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Virginia Tech's Edmunds brothers make NFL Draft history in first round

Virginia Tech's Edmunds brothers make NFL Draft history in first round

The most popular night in the NFL offseason took Dallas, Texas by storm Thursday. 

There were plenty of big storylines at the 2018 NFL Draft, held at AT&T Stadium, home of the Dallas Cowboys. 

Sure, Baker Mayfield being taken first overall by the Browns, Saquon Barkley joining Big Blue in the NFC East and a total of five quarterbacks coming off the board in the first round created plenty of buzz. 

But the story of the night belonged to a pair of brothers who carried on the NFL tradition within a small-town family from Danville, VA. 

Edmunds brothers, Tremaine and Terrell, became the first members of the same family to be drafted in the first round, per Elias Sports Bureau. 

The former Virginia Tech Hokies are set to join their big brother and current Saints running back, Trey, in the league next season. 

In what was a surprise to many, Tremaine fell to Buffalo at No. 16 after being listed as a projected top-10 pick. 

A bigger surprise, though? Terrell being selected by Pittsburgh at No. 28 after being projected by many to fall somewhere in the second round, or later. 

The biggest surprise of the evening? Steelers linebacker Ryan Shazier walking out on his own power after suffering a severe spinal injury in December to announce the team's 28th pick. 

Over Easter weekend earlier this month, the Edmunds family was generous enough to invite our crew at NBC Sports Washington to their Danville home. 

From visiting their old high school where they grew up playing football under their father as head coach to breaking down old footage from their early days playing pee-wee football, we dove into it all and put together a four-part web series. 

EDMUNDS FAMILY DOCUMENTARY:

Maryland native Frances Tiafoe takes Roger Federer to the brink; nearly forces U.S. Open stunner

Maryland native Frances Tiafoe takes Roger Federer to the brink; nearly forces U.S. Open stunner

GET TO KNOW MORE ABOUT FRANCES TIAFOE IN THE ABOVE VIDEO PLAYER

On Tuesday night, College Park, Md. native Frances Tiafoe nearly did the unthinkable.

19-year-old Tiafoe took five-time U.S. Open champion Roger Federer to a fifth and final round at Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing, N.Y. before Federer squeaked out the victory, 4-6, 6-2, 6-1, 1-6, 6-4.

Not only did Tiafoe take Federer the distance, but the highly touted American teen took the first set 6-4.

Federer, who has twice as many grand slam championships than Tiafoe has grand slam appearances, won the next two sets with relative ease.

Tiafoe, who began training at the Junior Tennis Champions Center in College Parl at four years old, could not be put away.

He won four of five break points, and only committed 49 unforced errors to Federer's 56. But Federer's 17 aces and 49 first-serve winners were too much for young upstart.

While Tiafoe exits the tournament with a loss, the five-set thriller against one of the greatest tennis players of all time, the Maryland native and breakout star continues on his meteoric trajectory.

Remembering Jim Vance, a Washington institution and the city's guiding light

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NBC Washington

Remembering Jim Vance, a Washington institution and the city's guiding light

Washington, D.C. is a city of great institution, and in its human form, there was no greater institution than Jim Vance. 

For 45 years -- the longest of any newscaster in the region -- Vance treated every Washingtonian with courtesy, respect and the ability to not just read the news, but talk with you about it. The latter is an important distinction in this city, one ruled by political grandstanding and ruthless social posturing.

On Saturday, the nation's capital lost its kindest, most charismatic and respected voice of news and information, as Vance passed away at the age of 75.

I am not writing this as an employee of NBC Universal, nor am I writing this as a former intern at NBC4.  I am writing this as the son of a Washingtonian. I am writing this as a 32-year old who was born and raised in Washington, D.C. Someone who took the local bus to high school every day, the same bus adorned with his NBC4 headshot.

I am writing this as someone who loves Washington, D.C. as not the seat of American politics, but the greatest local community in the country.

And Vance was the face and the voice of the local community.

But what made Vance great was not what he did, but how he did it.

Vance was as charming a newscaster as you will ever see. He was polite but direct. He could make you laugh and make you cry. He made you care about the community, whether you grew up on a metro line or simply spent a summer interning on one.

I did not know Jim Vance on a personal level. I met him on several occasions as an intern, and as incredible of a journalist as he was, what always shined was his urbane sophistication and truly warm demeanor.

He was the same person on television as he was in the newsroom, and was that very same person when you ran into him at the local florist. He was Washington D.C.'s guiding light. The city's voice of knowledge and community.

It's why despite hundreds of thousands of Washingtonians not knowing Jim Vance on a personal level, each and everyone felt like he was a part of their extended family.

We welcomed him into our houses every day.

We discussed the local happenings and important world issues.

We groaned when local teams were eliminated from the playoffs and shared imaginary yet all-too-real hi-fives when the teams won. 

He wasn't just a newscaster. He was a Washingtonian. He was the guy whose photo you saw on the wall at local delis and the guy who stood behind you in-line at the very same place. 

Death is human, but influence is forever. Jim Vance truly is a Washington institution, one that will never die.