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Judgment day for Bonds, Clemens, Sosa at Hall

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Judgment day for Bonds, Clemens, Sosa at Hall

NEW YORK (AP) There's a chance the podium under the chandeliers in the gold-and-ivory-colored Vanderbilt Room of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel will go unused.

With the cloud of steroids shrouding the candidacies of Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and others, baseball writers may fail for the only the second time in more than four decades to elect anyone to the Hall of Fame, rendering a news conference unnecessary.

About 600 people are eligible to vote in the BBWAA election, all members of the organization for 10 consecutive years at any point. Results will be announced at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday, with the focus on first-time eligibles that include Bonds, baseball's only seven-time Most Valuable Player, and Clemens, the only seven-time Cy Young Award winner.

Since 1965, the only years the writers didn't elect a candidate were when Yogi Berra topped the 1971 ballot at 67 percent and when Phil Niekro headed the 1996 ballot at 68 percent. Both were chosen the following years.

``It really would be a shame, especially since the other people going in this year are not among the living, which will make for a rather strange ceremony,'' said the San Francisco Chronicle's Susan Slusser, president of the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

Three inductees were chosen last month by the 16-member panel considering individuals from the era before integration in 1946: Yankees owner Jacob Ruppert, umpire Hank O'Day and barehanded catcher Deacon White. They will be enshrined during a ceremony at Cooperstown on July 28.

Also on the ballot for the first time are Sammy Sosa and Mike Piazza, power hitters whose statistics have been questioned because of the Steroids Era, and Craig Biggio, 20th on the career list with 3,060 hits - all for the Houston Astros. Curt Schilling, 11-2 with a 2.23 ERA in postseason play, is another ballot rookie.

The Hall is prepared to hold a news conference Thursday with any electees. Or to not have one.

Biggio wasn't sure whether the controversy over this year's ballot would keep all candidates out.

``All I know is that for this organization I did everything they ever asked me to do and I'm proud about it, so hopefully, the writers feel strongly, they liked what they saw, and we'll see what happens,'' Biggio said on Nov. 28, the day the ballot was announced.

Jane Forbes Clark, the Hall's chairman, said last year she was not troubled by voters weighing how to evaluate players in the era of performance-enhancing drugs.

``I think the museum is very comfortable with the decisions that the baseball writers make,'' she said. ``And so it's not a bad debate by any means.''

Bonds has denied knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs and was convicted of one count of obstruction of justice for giving an evasive answer in 2003 to a grand jury investigating PEDs. Clemens was acquitted of perjury charges stemming from congressional testimony during which he denied using PEDs.

Sosa, who finished with 609 home runs, was among those who tested positive in MLB's 2003 anonymous survey, The New York Times reported in 2009. He told a congressional committee in 2005 that he never took illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

The BBWAA election rules say ``voting shall be based upon the player's record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.''

``Steroid or HGH use is cheating, plain and simple,'' ESPN.com's Wallace Matthews wrote. ``And by definition, cheaters lack integrity, sportsmanship and character. Strike one, strike two, strike three.''

Several holdovers from last year remain on the 37-player ballot, with top candidates including Jack Morris (67 percent), Jeff Bagwell (56 percent), Lee Smith (51 percent) and Tim Raines (49 percent).

When The Associated Press surveyed 112 eligible voters in late November, Bonds received 45 percent support among voters who expressed an opinion, Clemens 43 percent and Sosa 18 percent. The Baseball Think Factory website compiled votes by writers who made their opinions public and with 151 ballots had everyone falling short. Biggio was at 68 percent, followed by Morris (63), Bagwell (62), Raines (61), Piazza (59), Bonds (43) and Clemens (42).

Morris finished second last year when Barry Larkin was elected and is in his 14th and next-to-last year of eligibility. He could become the player with the highest-percentage of the vote who is not in the Hall, a mark currently held by Gil Hodges at 63 percent in 1983.

Several players who fell just short in the BBWAA balloting later were elected by either the Veterans Committee or Old-Timers' Committee: Nellie Fox (74.7 percent on the 1985 BBWAA ballot), Jim Bunning (74.2 percent in 1988), Orlando Cepeda (73.6 percent in 1994) and Frank Chance (72.5 percent in 1945).

Ace of three World Series winners, Morris finished with 254 victories and was the winningest pitcher of the 1980s. His 3.90 ERA, however, is higher than that of any Hall of Famer. Morris will be joined on next year's ballot by Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine, both 300-game winners.

If no one is elected this year, there could be a logjam in 2014. Voters may select up to 10 players.

The only certainty is the Hall is pleased with the writers' process.

``While the BBWAA does the actual voting, it only does so at the request of the Hall of Fame,'' said the Los Angeles Times' Bill Shaikin, the organization's past president. ``If the Hall of Fame is troubled, certainly the Hall could make alternate arrangements.''

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Stefon Diggs is unsure about the NFL starting up with 'so many unanswered questions'

Stefon Diggs is unsure about the NFL starting up with 'so many unanswered questions'

On Tuesday, Cleveland Browns center and NFLPA president J.C. Tretter penned a letter questioning if the NFL is truly prioritizing player safety in its return to work plan, which is expected to begin with training camp at the end of the month.

Hours later, Buffalo Bills wide receiver and former Maryland Terrapin standout Stefon Diggs voiced similar concerns on Twitter, stating "I’d be lying if I said I was comfortable starting back up."

Earlier in the day, he tweeted that he missed football and that he loves the sport.

If and when the NFL does resume this fall, games will be played without fans in some stadiums. Diggs mentioned that it would be "weird" to play in front of an empty stadium, something he's never done before at any level of football.

Even if there are fans at NFL games this fall, they will be away from the playing field. The league has already announced that the first 6-8 rows of each lower bowl section will be blocked off from fans to help slow the spread of the coronavirus. Instead, those sections will be covered with advertisements, similarly to how the Premier League has done during its restart.

Training camp is set to being on July 28, around the same time both the MLB and NBA will begin/resume their respective seasons. With live-action just a few weeks away, we've seen multiple players across both sports opt-out from playing, including Nationals infielder Ryan Zimmerman and Wizards sharpshooter Davis Bertans.

As the NFL season begins to get closer, it's likely only a matter of time before a few players opt-out, too.

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Wizards Moe Wagner to wear 'Vote' on jersey as social justice statement, per report

Wizards Moe Wagner to wear 'Vote' on jersey as social justice statement, per report

When the NBA returns to action in Orlando later this month, some players will have the option to replace their last name on their jerseys with social justice statements. 

Washington Wizards' Moe Wagner will be one of those players that will be opting to do so, according to the TNT's Chris Haynes. Wagner will have 'Vote' on the back of his jersey.

The second-year player will join several other stars that will be speaking out by virtue of their jerseys. As of now, he joins Rudy Gobert, C.J. McCollum, Pat Connaughton and others who will have a social justice message on their threads. 

Rudy Gobert (Utah Jazz) - "Equality"
CJ McCollum (Portland Trail Blazers) - "Education Reform"
Jusuf Nurkic (Portland Trail Blazers) - 'Equality"
Kent Bazemore (Sacramento Kings) - "Education Reform"
Matisse Thybulle (Philadelphia 76ers) - "Vote"
Pat Connaughton (Milwaukee Bucks) - "Equality"
Meyers Leonard (Miami Heat) - "Equality"
Ivica Zubac (Los Angeles Clippers) - "Enough"
Moe Wagner (Wizards) - "Vote

More players will likely join-in to wear these statements. The NBA and NBPA agreed to this option allowing the players to inspire change on a large platform while restarting the 2020 season. The players can continue important conversations regarding race and social injustice as opposed to basketball serving as a distraction to larger issues within the country.

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Some players are "disgruntled with the lack of options" the NBA provided, according to Haynes. There are 28 options for players to chose from, along with their regular last name. According to ESPN, here are the phrase options:

-Black Lives Matter
-Say Their Names
-Vote
-I Can't Breathe
-Justice
-Peace
-Equality
-Freedom
-Enough
-Power to the People
-Justice Now
-Say Her Name
-Sí Se Puede (Yes We Can)
-Liberation
-See Us
-Hear Us
-Respect Us
-Love Us
-Listen
-Listen to Us
-Stand Up
-Ally
-Anti-Racist
-I Am A Man
-Speak Up
-How Many More
-Group Economics
-Education Reform
-Mentor

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