Redskins

Early blitz carries Blues to 4-1 win over Jackets

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Early blitz carries Blues to 4-1 win over Jackets

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) Barret Jackman, Patrik Berglund and Vladimir Tarasenko each scored in the opening 14 minutes, Brian Elliott made 24 saves and the St. Louis Blues won their fourth straight game with a 4-1 victory over the Columbus Blue Jackets on Thursday night.

David Backes, who also had an assist, added an empty-netter. T.J. Oshie had two assists.

Derick Brassard scored for Columbus, which played on even terms over the final 46 minutes but couldn't overcome the early blitz. Steve Mason, who came on in relief of Sergei Bobrovsky after the early goals, stopped all 14 shots he faced.

The Blues took command and locked up the two points before a crowd of 11,155 could settle into its seats.

Just 2:19 in, Jackman almost lackadaisically wristed the puck on net from the boards near the blue line. It sailed past Jamie Langenbrunner and defenseman Tim Erixon, playing his first game for the Blue Jackets, who were tangled near the left hash. It continued on past a surprised Bobrovsky for Jackman's second of the year.

It was the third time that Bobrovsky, who has been solid in net most of this young season, has been victimized for a soft goal in the first minutes of the game.

St. Louis wasn't done.

The Blues went on a power play at the 10:06 mark when Vinny Prospal was called for a high stick - and 17 seconds later the puck was in the net again. This time Berglund took a drop pass from Oshie and rocketed a hard shot from the top of the left circle for his fourth of the season.

Soon after, Tarasenko took a pass from Alexander Steen, was hit by defensive James Wisniewski near the right hash and before hitting the ice got enough stick on the puck to get it past Bobrovski.

Tarasenko has been a revelation so far for the Blues, scoring five goals to go with four assists in seven games. He was the Blues' first-round pick, 16th overall, in the 2010 draft and has been brilliant in his debut season, leading all NHL rookies in goals.

That was it for Bobrovsky, who was replaced by Mason after facing just 11 shots.

The Blue Jackets came out harder in the second period, pulling to 3-1 on Derick Brassard's power-play goal - in between a series of fights. After Brassard lifted a high wrister for his first goal, there were two fights at once that resulted a Columbus power play.

But after building the early lead, the Blues were content to play solidly and not take any chances, while Columbus could never get the goal to draw within one.

NOTES: The game was the second of a franchise record-tying six-game homestand for Columbus. ... St. Louis LW Andy McDonald played despite a lower-body injury. He hit the side of the net on a wide-open empty-netter in the final minute, provoking some jeers from the crowd. ... The Blues opened a brief two-game, back-to-back road trip. They play at Detroit on Friday night. ... Blue Jackets winger Jonathan Audy-Marchessault made his NHL debut. ... The Blues came in leading the league in fewest shots allowed per game at 19.5. The Blue Jackets had 25.

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Rusty Miller can be reached athttp://twitter.com/rustymillerap

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When I knew: Redskins' Chris Thompson on his journey from untouchable runner to the NFL

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USA TODAY Sports

When I knew: Redskins' Chris Thompson on his journey from untouchable runner to the NFL

At some point, every sports fan has some form of the same dream. Play quarterback in the NFL. Roam centerfield in the Majors. Splash 3-pointers in the NBA. Whack forehands at Wimbledon.

Along the way, most of us realize we peaked as kids. There's no hope of climbing that mountain or ever coming close, though on certain days and for fleeting moments... Nah, not happening.

That comprehension often comes early in life. For true romantics or delusional souls, perhaps a decade or two later.

For others, the dream turns into reality. Whether they stormed the courts as prodigies or developed their craft over time, a moment occurred when thoughts shifted. When they recognized they might be different. This series of interviews with local professional athletes focus on that moment.

Next up, Redskins running back Chris Thompson

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I think for me it truly started in high school. As a kid, I was always faster than everybody. When I played Little League ball that was no problem for me. I was more nervous about getting tackled. I didn’t want to play.

I had one Little League season -- I think I was in fifth grade I believe -- where I was tackled one time the whole season. That was in the championship game. Other than that, every time I touched [the ball] it was a touchdown.

When I got in high school, I was on varsity since my freshman year. I started at running back my sophomore year, playing against older guys, against teams that were bigger and better than us. I was able to perform well. I was like, alright I can probably make something out of this. That’s when I really got a good feeling about [my ability].

As far as making it to the NFL, honestly, it didn’t hit me until my sophomore year [at Florida State].

We got a new running back coach, Eddie Gran. He just started talking to me, teaching me about what I needed to be good at to make it to the league and be able to play for a long time because he helped produce a lot of running backs that made it (Deuce McAllister, Ronnie Brown, etc).

Just being around him and learning from him really helped me and gave me the confidence that I could make it to the NFL and be a very good player.

Then you reach the NFL. At what point did you think you got this?

That was really the toughest challenge, realizing (I could play in the NFL). It didn’t really hit me until my fourth year.

My rookie year it didn’t really work out too well (Lost role as the primary kick returner after four games before suffering a torn left labrum).

(Released and then signed to) the practice squad my second year so I was doubting everything at that point. Just being cut made me doubt my ability. Really one of the lowest parts of my entire football career.

My third year I knew it was my job because Coach (Jay) Gruden told me that. I could do my job, but excelling and going beyond expectations was really around my fourth year when it hit me. I finished that season out healthy. My first full season. (Thompson played all 16 games for the only time in his career to date, finishing with 49 receptions and 705 yards from scrimmage.)

After that, I was able to go into the offseason feeling really healthy for the first time. Feeling like myself once again like the senior year of college version of myself. As you could see last year (2017), I had a wonderful year.

Any specific moment in the NFL that had you thinking, I got this?

We were playing against the Eagles Week 16 in my third year to win the division. I think the first play I came in was in the red zone and I ended up scoring a touchdown on “choice” route against Kiko Alonso, who is a linebacker I have a lot of respect for. That really gave me some confidence.

I had a few more plays where I was just running routes, kind of getting open during that game and a few more games. I was OK, if I can be consistent, keep catching the ball and keep getting open, I could really be great at this. Then the game started slowing down for me in my fourth year. Then I got more comfortable. I got way more patient in my routes. It was like, dang, dude, with your footwork and acceleration, you can really get open against these guys and make some plays.

The transcript was edited for length and clarity.

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With his rookie contract in rearview mirror, what's next for Redskins WR Jamison Crowder?

With his rookie contract in rearview mirror, what's next for Redskins WR Jamison Crowder?

ASHBURN — By now it's well-documented that the Washington Redskins' season did not go as planned, and you can say the same for fourth-year wide receiver Jamison Crowder.

Crowder, 25, was limited to just nine games due to a lingering ankle injury for most of the season, and then a separate late-December wrist injury. He finished the year with 29 catches for 388 yards, well off his career norms.

The Redskins have received plenty of production from Crowder (221 catches, 2,628 yards, 14 touchdowns) at a discounted price during his first few years in the NFL. That is about to change.

“I’m comfortable here,” Crowder said. “Obviously, I have a really high interest level in coming back. It’s going to be in discussion with my agent. There hasn’t really been much discussion as far as right now.”

Washington's 2015 fourth-round pick raced out of the gate in his NFL career setting a Redskins rookie record for receptions (59). Barring a contract extension in the next two months, Crowder will be free to sign with any team in March and there is no guarantee that he will return.

That would leave the Redskins even more desperate for proven options at wide receiver, arguably the most disappointing position on the team during a second straight 7-9 season.

Josh Doctson led Washington receivers with 44 receptions, the lowest total since 1998 when Michael Westbrook had a team-high 44 among the pack. Given that uncertainty at receiver, where Paul Richardson also missed most of the season with a shoulder injury, Crowder’s teammates want him back.

“Got to pay him,” running back Chris Thompson said. “I mean – that’s the business side of it. I really, really, really do hope that we can get him back. He’s been a key part of this offense since he’s been here. I’m excited for him. He’s really gonna help himself be in a better situation for him and his family and his kids and his future. He’s made a good resume for himself that he can make himself some really good money. I hope that it’s here.”

Crowder missed those seven games with a right ankle injury sustained in a Week 5 loss to the New Orleans Saints. He spent time in a walking boot. After three consecutive years of 59 catches or more, Crowder dropped to 29 receptions for 388 yards and two touchdowns.

“You want to keep the nucleus of the team together at all costs,” Pro Bowl left tackle Trent Williams said. “But it’s the NFL and it’s always easier said than done. I try not to get into the whole free agency deal because those guys got to make business decisions for them and their families.”

The Redskins could decide that slot receiver Trey Quinn, a seventh-round draft pick in 2018, could fill Crowder’s production at a much cheaper price and allow them to upgrade the position through the draft or free agency. But that will come at a risk.

Crowder has proven to be one of the league’s better slot receivers when healthy. Quinn was on IR twice with a high-ankle sprain as a rookie. Acknowledging that injuries to quarterbacks Alex Smith and Colt McCoy hurt the overall production of the group, can the Redskins really afford to let more talent leave the building at wide receiver?

Having completed the final year of his rookie contract, Crowder admitted the uncertainty of his future feels a little different.

"Yeah, I guess you could say it's a little weird. I just don't know, you know, what's going to happen right now. I just have to kind of wait and see what's going on."

Despite the unpredictable nature of Crowder's situation, he didn't mince his words on where his hopes lie going forward.

"I have a really high-interest level in coming back."

Brian McNally contributed to this story.

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