary on the books for another three years. 

Maybe Davis has an extra gear in him to spark a career-revival as he enters his age-34 season. That would certainly help the Orioles get back to relevancy, but after two straight seasons of hitting below .200, it's hard to expect much from Davis moving forward. 

But hey, at least he's using his money for good. In early November, Davis and his wife donated a record $3 million to UMD Children's Hospital to help the hospital expand. 

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Trey Mancini admires Ryan Zimmerman, wants to see Orioles through rebuild

Trey Mancini admires Ryan Zimmerman, wants to see Orioles through rebuild

Trey Mancini wants to be the next Ryan Zimmerman...kind of.

Though the two play completely different positions (right field vs. first base) for two different teams, Mancini saw what Zimmerman did to help develop the Nationals into World Series champions and wants to do the same in Baltimore. 

"[Zimmerman] stuck it out [in D.C.], he was their first draft pick and was there through a lot of good times and bad," Mancini said in an interview on "The Leadoff Spot" on MLB Network Radio on Wednesday. "I think there's something really admirable in that...you see what Zimmerman means to D.C."

The Orioles drafted Mancini in the eighth round of the 2013 MLB Draft; since then he's played three full seasons in the league, though 2019 could be described as his "breakout" campaign.

Last year Mancini hit .291 in 154 games, leading the Orioles with a career-high 35 home runs and 97 RBI. 

Mancini plans to stay in Baltimore through their rebuild, not only because it's the team that drafted him, but also because he loves the city and all of the people in the organization. 

"It's always hard to see yourself somewhere else," Mancini said. "It could make it sweeter if you're there through some rough times and through a rebuild, and come out on the other side...a goal of mine later on is to be there when we're winning again." 

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