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K-State's Snyder signs 5-year, $14.75 million deal

K-State's Snyder signs 5-year, $14.75 million deal

MANHATTAN, Kan. (AP) Bill Snyder turned 73 in October, so it was only natural that folks across college football would start wondering just how long the maestro of Manhattan would remain on the sidelines.

Kansas State delivered its answer Thursday: As long as he wants.

Snyder signed a new five-year contract that includes an increase in base compensation to $14.75 million over the life of the contract. The deal replaces one signed in 2009 that did not specify his compensation past the fifth year, and like that contract, it will roll over annually.

``As I have stated so often we came to Kansas State because of the people, stayed because of the people and returned because of the people, and that remains unchanged,'' Snyder said in a statement.

Snyder, who was voted AP's Big 12 coach of the year after going 11-2 this season, will make $2.75 million for the 2013 season, with annual increases of $100,000 through the 2017 season. The contract also includes several bonus and benefit provisions.

``We have continued to make daily improvement as a football program,'' Snyder said, ``and I am grateful for the opportunity to continue and will do so as long as I feel I am having a positive impact on our university, community and football program and the young men that are involved.''

Athletic director John Currie told The Associated Press that he wanted to reward Snyder after winning the school's second Big 12 title this past season, but he also acknowledged that rumors and questions that always seem to circle around the most successful coach in school history.

Some recruits have begun to question whether Snyder would be around for their entire career, and two assistants have departed the staff this offseason - one for Arkansas, another for Big 12 rival Oklahoma State - and generated more questions about the program's long-term stability.

``This is really recognition of his leadership,'' Currie said in a phone interview, ``and it also sends a signal: How long he's going to coach, whenever he's going to retire, all that stuff, however long it is we're happy to have him here.''

Even when Snyder's coaching career is finished, he'll still have a place at Kansas State. His contract calls for him to become a special assistant to the AD at an annual salary of $250,000.

``The nature of his re-engagement four years ago led to some of those questions,'' Currie said. ``I never had those questions (about how long he'll coach). My interaction with him is always inspiring, because he's always so diligent, working hard and thinking only about those matters at hand.''

Snyder arrived at Kansas State in 1989 and quickly set about turning around one of the worst programs in major college football, one that had gone winless in 27 consecutive games.

Within three years, the Wildcats were a winning team. Within five, they were headed to their second ever bowl game. Within seven, they were producing double-digit victory totals.

The Wildcats finally won the Big 12 title in 2003, but they quickly slipped into a period of mediocrity, and Snyder abruptly retired after two more seasons. But he always remained close to the program, and when it slipped further under Ron Prince, he returned to the sidelines.

He went 6-6 his first year back, took his team to the Pinstripe Bowl in Year 2, and then went 10-3 and landed in the Cotton Bowl to set the stage for this season.

Led by Heisman Trophy finalist Collin Klein, the Wildcats made a mockery of preseason polls that had them sixth in the conference. They won their first 10 games and reached No. 1 in the BCS standings before a loss to Baylor dashed their national title hopes.

Kansas State rebounded to beat Texas and win the Big 12 title, and then lost to Oregon in the Fiesta Bowl to finish with 11 wins for the seventh time in Snyder's 21 seasons.

Snyder's career record of 170-85-1, all with the Wildcats, places him seventh among active head coaches in the Football Bowl Subdivision in victories.

``Bill Snyder is one of college football's most respected legends,'' Kansas State president Kirk Schulz said. ``We are so fortunate to have one of the very best coaches in college football history who also fully embraces and understands the value and mission of our university.''

Kansas State will continue to reward him for future success.

Snyder's contract includes a bonus of $50,000 for a third-place finish in the Big 12, $75,000 for a second-place finish or $100,000 for winning the conference title. He will also receive $50,000 for each bowl appearance, or $100,000 if it's a ``BCS bowl.'' That total increases to $175,000 for making the national semifinals when college football's playoff structure begins in 2014, $250,000 for playing in the championship game or $350,000 for winning the national title.

Snyder is also eligible for a $30,000 bonus for winning one of three coach of the year awards, $50,000 for a top-20 finish in the AP or BCS standings, or $100,000 for finishing in the top 10.

Beyond the compensation and bonuses, Snyder's contract includes similar benefits to his previous deal: group insurance and retirement plans; the use of a courtesy vehicle and a vehicle stipend; the use of a suite in the stadium, which is undergoing $75 million in renovations; membership at a country club; men's and women's basketball tickets, including Big 12 and NCAA tournament tickets; 10 hours of private plane use annually; $50,000 for business-related expenses; other travel benefits, and the use of the school's recreation complex and associated facilities.

``Coach Snyder's daily drive, focus and energy in continuing to build the K-State football program are truly remarkable and inspirational,'' Currie said. ``While he is not one to focus attention on himself, President Schulz and I felt that it was important to recognize in this very significant way his tremendous leadership and commitment to continuing to lead the K-State football program.''

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Baltimore Ravens Roundup: What to look out for at OTAs

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Baltimore Ravens Roundup: What to look out for at OTAs

Kick off your Thursday with the latest Baltimore Ravens news including what to watch for at OTAs.

Player/Team Notes: 

1. As the Ravens try and bolster their pass rush during the offseason, they hope to find much-needed help from outside linebacker, Shane Ray. The Ravens picked up Ray from the Denver Broncos where he had an unproductive last two seasons due to injury, only registering one sack in each of the past two seasons. However, Ray had a phenomenal career at Missouri as a unanimous All-American and SEC Defensive Player of the Year in 2014. The Ravens have given Ray a shot at a career reboot and fans are excited to see what he's got.

2. Thursday is the media's first opportunity to get a look at the 2019-20 Ravens. Ravens writer Ryan Mink writes seven things to look out for at OTAs including, attendance from veterans even though OTAs are mandatory, a look at linebacker development with the signings of namely Pernell McPhee and Shane Ray and a first look at the rookie class to name a few.

Looking Ahead:

July 15: 4 p.m. deadline to get a long-term deal done with designated franchise tag players.

The 2019 NFL schedule is set! See the Baltimore Ravens defend the AFC North at M&T Bank Stadium this season. Get your tickets now at www.BaltimoreRavens.com/tickets.

Credit: Baltimore Ravens for news points.

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Bradley Beal's potential All-NBA scenario leads league sources toward trade route

Bradley Beal's potential All-NBA scenario leads league sources toward trade route

With an All-NBA nod, Bradley Beal and the Wizards would almost immediately find themselves at a crossroads.

The honor would make him eligible for the supermax contract, which could force the Wizards to move the two-time All-Star. The Wizards already handed one of those supermax deals to John Wall. If Beal signed a four-year, $193 million extension, the two guards would gobble up more than two-thirds of the team's salary cap space starting in 2021-22.

Everyone knows of Washington's immediate concern. Wall faces a year-long recovery after suffering a ruptured left Achilles heel in February. Even with a prompt return, the Wizards cannot realistically plan on having the five-time All-Star next season.

Based on the injury and Wall turning 30, Wall's level of effectiveness in 2020-21 remains unclear. Ideally, he looks the part for at least the final two years of the contract.

Hold out for Wall's healthy return and the clock may run out on the two years remaining on Beal's current contract with no guarantee the shooting guard re-signs. Therefore, with the Wizards retooling after a 32-50 season and regardless of the All-NBA result, the answer is clear according to numerous league sources: Trade Bradley Beal for assets and salary cap space.

So where would he go?

That might depend.

Can New Orleans convince the disgruntled big man to reverse course on his trade demands? We'll see if that happens, but the Pelicans' current A, B and C plan involves rolling out Davis, projected No. 1 overall pick Zion Williamson and Jrue Holiday next season, according to sources.

How this drama plays out affects the entire NBA off-season. Every team would welcome Davis, but only a few have the realistic assets to acquire one the league's top players. Some franchises stockpiled draft picks and players on rookie contracts for this moment. If the Pelicans keep Davis, a 2020 free agent, those teams must turn elsewhere.

No, that doesn't mean Bradley Beal automatically.

"As good as Bradley Beal is, he isn't Anthony Davis," one GM told NBC Sports Washington. "Beal isn't an alternative to Davis, but to free agency."

Beal has $56 million coming his way over the final two years of his current contract. Signing any of the 2019 free agent headliners would cost much more in terms of dollars and salary cap space.

76ers guard Jimmy Butler, a relative peer of Beal albeit four years older, is in line for a max contract of 5-year, $190 million with Philadelphia or 4-year, $141 with another team.

If there's a trade involving Beal this off-season, logic suggests, from the Wizards perspective, it occurs before or during the June 20 NBA Draft.

Beal's trade value on the current contract will likely never be higher. Since 2019 draft picks would probably be part of any deal, and the new general manager will want to make those selections.

A look at the landscape:

Lakers -- All the Davis trade buzz last season focused on Los Angeles since his camp made it clear that's where he wanted to land. The potential also worked since the Lakers asset class held great appeal. That is until the group largely plateaued during a dysfunctional season, the first Lonzo Ball, Brandon Ingram, Kyle Kuzma or Josh Hart played with LeBron James.

One general manager suggested not to diminish the upside on those players, contending the Lakers still have the best trade assets. "That's what they look like in that environment -- and playing with that guy," the GM told NBC Sports Washington.

If there's a deal with the Lakers, most sources would want Ball involved regardless of any parent distractions from his attention-seeking father, Lavar. "People just don't grasp how good he is," a source said.

Los Angeles owns the fourth pick in the 2019 Draft. One source views Ingram, Kuzma and four for Beal as fair value assuming Ingram, the No. 2 overall pick in 2016, is cleared medically following a blood clot scare that ended his season prematurely.

Knicks -- New York likely would want to wait for Kevin Durant to sign in free agency as the long-running rumors suggest. Then the question is who gets the second max slot.

Kyrie Irving? Certainly possible. We know the Celtics are out. One source said don't sleep on the Nets getting involved.

Kemba Walker is a New York native. The All-NBA candidate is also someone the Hornets might do whatever it costs to keep.

There's also Beal, who would make a great fit next to a fellow perimeter threat in Durant.

The Knicks' assets include the third pick in 2019, which is a projected tier above the fourth slot since it means landing no less than Duke guard RJ Barrett. New York also has impressive rookie center Mitchell Robinson, point guard Dennis Smith and an unprotected first-round pick from Dallas that projects to convey in 2021.

If the Knicks decline to part with Robinson and three, the Wizards would have to consider Barrett, the top recruit in the 2018 class and Duke's leading scorer, a future All-Star. They might.

Celtics -- The bond between Beal and Jayson Tatum began growing up in St. Louis. They could be connected again if Washington and Boston talk trade.

The Celtics own three first-round selections -- 14, 20, 22 -- in next month's draft along with two former top 5 picks on rookie deals: Tatum and Jaylon Brown.

"Tatum's stock took a hit this season," an Eastern Conference scout said. Others made similar claims during the season as the playmaking forward appeared lost at times playing with Irving. Regardless, Tatum is a talented 21-year-old who went head-to-head against LeBron James in the 2018 Eastern Conference Final.

"Tatum and 22 for Beal? Brown and 20? That's something to consider," the scout said.

The Wizards have plenty to consider over the next few weeks including whether to trade Bradley Beal.

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