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Chiefs, Army leaders discuss head injuries

Chiefs, Army leaders discuss head injuries

FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. (AP) Former Kansas City Chiefs players and Army leaders said Wednesday that a change in culture about the risks of concussions must start at the top levels in sports and the military.

The comments came during a forum at Fort Leavenworth on traumatic brain injuries, the sixth in a series of such events to bring awareness to concussions and brain injuries. Several dozen Army officers listened to the discussion, including comments by Pro Football Hall of Fame linebacker Willie Lanier, who said he learned the lessons early.

Lanier, who played from 1967 through 1977, serves on an NFL player safety panel studying ways to make the game safer. Lanier suffered numerous concussions in his rookie season, including one that didn't manifest until a week later. Lanier says he changed his playing technique as a result, but only after he sought answers to his injury at the Mayo Clinic.

``It wasn't hard for me to do. I figured out I had to change the way I play the game or I don't play,'' Lanier said. ``It just becomes practical that if you're going to do it, you better do it smart. Because if you don't do it smart you have all types of potential risks that you really shouldn't take.''

The military has been looking at the impact of traumatic brain injuries as soldiers return from combat. The Army and NFL signed a joint letter in August announcing the partnership.

The NFL faces lawsuits by thousands of former players who say the league withheld information on the harmful effects concussions can have on their health.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said Tuesday in Detroit that the partnership with the Army is about sharing what is known about head injuries and protocols for clearing soldiers and players to return to action, whether it be the battlefield or playing field. A portion of the program is changing the culture and the soldier and player frame of mind.

``It's about trying to combat the warrior mentality, which is you want to be on the battlefield or what you want to be on the field, but you need to be healthy and you need to identify yourself when you have an injury,'' Goodell said.

He said the NFL is stressing that players take precautions to identify when they or others may have had an injury that needs proper medical care.

``I think that's what hopefully our partnership with the Army is going to help do for our soldiers and our players,'' Goodell said.

Lt. Gen. David Perkins, commander of the Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, said the military is learning to take brain injuries serious as soldiers see repeated concussions and head injuries from combat and training.

``Used to be a time when you had an event like that, here are the smelling salts, shake it off and go on. We didn't know what we didn't know,'' Perkins said.

Col. Emery Fehl, commander of Munson Army Health Center, said that 253,330 service members have had a traumatic brain injury, but that 84 percent happened inside the United States, either during training, falls, sporting events or other activity.

``This is not a one-time war issue that once we draw down from Afghanistan we won't be talking about this,'' Fehl said. ``We will be talking about this for a long time.''

He said new protocols issued in September require soldiers who have a concussion to be pulled off the line for at least 24 hours and given medical clearance before returning. Subsequent concussions require longer time away from duty before being cleared.

Former Chiefs player Danan Hughes said players share the same mentality as soldiers that there is a duty to be on the field and that no one who replaces them will do as well. As such, he said, players do all they can to hide any effects, shake off symptoms and get back in the game.

He encouraged the Chiefs and the rest of the NFL to create centers near cities where teams are located so that retired players would have access to practitioners who could check them for signs and symptoms of traumatic brain injury. He cited the deaths of Junior Seau and Dave Duerson as examples of former players who may have benefited from such facilities.

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AP Sports Writers Larry Lage in Detroit and Dave Skretta in Kansas City, Mo., contributed to this report.

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4 keys for the Caps to win Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final

4 keys for the Caps to win Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final

It all starts Monday!

The Vegas Golden Knights will host the Washington Capitals in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final as both teams look to take early control of the series.

Can the Caps steal one on the road to start? Here are four keys to winning Game 1.

Win the first period

The Golden Knights have not played a game since May 20. While rest can benefit a team at this time of the year, there is such a thing as too much rest and over a week would certainly qualify. If there is absolutely any rust in Vegas’ game to start, the Caps need to take advantage.

T-Mobile Arena and the Vegas crowd have already built a reputation in year one. The atmosphere is going to be electric, but the Caps can combat that with a good start to the game and by scoring first.

Vegas is 10-1 when scoring first this postseason. If they are able to come in and get on the board right off the bat in the first period after seven full days between games, that does not bode well for the Caps’ chances.

Don’t allow Marc-Andre Fleury to pick up where he left off

Fleury is having a postseason for the ages, but it’s hard to believe momentum is simply going to carry over to a new series after such a lengthy break. Players are not simply going to pick up where they left off and play as if there’s no rust to shake off. The need to get to Fleury as early as possible.

What that means is getting traffic in front of the net, making him move, contesting rebounds, making him feel uncomfortable as much as possible and generating quality offensive chances.

The Caps can do is starting flinging pucks at the net and giving him easy saves. Getting 12 shots in the first period would be great, but not if they are all perimeter shots for easy saves that help bring Fleury's confidence back to where it was in the Western Conference Final.

Limit the turnovers

Turnovers are blood in the water for Vegas. The high-effort, high-speed style of play of the Golden Knights has caught several players off guard at points this postseason. No one can afford to be casual with the puck at any point in this game because Vegas has a knack for turning those turnovers into goals.

Winning Game 1 on the road will be hard enough without giving the Golden Knights at any help.

Shut down the top line

Only three players have reached double digits in points for the Golden Knights in the playoffs: Jonathan Marchessault (18), Reilly Smith (16) and William Karlsson (13). What do these three have in common? They all play on Vegas’ top line. To compare, the Caps have seven players in double digits.

Much has been made of Vegas’ offensive depth and their ability to roll four lines, but the play of Fleury in net has really masked how much this team relies on its top line for offense. The Caps need to get Dmitry Orlov and Matt Niskanen on the ice against them and focus on shutting them down. Force the Golden Knights to win with their other three lines and see if they can.

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Need to Know: Redskins will have a lot of starter stability in 2018

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Need to Know: Redskins will have a lot of starter stability in 2018

Here is what you need to know on this Monday, May 28, 15 days before the Washington Redskins start minicamp.  

Note: I am vacationing in the Outer Banks this week. In this space I’ll be presenting some of the most popular posts of the last few months. I hope you enjoy these “best of” presentations and I’ll see you folks when I get back. 

Stability at the top of the depth chart

This post was originally published on March 23 Note that this was prior to the draft.

A Redskins defense that ranked 27thin total defense and was dead last against the run is likely to return nine or 10 of the players who were the primary starters in 2017. The Washington defense, which was 16thoverall and 27thrunning the ball, will certainly return seven starters and could have eight the same as last year. 

I’m sure that this will alarm many Redskins fans, but it shouldn’t. Before getting into that, let’s look at the changes. 

On defense, the nine starters who are assured of returning are DE Stacy McGee, DL Jonathan Allen, OLB Preston Smith, OLB Ryan Kerrigan, ILB Zach Brown, ILB Mason Foster, CB Josh Norman, S Montae Nicholson, and S D.J. Swearinger. 

As of right now, a tenth returning starter has to be penciled in at nose tackle. Yes, if the season started today it would be Ziggy Hood at nose tackle again. More on that in a minute.

The only starting spot that is certain to turn over is the cornerback opposite Norman. Even though Bashaud Breeland’s contract agreement with the Panthers fell through due to a failed physical he is much more likely to lad on another NFL team than he is to return to the Redskins. 

It is impossible to think that the Redskins will not do something to address the nose tackle position, whether it’s in the draft or in free agency. Then again, it’s impossible to believe they have run the 3-4 defense since 2010 without coming up with a long-term solution at the nose. (Udate: Of course, they did this in the draft when they took Daron Payne and Tim Settle).

On offense, the seven starters certain to return are WR Josh Doctson, WR Jamison Crowder, OT Trent Williams, C Chase Roullier, RG Brandon Scherff, RT Morgan Moses, and TE Jordan Reed. RB Samaje Perine could be an eighth returning starter depending on if the Redskins take a running back early in the draft. 

The new starters will be QB Alex Smith, WR Paul Richardson, and someone at left guard. 

Having between 16 and 18 returning starters from a team that went 7-9 in 2017 may not be enough turnover for some fans. That’s not a completely unreasonable point of view. However, there is a such thing has having too much churn in your starting lineup and some stability for the Redskins may be a good thing this year. 

They had five new starters on defense last year and a new defensive coordinator. They also had a new coordinator on offense along with two new wide receivers and, by midseason, changes in the starters at running back and center. This is not counting all of the on-the-fly changes that had to be made due to injuries. 

Continuing to make changes in the starting lineup is not always a recipe for success. Sometimes you just need to pick a group of players and, to the extent that you can in the free agency-salary cap world of the NFL, stick with them. Sure, you have to address weakness like nose tackle and possibly running back and fill holes created by free agency departures. However, it is often better to give a player time to acclimate to a system and, especially with a rookie, time to learn the fine points of the game.

Tearing things down and starting over again after a mediocre season is a recipe for, well, more mediocre seasons. 

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page, Facebook.com/TandlerNBCSand follow him on Twitter  @TandlerNBCSand on Instagram @RichTandler