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Div. II Chaminade upsets Texas 86-73 in Maui

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Div. II Chaminade upsets Texas 86-73 in Maui

LAHAINA, Hawaii (AP) De'Andre Haskins scored 32 points to lead Division II Chaminade to an 86-73 upset of Texas on Monday night, 30 years after the tiny school made its mark on college hoops with its famous upset over top-ranked Virginia.

The win was just Chaminade's seventh at the Maui Invitational since the tournament started in 1984. The host team has lost 76 at the tournament in that span.

Haskins also had nine rebounds as the Silverswords (2-2) turned a tight game in the first half into a blowout. Kevin Hu, a Taiwanese freshman, scored 16 points in 14 minutes off the bench.

Texas (2-1) shot 46.4 percent for the game after making just one of eight 3-pointers in the first half. The Longhorns finished with 18 turnovers compared with just 10 assists, and made less than 57 percent of its free throws.

Chaminade led at halftime after battling back from two separate deficits of seven or more points each. The Silverswords fell behind 8-0 after missing their first 10 shots.

Chaminade picked Texas apart in the second half, not allowing the Longhorns to score consecutive baskets until less than 7 minutes remained in the game. A pull-up jumper from Hu with 6:23 left gave Chaminade a 19-point lead at 64-45.

Texas pulled to within nine on a 3-pointer from Julien Lewis with 2:16 left, but could get no closer. In the closing minutes, Texas had flashes of superior play, generating turnovers with pressure and stopping basic possessions, but the effort meant little by then.

When Chaminade upset Virginia, it was an 800-student NAIA school and didn't even have its own gym.

Today, the Catholic school a few miles from the beaches of Waikiki has 1,200 students.

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Oskar Garcia can be reached on Twitter athttp://twitter.com/oskargarcia .

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Doc Rivers explains what he learned from coaching his son, Austin

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Doc Rivers explains what he learned from coaching his son, Austin

The deal that sent Austin Rivers from the L.A. Clippers to the Washington Wizards this offseason was no ordinary NBA trade. Rivers was traded from the team coached by his father and that added an element no one had experienced before.

The Rivers family were the first father-and-son combination of coach and player in NBA history. Austin spoke in detail about his side of things after joining Washington, saying it was time for a fresh start to further his career. Doc opened up about it recently at Coaching U, a summer program that develops coaches from around the country.

Doc explained what he learned from coaching his son that can be applied to coaching any team in any sport. His takeaways give a fascinating look into a situation that was truly unique to the NBA.

Watch the video right here:

One quote that stands out in his speech was about supporting players.

"The one thing Austin could do when he showed up for a game, what did he know? He knew the coaches, or the head coach had his back because the head coach was his dad. And so, if you're coaching your team and you can get every single player on your team to have that feeling, you're going to be successful."

For more on Austin's perspective, read this story from his introductory press conference in July.

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Key Caps questions: Who will play on the team's third defensive pair?

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Key Caps questions: Who will play on the team's third defensive pair?

The dog days of summer are officially here, but it's never too hot to talk some hockey.

Capitals correspondent JJ Regan is here to help you through the offseason doldrums as he discusses key questions facing the Caps for the upcoming season as Washington prepares to defend its title for the first time in franchise history.

Today's question: What will be the team's primary third defensive pairing?

Barring any PTOs or breakout performances in training camp, we can reasonably assume Brooks Orpik, Christian Djoos and Madison Bowey are going to be the three players battling it out to be on the third pair.

General manager Brian MacLellan went through some salary cap gymnastics to get Orpik back for next season at a much smaller cap hit, Djoos played 22 playoff games in the Caps’ Stanley Cup run and Bowey was signed to a one-way, two-year contract for $1 million per year. Clearly, all three are expected to be on the Caps’ roster next season and play a role, but that role will be limited considering the top-four is pretty much set with Michal Kempny-John Carlson and Dmitry Orlov-Matt Niskanen.

Orpik will be 38 years old at the start of the season. His on and off-ice contributions are much greater than many were willing to acknowledge, but he was never a fast player and at his age, holding him to 60 games or fewer will make him a more effective player.

Djoos and Bowey are 24 and 23 respectively and, while both are ready for bigger roles, both are far from finished products. While they may be part of the future of Washington’s blue line, putting in two young, second-year players as their own pair is a risk.

But even if head coach Todd Reirden is not ready to turn the reins over to his two young defensemen just yet, he still needs to get both players plenty of playing time.

This is why Orpik may get a lot more playing time than many people think. The best thing for both Djoos and Bowey is for them to play. If you have concerns about them playing together, however, and neither is ready to supplant anyone in the top four, then you are going to see them cycle in and out of the lineup fairly frequently to play alongside Orpik.

That’s not to say we will never see a Djoos-Bowey pairing this season. They will probably have their chances and the better they look, the longer that pair will last. If they were ready, it would be a safe assumption that they would get the bulk of games together with Orpik serving more of a reserve role.

But a Djoos-Bowey pairing would be too vulnerable to opposing offenses at least at the start of the season and so we should expect a lot of Orpik.

While Reirden will work his defensive magic to bring Djoos-Bowey along as quickly as possible, I would anticipate Orpik-Djoos will see a majority of games this season as the team’s third defensive pairing.

Other key Caps questions: