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Proposed NFL rule change would eliminate Ravens' intentional holding strategy

Proposed NFL rule change would eliminate Ravens' intentional holding strategy

BY TYLER BYRUM, @theTylerByrum

It made everyone do a double-take, then it made perfect sense to non-Cincinnati and non-Pittsburgh fans.

Back in Week 12 when the Baltimore Ravens held off the Cincinnati Bengals 19-14, it wasn't a single touchdown that made national headlines. Rather it was a game ending safety that cut a seven-point deficit to only five. 

On the final play, numerous Ravens players held the opposing Bengals, who were setting up to receive punt, with 11 seconds left on the clock. Punter Sam Koch, just sat back, draining the clock before finally running out the back of the end zone with the clock at zero. 

SEE LINK FOR FULL RULE EXPLANATION

Thursday it was proposed to the NFL's Competition Committee to make plays like this illegal. 

While it may be considered unfair to some, making this new rule would simply add to an already expanding rule book and only be used for a select handful of plays a year, maybe. 

Eliminating cleverness of coaches that are well versed in the NFL rule book, should not be the approach of the of rule adaptations. There is no impact on player safety nor does it make the game 'more watchable' (like the extra-point rule).

Not only that, but the new proposed rule just leaves another set of loopholes for coaches to take advantage of at the end of a game. What if team trying to score on the last play commits two offensive penalties just to get another shot at the endzone?

But before making a massive overhaul to fix all of the loopholes in the NFL rule book, can we establish what a catch is first?

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Report: John Harbaugh to miss NFL Combine after knee replacement surgery

Report: John Harbaugh to miss NFL Combine after knee replacement surgery

John Harbaugh is officially on the injury report.

According to Jamison Hensley of ESPN, the reigning NFL Coach of the Year won’t be in Indianapolis next week for the NFL Combine due to a knee replacement surgery he underwent two weeks ago. It’s the first time he won’t be in Indianapolis for the NFL Combine. 

Harbaugh, 57, led the Ravens to a 14-2 regular season in 2019 — a franchise best — and won his first Coach of the Year award. 

Harbaugh and the majority of the Ravens coaching staff will return for next season after Greg Roman and Don “Wink” Martindale weren’t selected for head coach openings. 

The Ravens currently have the 28th pick in the 2020 NFL Draft. 

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Ravens' Hayden Hurst hopes his story helps end stigma surrounding mental health

Ravens' Hayden Hurst hopes his story helps end stigma surrounding mental health

Hayden Hurst broke his silence on his struggles with depression and anxiety back in November following a documentary detailing how it affected his baseball career. The Baltimore tight end opened up even more about his experiences in an interview with First Coast News' Chris Porter and talked about his desire to end the stigma surrounding mental health. 

“I want to use my platform to help people,” he said. “For some reason, people equate mental illness with having to be ashamed. It’s something you shouldn’t talk about. I don’t think it’s anything to be ashamed of. Everybody goes through something. The best thing my parents ever did was just being available. There’s not really a right or wrong thing you can say or an answer that can change everything but just making sure you’re available and you’re understanding. If my story is going to change the narrative on this and people are going to talk about it more, then so be it.”

Before Hurst was selected in the first round of the 2018 NFL Draft by the Ravens, Hurst explained an unsettling incident in which he cut his own wrists and ended up in the hospital without even knowing it. 

“I woke up in the hospital,” Hurst said. “I didn’t know what happened. I had to have a friend fill me in. Apparently, I had been drinking and went into my apartment and cut my wrist. My friend found me in a puddle of blood. He called 911.”

It was at the moment he was hospitalized where Hurst realized he needed to ask for help. Now he spends his time, when he's not catching passes or blocking for Lamar Jackson, speaking to kids about his experiences and how important it is to ask for help. 

“I don’t have the answers to fix all of this. It’s still a trial and error to this day, but I will say I have much more good days than I do bad days. I’m not this superhero that’s portrayed on TV. I’m a regular person. I struggle with depression, anxiety and things like that.”

Hurst's foundation is hosting a golf tournament next week to help a Youth Crisis Center in Jacksonville, FL. 

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