Football Team

2020 Fantasy Football: Tips for the perfect draft

Football Team

With the NFL season slowly creeping up, it's about time for Fantasy Football Drafts to begin.

No matter how much research is done or how many mock drafts you complete, nothing can mimic the stress and chaos of the official draft. One wrong move and you could be hearing how bad your team is from your co-workers, friends or even your family all season long. At the end of the night, you want to look at the draft board and smile, not feeling anxiety and regret.

In order to make that happen, there are some easy draft tips to follow that will help you dominate your league in the coming season no matter what draft pick you have.

Preseason rankings: Quarterbacks | Running Backs | Wide Receivers | Tight Ends | Defense/Special Teams | Top Rookies | 10 sleepers and breakouts | Tips for a perfect draft | Players to avoid drafting early
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1. Don't de-value running backs

As of late, the actual league has begun to overlook the importance of running backs. Many believe their production can be replaced. It may be true, and plenty of backups have easily had big games due to the system they're in, but you shouldn't think like that during your fantasy draft.

Really strong running backs are hard to come by. It's not like the receiver position where every NFL team has one or two that are viable starters. Only a few backs dominate the No. 1 position on the depth chart and avoid the dreaded "Running back by committee" label. Christian McCaffery and others have shown that they can do more than just run the ball, adding valuable points in the receiving game.

If a top tier running back is there, go for it.

 

2. A top tight end is worth it

As with the running back position, having a top tight end on your roster is rare. There are only a few that can really be relied upon to put up consistently great numbers week to week. Think Travis Kelce and George Kittle. It may seem strange to grab one of them in the very early rounds, but it's worth it.

The production a tight end of that caliber can give you is similar to a WR1. If you end up with a top wide receiver and one of the better tight ends, you have room to play around with the rest of your roster. 

3. Don't let projections fool you

Projections are nice because they can point you in the direction of what players could be in for a big season. Projections are bad because they can completely sway your draft decisions even though they are simply predictions. People say number never lie, but these do.

How many times have you looked at your lineup on Sunday and seen that you are projected to score 150 points, only to end with 40 after the 1 p.m. window? No? Just me?

Either way, don't let the projections be the number one reason you chose a player, they could end up being very off.

4. No need to go with the flow

Notice all your pals are taking wide receivers all of the sudden? Think you're missing something or they know something you don't? It's not true.

Don't get caught up in what others are doing, stick with the gameplan.

5. Pass on a kicker

Some say to take a kicker in the last round, but is that really worth it? Sure there are a few that are consistent, but that position is a guessing game almost every week depending on how the rest of the offense does.

Instead of drafting one initially, use the extra pick to take a player at a position that may need some extra depth. Then, following the draft, weigh the options and drop someone in place of a kicker when it comes time to set your lineup. It's easier to get by using the waiver wire for a kicker each week than it is a wide receiver or running back.

Preseason rankings: Quarterbacks | Running Backs | Wide Receivers | Tight Ends | Defense/Special Teams | Top Rookies | 10 sleepers and breakouts | Tips for a perfect draft | Players to avoid drafting early