series

Jason Wright explains why voting is so important to him

series

Washington Football Team president Jason Wright's passion for voting-rights activism stems from his family tree. 

Wright's middle name is 'Gomillion' - named in honor of Charles G. Gomillion, a voting-rights advocate who registered Blacks to vote in the South during the Jim Crow era. Gomillion eventually won a case before the Supreme Court that made gerrymandering illegal.

Decades later, Wright is now in a position of power and influence himself as Washinton's team president. And he's determined to use his status to make a change.

Download and subscribe to the Washington Football Talk podcast

"If I think of just my ancestors, they bled out for this right to vote," Wright said. "When I see so many other people whose lineage did the same but don't have the ability to vote or have some hindrance in the way, I think it's incumbent on all of us if we're in a space of influence to break down those barriers."

As an organization, the Washington Football Team has done its part in advocating the local community to exercise their right to vote. 

For several weeks, Washington held "DMVotes Turnout Tuesdays" at FedEx Field, giving residents of D.C., Maryland and Virginia the chance to register to vote.

This proved instrumental this past Tuesday, Oct. 13, the final day to register to vote in those three locations. When Virginia's online voter registration system crashed on the final day to sign up, area residents flocked to FedEx Field to register.

 

Wright is proud of the work the franchise has done with DMVotes but has even greater plans, too.

"Coming out of that, I can translate things into action. FedEx [Field] having a voting facility is one of those. But we're also doing other stuff around that," Wright said. "We are planning to feed voters in parts of the area that we know are going to have long lines. We're going to show up and provide to these folks because we know that's a part of it."

In the DMV, few things mean more to the local community than the Washington Football Team. Although the franchise is years removed from its glory days, there's no doubt that the nation's capital is still a football town.

Wright knows the impact on the community the organization has and is set on using that platform to encourage everyone in the area to exercise their fundamental right to vote in America.

"We're also going to have campaigns through radio, digital, of us as the team encouraging everyone to do their civic duty at this important time," Wright said. "As the Washington Football Team, we need to be productive members of this community. It's a non-partisan thing but a good thing for people to activate their right to vote."