Orioles

Change almost a certainty for Browns

201212231733632345061-p2.jpeg

Change almost a certainty for Browns

BEREA, Ohio (AP) Phil Dawson's locker looked ready to host a Hawaiian luau.

Following practice, Dawson returned to his dressing area and found it decorated with a poster of two pink flamingos, inflatable parrots, flowered leis and the word ``Aloha'' draped across the front. After 14 seasons, the Browns' kicker made his first Pro Bowl.

Time to celebrate.

Might as well. There won't be much else to enjoy. Change awaits.

Following Sunday's finale in Pittsburgh, the Browns (5-10) are expected to undergo another radical makeover. That might begin with coach Pat Shurmur's firing after two seasons and could include general manager Tom Heckert being replaced. Although his fate seems sealed, Shurmur is doing all he can to keep his team focused on beating the Steelers (7-8).

Shurmur understands he hasn't won enough.

``Listen, I get this,'' he said Thursday, addressing the uncertainty ahead. ``My concerns are for my team and making sure that we do all the right things during the game to give our guys the best chance to win. That's where I'm at. At some point after that, I'll begin to think about what goes on from there. I'm not worried about it.''

It's more of the same for the Browns, who just two weeks ago were still in the playoff hunt. But a pair of lopsided losses to Washington and Denver and a slew of injuries pushed them to a familiar place - the brink of change.

During what may have been his final formal news conference, Shurmur reflected on what he and his staff accomplished with one of the NFL's youngest teams that includes 17 rookies.

``I think we've made improvements,'' he said. ``Some may say not fast enough, but I think we've made improvements. I think we came into a less than ideal situation when we got here. Every situation is different and I'm proud of that. I'm proud of the work that the guys that I hired did in terms of inspiring the players to improve.

``We have not won enough football games and I know that's the way this things works, but in our situation I see improvement and I'll leave it at that. The rest of it, going in depth to all that, I think that's a discussion for after we play Pittsburgh.''

New Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and CEO Joe Banner may have already decided to dismiss Shurmur, who is 9-22 with one game left. If he's fired, Shurmur will join Eric Mangini, Romeo Crennel, Butch Davis and Chris Palmer as coaches unable to build sustained success in Cleveland.

Browns return specialist Josh Cribbs can't take any more turnover.

``I hate that we rebuild every year,'' said Cribbs, who has been with the Browns since 2005. ``It's not a good recipe for successful football.''

Cribbs' contract expires after this season. He believes it would be a shame if Shurmur and Heckert aren't retained.

``A lot of people don't get a fair shake in this business, whether it be the quarterbacks or the regime,'' Cribbs said. ``They came in during the lockout, now the owner decided to sell the team. It's just so unfortunate the way the nature of the business is.

``But I'll tell you one thing, we're geared up to win this last game, to give it our best shot because this win, a sweep of Pittsburgh would do a lot for this city and might do a lot for the coaching staff as well.

``Finishing strong is the biggest thing at this point.''

The Browns haven't swept the Steelers in a season since 1988. A win Sunday would make the Browns 3-3 in the AFC North after going just 3-21 inside their division the previous four seasons combined.

Browns linebacker D'Qwell Jackson had hoped this would be the season where change wasn't necessary. However, he understands it may be unavoidable.

``With a new owner comes new changes and new obstacles, new challenges,'' he said. ``I hope it's for the better, I hope so. Mr. Haslam, he seems like a passionate guy. He enjoys what he's doing and he wouldn't have bought this team if he didn't think about being successful doing it. Just because it's change doesn't mean it can't be a good change.''

Dawson has seen every alteration made by the Browns since 1999. The soon-to-be 38-year-old has remained while hundreds of players and dozens of coaches have come and gone in Cleveland. He may be more practiced at change than others, but it's still as difficult now as when he was a rookie.

``Change is never easy. I don't know anyone that enjoys it,'' he said. ``But with all the unknown right now, if I have any advice for my teammates it's deal with the known. What we do know is we get to play the Steelers this week. What we do know is we get one last chance to go out, this group with these coaches, everyone together and try to win a football game, and it's not just some game. This is the Steeler game. `'

Notes: Dawson was voted the team's player of the year and Jackson was selected the ``Good Guy'' award winner by the local chapter of the Pro Football Writers of America. It was Dawson's first win. ``Didn't know that,'' the Texan said when informed after practice. ``Ya'll are desperate. Golly.'' Dawson has made 28 of 29 kicks this season and all six attempts from 50 yards or longer. He's made 84.2 percent of his career kicks, the highest percentage of the 25 kickers with 300 or more field goals. ... Browns safety T.J. Ward spoke for the first time since suffering a season-ending knee injury two weeks ago. Ward sustained a bone bruise and said he will not need surgery.

---

Online:http://pro32.ap.org/poll andhttp://twitter.com/AP-NFL

Quick Links

One player from each AL team that could benefit from MLB's shortened season

One player from each AL team that could benefit from MLB's shortened season

Major League Baseball's decision to implement a 60-game season will come with some interesting obstacles. Players will have very little time to prepare for the end of July start date, and some who use the 162-game marathon to slowly reach their best form could enter an early-season rut and never recover.

However, the shortened season will not be negative to all. Veterans with a lot of wear and tear can avoid another grueling season, while streaky players won't have to see their early success fall off in the second half of the season.

Looking at the American League, here is a player from every squad that could benefit from fewer games.

AL EAST

Baltimore Orioles: John Means

Means, who was an All-Star in 2019, was spectacular in his first 12 starts in the rotation. He had a 2.69 ERA throughout what would essentially be a full season in 2020. However, the lefty then showed signs that he was still adjusting to the full-time starting role, as he featured a 4.69 ERA in the next 12 starts.

While he looks to be part of the future starting pitching plan in Baltimore, adjusting to a 30-start slate can take time. The Orioles aren’t looking to win big in 2020, even if the season gives them a better chance, and so fewer starts will allow Means to still get in work while also keeping his arm ready for future seasons. 

Boston Red Sox - Nathan Eovaldi

Eovaldi was an essential part of the Red Sox World Series run in 2018. He was relied upon heavily both as a starter and out of the bullpen. In 2019, he found himself struggling to stay healthy as he consistently dealt with arm problems.

A shorter season in 2020 could be just what he needs to regain form. Less wear and tear on the arm in what could only be 12 starts during the regular season lessens the risk of him once again heading to the DL and increases the chances of success in the rotation.

New York Yankees - Gary Sanchez

Sanchez is one of the most dangerous bats in the game when he’s on the field and at full health. The problem is he’s struggled to do just that throughout his career. In the last two seasons, he’s only played in 195 games. Additionally, the long seasons behind the plate have also gotten to him, as his hustle and energy have noticeably decreased at times.

With only 60 games in 2020, that all changes. Sanchez has an easier chance of remaining healthy while also having to spend less time catching, which could give him an increase in energy and fresher legs that typically wouldn’t be there as the season winds down. That combination should help the power hitter continue to crush the ball.

Tampa Bay Rays - Bullpen

Despite having the likes of Blake Snell, Charlie Morton and Tyler Glasnow in the rotation, the Rays used their relievers heavily in 2019. It worked, as the bullpen was dominant and made it possible to reach the postseason.

That formula for success probably wasn’t going to disappear in 2020. Now, the extended usage won’t be as grueling. In a season where bullpens could dictate success if starting pitchers struggle to get back into game shape and build stamina, the Rays seem in good hands.

Toronto Blue Jays - Ken Giles

Giles had a solid 2019 with the Blue Jays, finishing with a 1.87 ERA and 23 saves. The only problem was a nagging elbow issue that followed him throughout the season.

The shortened season and late start should both benefit his arm, as he’ll have fewer appearances to make. Heading into the final year of his deal, the ability to still perform at an elite level while not adding mileage or more pain to his throwing arm is the ideal situation for Giles.

RELATED: NL PLAYERS THAT COULD BENEFIT FROM SHORTENED SEASON

AL CENTRAL

Chicago White Sox - Michael Kopech

It’s not a given that the highly-touted prospect will be a part of the White Sox plans in 2020, but as NBC Sports Chicago’s Vinnie Duber points out, this 60-game scenario could benefit Kopech.

Essentially, Kopech and his electric arm were being watched very cautiously in spring training due to injuries he’s dealt with in the past. With a 162-game season assumed, there was speculation that Kopech would first spend time in the minors before potentially joining the pro club later in the season, as a way to monitor his usage.

But now with a shortened season, Chicago could opt to let him start in the majors and get some work in, whether it be starting or in the bullpen. With fewer innings to get through overall, Kopech could get more action than was expected.

Cleveland Indians - Adam Cimber

Cimber had his name called upon 68 times in 2019, and the first 37 of those appearances went rather well (3.06 ERA). However, the final 31 did not (6.29 ERA).

Part of that struggle could most likely be attributed to fatigue. 2020 realistically only gives Cimber enough time to put together the body of work he had in his first 37 appearances, if that. A sample size of that nature bodes well for him and the Indians. 

Detroit Tigers - Miguel Cabrera

The veteran showed in Spring Training that he still has plenty of pop in his bat, even taking Gerrit Cole deep twice in one game. However, even in the DH role, a 162-game grind isn’t ideal.

With extended rest and a shortened season on the horizon, the right-hander could ride a hot start right into another solid year of production.

Kansas City Royals - Jorge Soler

Soler can swing with the best of them, especially when he gets rolling. That became evident during a 60-game stretch from July 24 to the end of the season when he hit .292 and had 21 home runs, as stated by MLB.com's Jeffrey Flanagan. 

Yes, that was in the middle-end of the season after seeing a lot of pitches throughout the season, but should Soler come anywhere near that during the 2020 season, he’ll have an incredible season.

Minnesota Twins - Rich Hill

Many pitchers will benefit from a shortened season, and Rich Hill is most definitely one of them. Hill entering his age-40 season, meaning his arm has been through quite a lot in 15 years of MLB action.

Additionally, the new Twin is coming off surgery that was expected to delay his debut until June. With baseball not starting until the end of July, he won’t just be ready, but he’ll be well-rested in a season in which fewer innings will be asked of him.

The Twins were looking to get value out of Hill by signing the veteran, and the shortened season may make that decision all the more plausible.

AL WEST

Houston Astros - Justin Verlander

Since joining Houston in 2017, Verlander has been an absolute workhorse and innings-eater. Not only that, but he’s been dominant throughout. In 2019, he led all of baseball in innings pitched, and that didn’t include his postseason work. 

There’s no reason to expect a steep drop-off in 2020, but a 60-game season may make it even easier for him to continue his reign as one of the best pitchers in baseball. Houston will not only expect him to go deep in games in the regular season but to do the same if they make the playoffs. Last season, Verlander shows signs of being human and dealing with fatigue in the World Series, where he had a 5.73 ERA in two games. 

Limiting his starts through 60 games should keep the arm fresh and the velocity sharp for as long as he is needed, limiting the chances of any decline when the games mean the most.

Los Angeles Angels - Shohei Ohtani

Ohtani can throw a top-end fastball and hit balls 400 feet. However, injuries have prevented him from doing both at the same time consistently in the major leagues. New manager Joe Maddon wants to see it be done, and there may be no better time to try it out then during a short season. 

If 162 games were to be played, it may be a lot to ask Ohtani to start a game and then hit the four others. It still may be a lot, but it’s much more realistic for him to contribute on the mound and at the plate in 2020.

Oakland Athletics - Sean Manaea

Manaea has been a talented starter for the Athletics over the past few years when he’s on the field. A no-hitter in 2018 showed just how dominant he could be. However, he has dealt with arm problems in the past and is coming off a season where he didn’t take the field until September.

Though he performed well upon his return (4-0, 1.21 ERA), a 60-game season will make it easier for him to remain healthy and effective.

Texas Rangers - Corey Kluber

A familiar face in a new place you may have forgotten about, Kluber was acquired by Texas in hopes that he will be its ace for the next few seasons. His past body of work shows he’s up for the challenge, but 2019 was a year filled with injuries.

Now, the 2017 Cy Young winner is back to full health, but after appearing in just seven games last year, there could have been some concerns about how his arm would fare over 162 games. That’s no longer a concern, and the Rangers should be able to rely on Kluber in a year where every team has a better chance at the postseason.

Seattle Mariners - Daniel Vogelbach

Vogelbach was an All-Star in 2019, and that was largely due to his performance in the first half of the season. During his first 70 games, Vogelbach hit an average .249 but had 20 homer runs and 48 RBI. Following that, he batted just .162 in the second half and the power numbers decreased as well (nine home runs).

For a player with a ton of power who has the ability to get off to a hot start before pitchers tend to figure him out, a 60-game season is a dream come true. Though he may never hit for an insane average (he did hit .310 through the first month of 2019), he has the ability to produce runs at a fast rate in a short timeframe.

Stay connected to the Orioles with the MyTeams app. Click here to download for comprehensive coverage of your teams.

MORE ORIOLES NEWS:

Quick Links

Report: Officials say RFK site not an option for Redskins unless team changes name

Report: Officials say RFK site not an option for Redskins unless team changes name

As the Redskins search for a new football home in the future, the RFK Stadium site is one that is at the top of the list. However, unless the team is willing to change its name, the area becoming their new field is a non-starter, The Washington Post reported on Wednesday

Speaking with several government officials, a similar message was shared throughout. The federally owned land will not be given to the franchise if the name remains what it is today.

“I call on Dan Snyder once again to face that reality, since he does still desperately want to be in the nation’s capital,” D.C.'s nonvoting delegate to the House of Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton (D) said. “He has got a problem he can’t get around -- and he particularly can’t get around it today, after the George Floyd killing.”

“There is no viable path, locally or federally, for the Washington football team to return to Washington, D.C., without first changing the team name," D.C. Deputy Mayor John Falcicchio said.

Washington's name has been a topic of debate for years but has recently received major pushback over the past month as the nation yearns for racial justice following the murder of George Floyd.

It was also reported on Wednesday that investment firms and shareholders worth a collective $620 billion have asked Nike, FedEx and PepsiCo to terminate their business relationships with the Washington Redskins unless the team agrees to change its name.

The Redskins have expressed interest in playing on the grounds of RFK after a bill was introduced in 2019 calling for the federal government to sell the area to the city. However, the bill won't pass through Congress unless the land is used for the team under a different name. U.S. Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.), chair of the House Natural Resources Committee, referred to the current name as a "racist nickname."

RELATED ARTICLE: RON RIVERA MAKES FIRST PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING REDSKINS' NAME

Redskins owner Dan Snyder has stated in the past that he is not open to a name change, as he considers it to be an act of honor toward Native Americans. 

Washington currently plays its games at FedEx Fied in Landover, Md. Both sides would like to see the team return to the District, but for as long as they are called the Redskins, it won't happen.

“The time has ended,” Grijalva said. “There is no way to justify it. You either step into this century or you don’t. It’s up to the owner of the team to do that.”

“The city obviously would like the team back,” Norton said. “But it’s important that [Falcicchio] used the word ‘federally’ -- meaning that they now recognize that there is no hope unless this name is changed.”

Stay connected with the MyTeams app. Click here to download for comprehensive coverage of your teams.

MORE TEAM NEWS