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Illinois-Chicago beats Colorado State 64-55

Illinois-Chicago beats Colorado State 64-55

CHICAGO (AP) Gary Talton scored 20 points, including a perfect 12 for 12 from the free-throw line, and added five rebounds and five assists to lead Illinois-Chicago to its seventh straight victory by defeating Colorado State 64-55 on Saturday afternoon.

UIC (8-1) trailed 46-45 with 5:45 remaining after Wes Eikmeier hit a free throw for Colorado State. Seconds later, Will Simonton made a lay-up to give the Rams a 47-46 lead and Colorado State went on a 17-9 run from that point on to seal the victory.

Daniel Barnes scored 14 points, Marc Brown had 12 points and four rebounds and Josh Crittle chipped in with 10 for the Flames, which haven't suffered a loss since Nov. 16 when New Mexico beat them 66-59 in the Paradise Jam Tournament.

Greg Smith scored 20 points and grabbed nine rebounds for Colorado State (6-2) and Pierce Hornung had eight points and 10 rebounds.

Best places within driving distance to get out of Washington, D.C. on July 4th

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Best places within driving distance to get out of Washington, D.C. on July 4th

America’s birthday is just around the corner. The Fourth of July is arguably the most anticipated event of the summer and with most having the day off to celebrate, you’ll need a place to do so.

The most obvious choice would be to spend July 4th on the National Mall, but with the anticipation of record-breaking heat, tourists and general overcrowding, Washington, D.C. may not be the most ideal location to spend the holiday.

Here are the best places to get out of Washington, D.C. on July 4th within driving distance:

The Winery at Bull Run: Manassas, Virginia

If you’re looking to spend your Fourth of July at a winery, this is the place for you. The Winery at Bull Run is adjacent to Manassas National Battlefield Park, the site of the Battle of Bull Run, one of the major battles of the Civil War. It’s the perfect place to not only enjoy your July 4th, yet be surrounded by some American history as well.

Leesburg, Virginia

Another historic location to spend your Fourth of July is in Leesburg, Virginia. Downtown Leesburg has an old, historic charm to it with shops, restaurants, microbreweries and wine kitchens. Beginning at 10 a.m, there will be an Independence Day parade. Venture outside of the historic downtown and find some of Virginia’s finest breweries and wineries. At night, head to Ida Lee Recreation Center for a concert and some of the best fireworks in Virginia.

Herndon, Virginia

There’s nothing like the Fourth of July, and another historic Virginia town has one of the best events for the holiday. Herndon, Virginia located in Fairfax County, is hosting their annual July 4th event featuring games, live music and other family-friendly activities before their fireworks show in the evening.

Lake Anna, Virginia

Spend your Fourth of July at the Lake this year at one of the most popular destinations in Virginia, Lake Anna. Located only 72 miles south of Washington D.C., Lake Anna has a bunch of activities for everyone including watersports and hiking. Although fireworks aren’t scheduled on the 4th, stay through the weekend to watch the free fireworks show on Saturday, July 6.

Charlottesville, Virginia

Another patriotic destination to spend the Fourth of July is in Charlottesville, Virginia. Charlottesville has a plethora of things to do for the 4th including, parades, fireworks and other celebrations across the city.

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NBA Draft prospect De'Andre Hunter is ready to make his family proud at the next level

NBA Draft prospect De'Andre Hunter is ready to make his family proud at the next level

When asked if his family had a motto, De'Andre Hunter summed it up in two words: "Family first."

"We have a great bond, we're really close and we all get along. I feel like that really helped me in the long run," the 2019 NBA Draft prospect told NBC Sports Washington for its miniseries I Am The Prospect. "We know we have each other's back, we always put each other before anyone else."

The Hunter family has always had De'Andre's back, supporting him from the days during his childhood when he'd wake them up early in the morning to play basketball, to the night he helped Virginia win its first NCAA title.

Things weren't always easy in the Hunter household. De'Andre's father, Aaron Hunter Sr., died when De'Andre was 7, forcing the entire family, especially his mother Priscilla, to take on more responsibility and bond together. 

"My mom is the rock of the family. She does anything for every single one of us. No matter where she is or what she's doing, she's willing to help us in any kind of way," Hunter said. "And as far as my brother and sisters, they're the same way. They're really caring, and we ... really look after each other. 

"In a family that's what you need, and we just always support each other, no matter what the circumstance is."

And as he grew up, De'Andre's older brother Aaron Jr. took on a more paternal role. 

"Once my father passed away, he really stepped up," De'Andre said of Aaron. "He really taught me a lot of things that he went through. I didn't see him grow up, but I saw him become, I feel like, a man in some sense. Because he had to take care of our family in a certain way.

"He cares for me a lot, so I thank him a lot for everything he's taught me."

In fact, it was Aaron who De'Andre called upon when he got the disappointing news he would be redshirted his first year at UVA and thus ineligible to play that season.  

"The decision to redshirt really hurt," Hunter said. "I didn't see it coming, but when coach (Tony Bennett) told me, I just took it."

"I told my brother, I probably complained to him a little bit but he just told me to use it in a beneficial way and don’t look at it in a negative way. I tried to do that, and I feel like in the long run it definitely helped me.

Over those next two seasons in Charlottesville, Hunter became a bonafide college star. He won the ACC's Sixth Man of the Year award during the 2017-18 season then earned the conference's Defensive Player of the Year award in 2018-19, not to mention leading the Cavaliers to a national championship, scoring a team-high 27 points in the title game against Texas Tech.

Hunter recalled how special it was having his family in the arena that night to celebrate with him. 

"It meant a lot for them to come all the way out to Minnesota to watch me play," he said. "They took off from work, took off from things they probably had to do, just to come see me play. That means a lot to me because they really don't have to do that. But they were there for me." 

Now, Hunter is preparing to take the next step into the NBA ranks. And when his name's called Thursday night at the draft, his family will be there cheering -- and probably crying -- for him. 

"Draft night's gonna be really emotional. I don't know if I'm gonna cry or not, but I know a few members of my family will be crying, so that'll probably get to me a little bit," Hunter said with a smile. "It's gonna be a great moment for not only me but for my family as well."

"My mom's for sure gonna cry. My sisters might even cry, but I feel like Aaron might let a few tears out."