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Delany: Big Ten 'inactive but alert' on expansion

Delany: Big Ten 'inactive but alert' on expansion

NEW YORK (AP) The Big Ten's guideline for conference expansion is ``inactive, but alert.''

The league unexpectedly transformed the landscape of major college sports again last month when it announced Rutgers and Maryland would be joining. As usual with conference realignment, the move triggered others and speculation more could be coming.

``I would describe our position as being inactive, but alert,'' Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany said Thursday after he appeared on a panel with Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike Slive and Big East Commissioner Mike Aresco. The discussion at the IMG Intercollegiate Athletics Forum was sponsored by SportsBusiness Journal.

``Monitoring the landscape is overused so we're trying to figure out what's the most apt way to describe where we are,'' Delany said. ``One hundred percent moving toward integration of the 14 (members). With schedules, branding and divisional alignment.

``We assessed staying where we were, and thought there was some risk to that long term,'' he added. ``We also understand that there's risk when you expand because you could get brand dilution.''

The Big Ten's move tipped the dominoes that led to the Atlantic Coast Conference turning to Louisville to replace Maryland.

Losing Rutgers and Louisville forced the Big East to add Tulane as a member in all sports and East Carolina for just football, then Conference USA had to make moves to replace those two schools.

Slive said the SEC doesn't feel compelled to react to the Big Ten's latest expansion. He said he sensed that after Notre Dame announced in September it was moving from the Big East to the ACC, while keeping its football program independent, the shuffling would stop.

``I think each of us have to understand what our own respective needs are,'' he said. ``I did think we were probably stable for a while. My reaction was more that there's not as much stability as I thought there was.''

``We're comfortable at 14, but I would never say never. That doesn't mean we're active. If your foundation and philosophy is, when leave I want the SEC to be better than when I came, and ensure its financial future, its competitive future. Any thought about going beyond 14 would relate to whether or not it would enhance those two things.''

Aresco said the Big East is trying to stay prepared for anything. The conference has undergone a massive overhaul in the past two seasons and is trying to re-invent itself as a coast-to-coast, 12-team football conference, with Boise State and San Diego State entering next season. The Big East is also trying to land a new television contract. The negotiations were stalled when Rutgers and Louisville announced they were leaving. Aresco said they have started up again.

``I'd like to see consolidation finally take hold so people can begin to build on what they have,'' he said.

``It's not an enjoyable part of the job, dealing with (realignment),'' he added. ``In the end we have to go about our business. We don't know whether there will be a period, a long period, of stability. No one knows.

``Uncertainty isn't good. We decided we're going to move forward. If something happens down the road, you adjust. We think the model is a viable model.''

The SEC doesn't have a problem with stability. The conference has been working on launching its own television network, similar to what the Big Ten and Pac-12 have started.

Slive said he hopes the league will have an announcement about the network in January.

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Rui Hachimura is a 'late bloomer' in basketball, but the Washington Wizards like that

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USA Today Sports

Rui Hachimura is a 'late bloomer' in basketball, but the Washington Wizards like that

Rui Hachimura was introduced to the sport of basketball at 13 years old after spending his childhood on the baseball diamond, emulating Ichiro Suzuki, as many kids in Japan do. Just eight years later, Hachimura has charted his own path as the first Japanese-born lottery pick in the NBA after the Washington Wizards drafted him at No. 9 overall.

That trajectory is important to note when considering Hachimura's age. He is 21 years old, which is on the older side for an NBA draft prospect in the age of one-and-dones. But, you could say he's only eight in basketball years.

That's not a technical term used by NBA front office executives, but the fact Hachimura is a "late bloomer" was one of the biggest selling points for the Wizards. That's how interim team president Tommy Sheppard described him on several occasions the night of the draft and the day after. And even majority owner Ted Leonsis referenced it when asked about the pick in an interview with the Washington Times over the weekend.

While reason may suggest a younger player has higher upside, the Wizards are looking beyond simple age. In Hachimura, they believe they have a player who could benefit from not having the year-round strain of AAU basketball in his past.

"When you come to the game a little bit later, maybe you don't have some bad habits that you accumulate. You don't have a lot of extra miles," Sheppard said. 

"Those kinds of things resonate with us. You have to be healthy to play in the NBA, and there are so many players in this particular draft that for whatever reason, there are a lot of sad faces tonight because I think medical held a lot of people back. He has a clean bill of health, and that's exciting to us."

Sheppard could have been referencing any number of prospects who carried the label as an injury risk into draft night. With the ninth overall pick, the Wizards took Hachimura over Duke's Cam Reddish, who has several red flags, injuries among them. In the second round, they passed on Oregon's Bol Bol, who had a stress fracture in his foot, in favor of Admiral Schofield.

But health isn't the only potential benefit of picking up the game at a later age. Sheppard alluded to the development of bad habits. He thinks Hachimura is more of a blank canvas for the coaching staff and that could work in their favor long-term.

Sheppard made a comparison for Hachimura that was interesting for several reasons.

"With [Raptors forward] Pascal Siakam, you see what happens when guys come to the game a little late and what he was able to do. It's not the same, but if you ask me of someone who's story his reminds me of, it could remind you of something like that," Sheppard said.

Siakam's name was invoked over and over during the pre-draft process but more often to draw a parallel for Sekou Doumbouya of France. Sheppard was more so comparing the development track for Hachimura than the playing style, but it holds some weight.

There have been some famous cases of late bloomers in NBA history. Hakeem Olajuwon, Tim Duncan and Joel Embiid reportedly didn't start playing basketball until high school.

Duncan may be a good example of avoiding bad habits, as he is considered one of the most fundamentally sound players of all time. Olajuwon might be the most skilled big man in NBA history, and Embiid has a chance to become an all-time great.

What gives the Wizards hope that Hachimura will reach his potential and someday enjoy breakout success like Siakam has is his work ethic. The Wizards did deep background research on Hachimura, including through discussions with his college coach, Mark Few of Gonzaga.

They believe they found something in Hachimura that other teams may have overlooked.

"The things that you hope for and that you're optimistic about, they seem to be there. So, we're excited about that," Sheppard said. "It's really up to Rui and how bad do you want to be good?"

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US in the World Cup quarterfinals after 2-1 win over Spain

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US in the World Cup quarterfinals after 2-1 win over Spain

REIMS, France -- Megan Rapinoe converted a pair of penalty kicks and the United States set up a much-anticipated quarterfinal meeting with host France at the Women's World Cup with a 2-1 victory over Spain on Monday.

Rapinoe's first came in the seventh minute to the cheers of the U.S. supporters melting in temperatures that reached nearly 90 degrees at the Stade Auguste-Delaune. They were quieted a short time later when Jennifer Hermoso tied it up for Spain with the first goal the Americans had allowed in France.

Video review was used to confirm a foul on Rose Lavelle that gave the pink-haired captain the game-winner in the 75th minute, spoiling Spain's spirited effort in its first knockout-round appearance at a World Cup.

"That’s World Cup-level grit right there," Rapinoe said on the Fox Sports broadcast. "You can’t replicate it. You can’t teach it. We told each other during the game we needed to go up a level. They (the matches) only get harder and more intense from here. Everybody’s playing for their lives."

The defending champions head to Paris to face France on Friday night. The French defeated Brazil 2-1 in extra time Sunday night, with Amandine Henry scoring the game-winner in the 107th minute.