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Golf Capsules

Golf Capsules

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. (AP) Tommy Gainey narrowly missed golf's magic number. He happily settled for a course-record 60 at Sea Island, and his first PGA Tour win Sunday in the McGladrey Classic.

Gainey became the fourth player this year to rally from at least seven shots behind in the final round to win on the PGA Tour. He made seven straight 3s on his way to a 29 on the back nine, and then had to wait more than two hours to see if Jim Furyk or anyone else could catch him.

Tournament host and Ryder Cup captain Davis Love III drove into the water on the 16th and made double bogey. Furyk made a 12-foot par save on the 17th hole to stay one shot behind, but he pushed his approach well right on the 18th and made his first bogey in 56 holes.

Gainey, a 37-year-old from South Carolina with a homemade swing who is known as ``Two Gloves'' for wearing black gloves on each hand, joined a long list of unlikely winners this year. He was seven shots behind going into the final round, and his 60 was nearly 9 1/2 shots better than the average score.

He wound up with a one-shot victory over David Toms, who closed with a 63.

Furyk shot a 69 to finish alone in third, a sour end to a season filled with bitter memories.

Gainey finished at 16-under 264 and earned $720,000, along with a trip to Kapalua in January for the Tournament of Champions and a two-year exemption on the PGA Tour.

Gainey went birdie-birdie-eagle-birdie in the middle of the back nine to soar into the lead and bring 59 into the picture, a score only five players have managed in PGA Tour history. He had a 20-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole that didn't have enough speed to hold its line.

Love lost his hope on the back nine with a three-putt bogey on the 14th, a bunker shot that banged off the pin and spun out of the cup for a potential eagle on the 15th, and then his tee shot on the 16th that was left all the way and found water. He shot a 71 and tied for fourth.

HANABANK CHAMPIONSHIP

INCHEON, South Korea (AP) - Suzann Pettersen won the HanaBank Championship for her ninth LPGA Tour title, beating Catriona Matthew with a 5-foot birdie putt on the third hole of playoff after blowing a big lead.

Seven strokes ahead of Matthew at the start of the round, Pettersen shot a 2-over 74 to finish at 11-under 205 on Sky 72 Golf Club's Ocean Course. The 43-year-old Matthew finished with a 67.

Pettersen, the Norwegian who also won the 2007 event, took a five-stroke lead over South Korea's So Yeon Ryu into the final round after opening with a course-record 63 and shooting a 68 on Saturday.

Matthew, from Scotland, had a two-stroke lead after Pettersen's double bogey on the par-3 12th. Pettersen birdied the par-4 14th and Matthew dropped a stroke on the par-4 16th to leave them tied at 11 under.

Defending champion Yani Tseng was third at 10 under after a 69.

PERTH INTERNATIONAL

PERTH, Australia (AP) - Bo Van Pelt won the Perth International, closing with a 4-under 68 for a two-stroke victory over American countryman Jason Dufner.

Van Pelt finished at 16-under 272 at Lake Karrinyup and earned $333,330 in the event sanctioned by the European and Australasian tours. Dufner, a two-time winner this year on the PGA Tour, shot a 69.

Spain's Alejandro Canizares was third at 11 under after a 68.

JACKSONVILLE OPEN

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. (AP) - Russell Henley won the Jacksonville Open for his second Web.com Tour victory of the year, beating B.J. Staten with a par on the first hole of a playoff.

Henley birdied the final hole of regulation for a 5-under 65 to match Staten at 10-under 270 on Dye's Valley Course at TPC Sawgrass. Staten finished with a 68, then had a double bogey on the playoff hole.

Henley earned $108,000 to jump from ninth to third on the money list with $365,366. The tournament was the final full-field event of the year. The top 60 on the money list qualified for the season-ending Web.com Tour Championship next week in McKinney, Texas. The final top 25 will earn 2013 PGA Tour cards.

Henley also won the Chiquita Classic last month in a playoff in North Carolina. Last year while still a student at Georgia, Henley won the tour's Stadion Classic on his college course.

Staten earned a spot in the finale, making $64,800 to go from 69th to 32nd on the money list with $141,521.

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Ravens kicker Justin Tucker named AFC Special Teams Player of the Week

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Ravens kicker Justin Tucker named AFC Special Teams Player of the Week

It's just Justin Tucker doing Justin Tucker things.

The Ravens' kicker has been named AFC Special Teams Player of the Week, the team announced Wednesday. This is the eighth time in his career he's been awarded the honor.

During the team's Week 3 27-14 win against the Denver Broncos, Tucker nailed not one, but two field goals from 52-yards out. He's made eight straight from beyond the 50.

Besides being the most accurate kicker in the history of the NFL, the 28-year-old has made 100 percent of the Ravens' extra point attempts. 

In 2016, JT became the ninth kicker in NFL history to kick three 50+ field goals in a single game and is the first kicker in NFL history to kick a field goal from 20-, 30-, 40-, 50- and 60-yards in a single game. 

On top of being a two-time Pro Bowler, he is the fastest kicker in NFL history to make 100 field goals and to reach the 500-point milestone. His longest field goal is 61-yards.

With the way things have been going for kickers in the NFL of late, Ravens fans can truly appreciate Tucker and his insane leg. 

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Bradley Beal and Otto Porter, Jr. offer advice for Kelly Oubre, Jr.

Bradley Beal and Otto Porter, Jr. offer advice for Kelly Oubre, Jr.

Wizards forward Kelly Oubre, Jr. doesn't need to look far to find a blueprint for success this season, the final year of his rookie scale contract. Both Bradley Beal and Otto Porter, Jr. were in the exact same situation, and while they were teammates with Oubre. Each of them knocked the test of a contract year out of the park.

Both Beal and Porter earned max deals from the Wizards after breakout seasons in contract years. Oubre, of course, would like to make a lot of money for himself. When asked to share advice for Oubre, Beal and Porter spoke their piece in different ways, but the message ultimately was much the same. 

Beal spoke in-depth and with his trademark even-keel approach. Porter was characteristically brief.

"Don't worry about it. It will take care of itself," Beal told NBC Sports Washington. "I'm not gonna sit here and say that it's easy to do because it's your brand, it's your life, it's your money... but I always say that with your money you are going to get rewarded and taken care of at the end of the day."

"Just continue to work hard and everything else will take care of itself," Porter said.

Beal sees some similarities in Oubre and Porter and not just because they play the same position as small forwards. Oubre, like Porter in the 2016-17 season, has to operate in a secondary role. Beal was a central focus of the offense in 2015-16, his contract year.

"It will be tough to do because you've gotta think [Oubre] is coming off the bench," Beal explained.

"I always use Otto as an example. Otto did everything he was supposed to do, everything coach asked him to, everything the organization asked him to and he got rewarded for it. It's plain and simple. His game is simple, honestly. I feel like Kelly can be the exact same way... It's just a matter of him staying level-headed and just not worrying about it too much."

If Oubre has any questions, Beal seems like the guy to go to. It's clear in talking about Oubre that Beal genuinely cares for him and his future.

Beal also cares for the future of the Wizards and would like Oubre to remain in Washington.

"Kelly is super-athletic. The sky is the ultimate limit for him," Beal said. "He is somebody who has star potential, somebody who we are crazy to think that other teams aren't going to try to go after him. We've gotta realize that."

Beal said he will do his part to help Oubre, if the fourth-year forward needs it. Having been there before, he feels like he can be a resource.

"He's like my little brother, so as much as I can I will try to keep him level-headed and try to not keep him focused on it. It's definitely easier said than done," Beal said.

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