Redskins

Chiefs have rough history of starting quarterbacks

Chiefs have rough history of starting quarterbacks

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) The Chiefs are turning away from a former seventh-round draft pick whose career is spiraling toward ignominy, and putting the offense in the hands of a former first-round draft pick whose own career thus far has been a disappointment.

Matt Cassel is out. Brady Quinn is in.

Nobody is quite sure whether the Chiefs will be any better off when they host the Oakland Raiders on Sunday, but what's clear is that the quarterback situation in Kansas City is dire.

It's been that way for years, too.

The reasons for the quarterback conundrum range from the Chiefs' inability to develop their own prospects to their refusal to pick one early in the draft. The result has been this motley collection of starters over the past five years: Tyler Thigpen, Damon Huard, Brodie Croyle, Tyler Palko and Kyle Orton, along with Cassel and Quinn.

Kansas City has selected just one quarterback in the first 100 picks since 1992, when Matt Blundin - Remember him? Didn't think so - was the Chiefs' second-round choice.

They haven't picked one in the first round since Todd Blackledge in 1983.

The failure of the Chiefs to pick a high-profile quarterback early in the draft resulted in years or fan animosity directed at former general manager Carl Peterson, and even more at current GM Scott Pioli, who acknowledged that upgrading the position is a priority.

``There's a lot of issues,'' Pioli said, ``and that position is one of them.''

Pioli doesn't have to look far for a blueprint in drafting a quality quarterback, or one early in the draft: The Kansas City Royals have been pretty good at it.

The Chiefs' parking lot neighbors chose outfielder Bubba Starling with their first-round pick last summer, and doled out enough money to persuade the highly recruited prep quarterback to eschew a scholarship offer from Nebraska to patrol a minor-league outfield for them.

Then there was the Royals' memorable 1979 draft.

With their fourth-round pick, they chose a hard-throwing right-hander out of Pittsburgh's Central Catholic High School. Dan Marino nearly signed with Kansas City before taking a scholarship offer from Pittsburgh, and would go on to have a Hall of Fame career with the Dolphins.

When the Royals' pick rolled round in the 18th round, they took an outfielder from Granada Hills High School in Northridge, Calif., who had a decent bat and big upside. John Elway wound up going to Stanford, though, and then had a Hall of Fame career with the Broncos.

Incidentally, the Chiefs drafted Clemson quarterback Steve Fuller in the first round the same year. He was 19-23 as a starter over parts of seven seasons in Kansas City and Chicago.

Why is so much value placed on drafting a quarterback in the first round? Wasn't Tom Brady picked in the sixth round, and Tony Romo not drafted at all?

It's a fair argument, sure. But of the 32 starters in the NFL (if Blaine Gabbert goes Sunday for Jacksonville), 24 are former first-round picks - including Quinn and his counterpart on Sunday, the Raiders' Carson Palmer.

Three more were selected in the second or third round.

Five of the first six quarterbacks taken this year are starting, and Brock Osweiler - the one who isn't - is backing up Peyton Manning in Denver. Not a bad gig.

What's more, 20 of those starters were drafted by their current team, and two others - the Giants' Eli Manning and the Chargers' Philip Rivers - were swapped on draft day.

``There's nobody that has a bigger impact than the quarterback,'' Chiefs coach Romeo Crennel acknowledged in announcing his QB change this week. ``That impacts the whole team. You look at it and decide what you're going to do and go forward with it.''

It's not like every quarterback chosen in the first round pans out.

The only one take ahead of Quinn in the 2007 class was LSU's JaMarcus Russell, who went first overall to Oakland and was out of the league after three forgettable seasons.

Quinn certainly hasn't lived up to expectations, either.

He went 3-9 as a starter in Cleveland, where his completion rate was just 52.1 percent, and where he threw 11 interceptions against 10 touchdowns. Quinn eventually was dealt to the Broncos and signed in Kansas City this offseason as a free agent, where he was expected to back up Cassel.

Now, he's getting the start on Sunday against the Raiders.

So the Chiefs have a first-round draft pick starting at quarterback after all.

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Redskins activate running back Byron Marshall for Week 11, release wide receiver Brian Quick

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Redskins activate running back Byron Marshall for Week 11, release wide receiver Brian Quick

On Saturday the Washington Redskins announced their activation of running back Byron Marshall off of the injured reserve list. Marshall is eligible to play in Week 11 against the Houston Texans.

To make space on the roster, the Redskins also released wide receiver Brian Quick.

The move to add Marshall back on the 53-man roster is not too surprising. Earlier this week Samaje Perine was ruled out for Week 11 with a calf injury. Only Adrian Peterson and Kapri Bibbs were the healthy backs left on the active roster. Chris Thompson is still not available to play.

Before the season even started Marshall was placed on the IR with a sprained ACL and MCL. Those injuries occuring in the second preseason game of the season.

In his second season with Washington, Marshall has only played in four games. Don't expect him to see significant time against the Texans behind Peterson and Bibbs, either. It will probably just be some fill-in opportunities in the backfield. At worst, he sees a notable amount of snaps if one of the two gets dinged up.

The release of Quick comes with Trey Quinn coming back this week as well. Placed on waivers, Quick only had three catches for 18 yards through six games for the Redskins. 

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Maryland goes toe to toe with Ohio State, but ultimately falls to the Buckeyes

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Maryland goes toe to toe with Ohio State, but ultimately falls to the Buckeyes

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- Relentlessly zipping up and down the field, ninth-ranked Ohio State and upstart Maryland were racking up yards and points at a dizzying pace.

Finally, the Terrapins were presented with the chance to end it -- one way or another.

A gutsy decision by Maryland interim coach Matt Canada did not achieve the desired results, and the Buckeyes avoided one of the most stunning upsets in this college football season by squeezing out a 52-51 victory in overtime on Saturday.

After a 5-yard touchdown run by Dwayne Haskins gave the Buckeyes a seven-point lead to start overtime, Tayon Fleet-Davis scored for the Terrapins. Canada opted to keep his offense on the field to attempt a 2-point conversion, and Tyrrell Pigrome's pass to Jeshaun Jones was off target .

"It was a gut call," Canada said. "I felt like they were scoring, we were scoring. We had the ball, we had to make one play to win. Obviously it didn't work. I wasn't trying to be aggressive. I was just trying to win."

After watching his defense allow 535 yards and seven touchdowns, Ohio State coach Urban Meyer understood why Canada opted to win it right there.

"I would have probably done the same thing if I was their coach, the way they were gaining yards on us," Meyer said. "I'm relieved we won."

Favored by 14 points, Ohio State (10-1, 7-1 Big Ten, No. 10 CFP) trailed by two touchdowns in the third quarter and 45-38 with under two minutes left before rallying.

The victory kept the Buckeyes in the hunt for the Big Ten title and a spot in the College Football Playoff. Ohio State concludes the regular season next week in a game against Michigan that will decide the Big Ten East winner.

After describing the performance of his defense as "alarming," Meyer said, "But we won. Let's go back to work and get ready for next week."

The Buckeyes never led until overtime against the gritty Terrapins (5-6, 3-5), who have made the most of a season dedicated to teammate Jordan McNair, who died of heatstroke in June. The players teamed together under the guidance of Canada, who maintained his role of offensive coordinator after taking over for head coach DJ Durkin, who was placed on administrative leave in August, reinstated on Oct. 30 and fired on Oct. 31.

On this day, the Terps traded blows with one of the best teams in the nation, and stuck in it to the end.

"I wish we had been a little bit better on the last play," Canada said. "It's a tough day. We put a lot into this."

Pigrome was making his first start of the season after Kasim Hill sustained a season-ending knee injury last week. He went 6 for 13 for 181 yards.

Haskins ran for three touchdowns and was 28 for 38 for 405 yards and three TDs. Ohio State finished with a whopping 688 yards, including 203 on the ground by J.K. Dobbins.

All that offense meant nothing until Pigrome's pass went about six inches wide of his intended target.

"For us to stop them on a 2-point conversion, a whole bunch of emotions just came out of me," Haskins said. "All that grit, all that adversity we faced in this game, to come back on top just meant everything for myself and my teammates."

Maryland freshman Anthony McFarland had touchdown runs of 81 and 75 yards in the first quarter and finished with 298 yards rushing -- seven short of the school's single-game record.

The Terps took a 45-38 lead when Chigoziem Okonkwo recovered a fumble by McFarland in the end zone with 1:41 left. Haskins then orchestrated a 50-yard, beat-the-clock drive that ended with a 3-yard touchdown pass to Binjimen Victory with 40 seconds remaining.