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The College World Series was won by...

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The College World Series was won by...

From Comcast SportsNet
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) -- Arizona coach Andy Lopez celebrated the 20th anniversary of his first national championship by winning his second. It was 1992 when Lopez brought unheralded Pepperdine to the College World Series and beat Cal State Fullerton in the championship game. Arizona's sweep of South Carolina in the CWS finals -- completed with Monday night's 4-1 victory -- was not nearly as stunning as what Pepperdine accomplished two decades ago. The Wildcats (48-17) were the hottest thing going in college baseball the last six weeks. But believe Lopez when he says he's soaked up the journey to this title more than he did in winning the first one. The two decades between titles showed him how elusive championships can be. "When I was 38 years old and I showed up in Omaha and we won the national championship, I had no clue," he said. "I was a young guy, my kids were all little guys and I was trying to see if I could figure out if I could survive in this profession. More than ever I do have an appreciation." The Wildcats ended South Carolina's two-year run of dominance at the College World Series and rewarded Lopez for persevering through the hard times that came with rebuilding the downtrodden program he took over 11 years ago. Lopez thought he had a title-caliber team in 2008, but the Wildcats lost a crushing three-game super regional at Miami that he laments to this day. He was devastated again in 2009 when his team failed to make the national tournament. A strong recruiting class two years ago formed the core of the team that won Arizona's first national championship since 1986, and fourth overall. "They've just been a joy," said Lopez, flanked by his key players. "I mean, how many times have I told you I love suiting up with you guys? Said it today before the game. And I really do, I like suiting up with young guys that go to class, go to study hall, hustle on the field, clean up the clubhouse on their own. "I'm extremely, extremely fortunate to be in this profession and work with young people like this." Arizona used strong pitching on consecutive nights to sweep the Gamecocks. James Farris, who hadn't pitched since June 3, and Mathew Troupe combined to limit the Gamecocks to three hits a night after Konner Wade threw his third straight complete game in a 5-1 win. Brandon Dixon's tie-breaking double started a three-run ninth inning for Arizona on Monday. Dixon, who entered the game as a defensive replacement in the sixth inning, sent a grounder down the third-base line past LB Dantzler's outstretched glove for his first hit of the CWS. Tyler Webb relieved Matt Price (5-5), and Trent Gilbert drove in his second and third runs of the game with a two-out single that broke open the game. "Coach Lopez means the world to us, and we're so happy we brought joy back to his life in coaching," CWS Most Outstanding Player Robert Refsnyder said. Refsnyder, one of four juniors who earned All-Pac 12 honors this season, said he knew the disappointment in 2008 and 2009 took a toll on Lopez. "You could tell that he was fed up with baseball and trying to teach young people to go to class and study hall and take care of your business off the field," Refsnyder said. "You could see his frustration. But Lopez gave us, gave myself and the junior class this year, the tools to be successful." South Carolina (49-20) had been trying to become the first team since the Southern California dynasty of the early 1970s to win three national titles in a row. "We battled as hard as we could, but they did a little bit better than we did," Gamecocks coach Ray Tanner said. "Though we're disappointed tonight, I'm not disappointed in my players. We battled awful hard. We made a run, got to the postseason and got back out here. We got in the losers' bracket and got back to the finals." Right fielder Adam Matthews said he never envisioned the run the Gamecocks made. "Obviously, that's the goal of every college baseball team," he said. "When you're recruited to a big program like the University of South Carolina, it's an honor. And you get there and your goal is to get to Omaha -- and further, to win the national championship. "To do that twice and be in a position this year to do it again, it's been unbelievable. It's been a lot of fun. We had a great run." Lopez became the second coach to win a Division I baseball title at two schools. Augie Garrido was the first, winning three at Cal State Fullerton and two at Texas. Lopez took over a program that had gone to the NCAA regionals just once in the previous eight years. He came within that one win of getting to the CWS in 2008, then took a step backward in 2009 when the Wildcats didn't make the national tournament. "On paper the 08 team is probably as good, if not better, because of their bullpen," Lopez said. "But it's not the first team that wins. I came here in 98 as the No. 1 seed with Florida, and the seventh seed in 92, and won in 92 but didn't win in 98. "It's not the best team that wins, it's the hottest team, and these guys got hot at the right time." The Wildcats won 18 of their last 20 games, including their final 11. Down three runs in the bottom of the ninth, South Carolina loaded the bases against Troupe (6-1) on two walks and a single. With one out, Tanner English sent a line drive up the middle that second baseman Gilbert gloved. Gilbert rushed to the bag to double off Dantzler, but Dantzler got back just in time. Grayson Greiner then flied out to right fielder Refsnyder on a 2-1 pitch, sparking a rush of Arizona players to the middle of the field for the celebratory pile-on. "We were extremely fortunate to get away with this victory," Lopez said. Dixon, batting .242 for the season, had been 0 for 7 with three strikeouts in his previous CWS at-bats. As usual, he replaced first baseman Joseph Maggi in the middle innings and got his opportunity after Refsnyder singled leading off the ninth. Farris and Michael Roth engaged in a pitcher's duel through the first seven innings. Farris left with two out in the eighth after allowing one run on two hits. "Farris had a great start for Arizona," South Carolina's Adam Matthews said. "He was working away most of the night. Of course we wanted to hit better, but you have got to give credit where credit's due."

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Sekou Doumbouya visits Wizards hoping to sell them on his defense

Sekou Doumbouya visits Wizards hoping to sell them on his defense

WASHINGTON -- The Wizards hosted one of their final prospect workouts in anticipation of the June 20 NBA Draft on Friday, as six players battled in three-on-three drills with every member of Washington's front office and coaching staff in sight. But behind the glass wall of the dining lounge at the Wizards' practice facility at St. Elizabeth's was the player everyone wanted to see.

Sekou Doumbouya, who is projected to land in the lottery on draft night, made a visit to Washington to speak with Wizards personnel. He did not participate in the workout, but through face-to-face interviews gave the Wizards an up-close look at a player who may or may not be on the board when they are on the clock with the ninth overall pick.

Doumbouya is the youngest player in the draft at just 18 years old, with his birthday not until late December. He is originally from Guinea but played professional basketball in France. Given his age and the fact he played in a second-tier league before making the leap to the NBA, Doumbouya holds some mystery as a prospect.

In his meetings with teams, Doumbouya has tried to hammer home one point in particular.

"My defense," he said. "I can play everywhere [because] if you play defense, you can play everywhere in the league."

Defense certainly stands out when it comes to Doumbouya's potential. He is 6-foot-9 with a reported 7-foot-2 wingspan. At his age, he could keep growing. And at that size, he has the mobility to guard multiple positions, force turnovers and maybe even block some shots.

The Wizards need help with just about every area of their defense. They were 27th in defensive rating last season and 29th in points allowed. They couldn't defend the perimeter or the lane, allowing the fourth-highest three-point percentage (37%) and the fifth-most three-point makes (12.1/g), while also allowing more field goals within five feet of the rim than any team (22.1/g) and the third-highest percentage (64.2%) in that range. 

Doumbouya projects as the type of defensive anchor who could help in a variety of ways. He could step out to guard three-point shooters while also clogging lanes to the basket with his length.

The questions for Doumbouya center around how NBA-ready he is at his age and experience, and what his ceiling will ultimately be on the offensive end. Doumbouya, though, believes he can be especially effective in transition.

"Fastbreak," he said when listing his strengths. "I love running [the floor]."

Whether Doumbouya will be available at the ninth pick depends on who you ask. Most mock drafts have him at nine or lower, but his athleticism and versatility could entice a team that picks before the Wizards.

The Hawks, whom Doumbouya met with the day after seeing the Wizards, are a team to watch. They have the eighth, 10th and 17th picks in the first round, so they can afford to take a risk. They could snag Doumbouya at No. 8, then go with a safer pick or two with their other selections.

But there is a very good chance Doumbouya is the best player available when the Wizards get set to make their pick. If he does, defense will be his biggest selling point.

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Mystics’ Natasha Cloud holds strong on media blackout amid gun reform calls

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Mystics’ Natasha Cloud holds strong on media blackout amid gun reform calls

Washington Mystics guard Natasha Cloud spoke for her team Friday night after their loss to the Seattle Storm and was the only player who did, following through on her promise for a “media blackout.”

“We’re talking about the loss of a game. There’s a lot more losses going on within our community, especially within this community, Ward 8,” Cloud said. “So we as a team want to only bring light to the issues going on within this community, and that is the violence around kids going to school.”

Before Friday’s game against the Storm, Cloud said she and the team had decided she “will be speaking for the entire team” tonight and would not be taking any basketball questions.

Cloud’s stand came after she announced on Instagram Thursday night that she was upset about recent gun violence incidents at Hendley Elementary School, which is less than two miles from where the Mystics practice and play.

Hendley Elementary was placed on lockdown Wednesday as a bullet went through the upper lobby window --  the second shooting incident in two weeks. As a result, the school’s field day was canceled.

Cloud then took to Instagram and her more than 24,000 followers to challenge Ward 8 representative Trayon White and D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser to talk to her and make a change.

"Our kids can't even feel safe to go to school right now!" Cloud said. "What are we doing?"

She continued, "And let me tell you something else, Tray, Mayor Bowser. If I don't get a response by tomorrow morning with a solution and/or a sit-down for a solution, because y'all have had a month now to figure this out, we have a rematch of the WNBA Finals tomorrow (June 14th). I will be sure to use all of my media privileges as a blackout and I will only discuss this topic until it gets fixed."   

The Mystics' organization said in a statement it "respects the right of our players to speak out in a manner that promotes positive dialogue."

“Together, we aspire to work with civil leaders and elected officials to find ways to better the communities where we play,” the team said before the game.

“Mayor Bowser went to the community on Thursday evening to meet with community leaders, their MPD Captain and outreach staff to discuss their concerns and talk about recent incidents. That dialogue will continue as we work to end the senseless violence that has been fueled by the ­unfortunate presence of too many illegal guns," the mayor's office said in a statement.

Head coach Mike Thibault said postgame that his “only comment” about it is that the team wants to be “part of the solution, not part of the problem.”

“So if we’re going to have our players talk about it and they want to talk about it, then my thoughts to them is that you have to follow up and be part of the process, to do those things. We’re here in Ward 8 to be a part of the community, and we’re having those kids from the schools come here … That’s got to be an ongoing thing, that cannot be a one-off thing,” Thibault added.