Nationals

Can Team USA be better than 2008 champs?

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Can Team USA be better than 2008 champs?

From Comcast SportsNet
LAS VEGAS (AP) -- They lost Dwyane Wade but gained Kevin Durant. Dwight Howard's size has given way to Russell Westbrook's speed. The Americans know their men's Olympic basketball team will look much different than the one that captured gold four years ago in Beijing. Three of the most important players from that team were unable to return, but the carryovers keep talking about being better now than they were then. "I think it has the potential to be that if we learn to use our versatility. It's a more versatile team than 2008. Now does that translate into being better?" coach Mike Krzyzewski said Sunday. "Although we don't have the center, that team didn't have Durant or Westbrook. So it's a different team and we'll see if it becomes better, but it can be. It could be." In some ways, that's difficult to envision. Wade was the team's leading scorer, averaging 16 points in just over 18 minutes per game off the bench. Howard started at center and averaged 10.9 points while shooting 74.5 percent from the field. Chris Bosh, also out this summer, backed him up and shot even better, knocking down 24 of 31 shots (77.4 percent) and leading the team with 6.1 rebounds per game. How can any team make up for all that? "Well, we have some guys that can pick that up," LeBron James said. "I mean, D-Wade was our leading scorer, but we didn't have Kevin Durant on our team. We didn't have the activity of Tyson Chandler on our team as well and the athleticism at the point guard position." Westbrook is an offensive upgrade over Jason Kidd, the point guard not back from 08, and is seen by teammates as the player who could most easily fill Wade's role as the game-changer off the bench. As James sees it, Andre Iguodala is more athletic than Tayshaun Prince, and James Harden can do more things offensively than Michael Redd. Prince and Redd, along with Carlos Boozer, were reserves on the 2008 team but were not retained. Kidd retired from international competition after winning two gold medals. "If you match us up, we have so many great pieces that guys can just play to their strengths, and I think we can be better," James said. Having Durant is a start. The NBA's three-time scoring champion had the best tournament ever by an American player at the world basketball championship two years ago, scoring 22.8 points per game. But the biggest difference could be James, who was already a great player in 2008 but has grown into the best in the world by now. Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul and Deron Williams, the other young players from that team, have made similar leaps toward superstardom, and Kobe Bryant has held steady where he was. "First of all, you have to look at the guys who are with us from the 08 team. They were 21, 22 years old back in Beijing. They're now in the prime of their careers, so they're a lot bigger, stronger, better basketball players today," USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo said. "Those players by themselves are much better and I look at the players we've added. We have much more depth, much more talent than we had in 08 when I look at this roster versus that roster, and I'm not looking to make comparisons, but when asked the question, I'll put this team up against anyone." Center remains the biggest question mark. Chandler was the NBA's Defensive Player of the Year and has become more of a weapon offensively in recent years, but he's still not quite Howard. Kevin Love and Blake Griffin will have to show they can handle the move to center as well as Bosh did. The Americans averaged 106.2 points in 2008 and smashed their opponents by nearly 30 per game. Nobody was close to them until the gold-medal game, when Spain was within four points with 2 minutes left before the U.S. pulled away to a 118-107 victory. Playing at that level again won't be easy. So no matter what the expectations are now, none of them matter until the games start in three weeks. "We didn't do nothing yet," Anthony said. "So until we go out there and we win the gold medal, then people are going to talk, going to speculate, but we'll see after we win the gold medal if we determine if we're a better team than 08."

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Nationals turn to Patrick Corbin to close NLCS in a sweep

Nationals turn to Patrick Corbin to close NLCS in a sweep

WASHINGTON-- Holding a bottle of Bud Light in his left hand, the one which produced enough quality pitches for a $140 million contract, Patrick Corbin was a peripheral party participant.

He’s generally quiet. When the All-Star break arrived, he and his wife, Jen, made initial plans to go to the Hamptons. They went to upstate New York instead. The couple stayed with Jen’s parents because getting to the Hamptons seemed like a pain. Then he came back to work.

Asked during the post-Wild-Card Game celebrating how he would explain the team’s run to someone from home who had not been watching, Corbin smiled.

“Who would that be?”

Fair point. 

What’s now pervasive well beyond the greater Syracuse area is the Nationals’ weeks-long burn. They are 15-2 in their last seventeen games. The season reached the edge of extinction late in the Wild-Card Game, then again in Game 5 of the NLDS. The National League Championship Series is a romp thus far, and Corbin’s chance to close it with a sweep comes Tuesday night in Nationals Park.

Washington, finally, is not playing from behind. No National League team has ever lost a seven-game series with a 3-0 lead. The Nationals even suddenly have a 50-50 shot of winning the World Series, according to projections at fivethirtyeight.com. Those odds will likely twist to favor the eventual American League champion, either New York or Houston. For now, the Nationals have the juice. 

“I wouldn’t say it’s odd,” Sean Doolittle said. “It feels nice. We’re not taking anything for granted, but this is definitely a better position to be in than we were three games after the last series. I think it can be a situation where we can come and continue to play with that loose confidence that is when we’re at our best, without feeling like we have our backs against the wall. Not that we’re uncomfortable in that position. But, we can be the aggressor in this situation.”

Corbin is trying to follow his rotation mates by snuffing out any St. Louis offense. The Cardinals have the worst batting average in NLCS history, a meager .121. St. Louis is going through a historic malaise. Corbin is going through his first postseason.

His start was rough. Corbin walked in a run to open Game 1 in Los Angeles. But, he worked his way through six innings despite the ineffective opening. A disastrous relief appearance followed three days later. Corbin’s routine and outcomes were upended. He sat in the dugout during the rest of Game 3 against Los Angeles, stone-faced and wondering what happened. Asked afterward why he remained instead of walking into the clubhouse to decompress, he said, “I don’t know.”

Things have been better since then. Corbin’s relief appearance in Game 5 against Los Angeles was paramount. He matched up late in Game 2 against St. Louis. Days typically reserved for bullpen sessions turned into in-game journeys during the season’s most difficult time.

“I feel great at this time,” Corbin said Monday. “Been lucky to stay healthy this whole season and just -- you just kind of continue to do what you've done, be smart about things. I think at this point in the season you're not lifting as heavy as you would and maybe backing down on some running and things like that. But pretty much the same routine. Body feels great. If you can't get up for these games, then yeah...”

Corbin faced St. Louis twice this season: April 29 and Sept. 17. St. Louis was an offensive force in April. September is the more relatable sample. Corbin went six innings, allowed five hits, no earned runs, four walks and struck out 11.

“I’ll just try to go over film and go over what I did do well and what I didn't do well,” Corbin said. “At this point, everyone kind of knows what I've done. I just need to go out there and execute those pitches.”

Corbin was speaking in the same press conference room used for his introduction almost a year ago. Stephen Strasburg and Max Scherzer sat in the front row. Together, they went into spring training, then the regular season, as the core of everything. They remain so in the postseason. Strasburg and Scherzer have done their series work to this point. Corbin’s chance comes Tuesday night, when he can close it down, send the Nationals to the World Series, and grab another round postgame.

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Jay Gruden answers questions on the Redskins' culture, Dwayne Haskins and what's next

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Jay Gruden answers questions on the Redskins' culture, Dwayne Haskins and what's next

Jay Gruden has had the label of "ex-Redskins head coach" for a little more than a week now. Turns out, being out of the sport is already wearing on him a little bit.

"Pretty quiet really," he said Tuesday on the Dan Le Batard show when asked what life's been like since being fired on Oct. 7. "Bored out of my mind."

During his tenure with the Burgundy and Gold, of course, things were the opposite of quiet. Gruden dealt with a stressful combination of losing, injuries, quarterback drama, off-field distractions and front office issues for five-and-a-half seasons with the team.

But still, though he's no longer associated with the franchise, he chose not to take any shots at it, even when pushed to comment about its much-maligned culture.

"I can't say anything negative about the culture," Gruden explained. "When you're a coach and you want to put a team together, you have a vision of what that should look like and sometimes it doesn't match other people's vision and that's where problems occur. But, on the flip side of that, when you are a coach, you don't have GM responsibilities or you don't have total say, then you have to do the best you can with what you're given."

He also had a chance to talk about Dwayne Haskins, the Redskins' first-round QB. Reports have trickled out ever since Haskins was drafted stating that he wasn't Gruden's preferred choice, because Gruden needed to win in the short term and Haskins was a long term option. 

Gruden told the show why he didn't insert Haskins into the lineup when he was in charge yet also expressed hope for the passer's future.

"People are excited when you take a guy at 15, you want to see him play right away. But it was our professional opinion that he wasn't quite ready to step in and play in the first five games of the season," he said. "He's very raw, but he's very talented. It will take some time with him. He just wasn't ready when I was there. Maybe he'll get ready in the next coming weeks."

As for what's next, Gruden has an idea. He wouldn't mind the opportunity to "dabble" in TV or radio, but ultimately, he hopes to return to the sidelines. 

"I feel like coaching is what I want to do," he said. "It's what I was born to do. I love the game, I love being part of it. I love leading people, young groups of men and trying to get them better and maximize their potential. Unfortunately, I did a poor job of that at Washington, but hopefully I'll get another crack at it."

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