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Two quarterbacks, but both would present problems for Terps

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Two quarterbacks, but both would present problems for Terps

COLLEGE PARK -- If this were the NFL, Maryland would gladly put together a package to try to trade for either Cardale Jones or J.T. Barrett -- simultaneously clearing up the Buckeyes' quarterback questions while remedying their own struggles. 

But nothing can be done now, as Maryland prepares to face the prospect of one, the other, or both on Saturday when the Terrapins travel to Columbus to face No. 1 Ohio State.

Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer has used Jones and Barrett in varying capacities this season, with Jones typically the starter. But Barrett has seen a featured role at times, too, including in the Buckeyes' narrow 20-13 win over Northern Illinois. 

When asked whether he foresaw a quarterback change at Ohio State, Edsall answered dryly with a smirk.

"I don't know," he said. "Urban didn't call me to tell me if they might do that."

He then elaborated.

MORE TERPS: EDSALL DEFLECTS QUESTION ABOUT JOB SECURITY IN LEAD-UP TO GAME VS. OHIO STATE

"I think their offense is pretty much similar to what they do with both guys if they're in there. They don't change that much. Again, they do enough of the things that they do that our guys, regardless of who's in there, just has to go out there and execute what we say and what we call and if we do that, we'll be fine."

Maryland's pass rush was strong to begin the season, ranking second in the country in sacks through three weeks. But the defense was burned by West Virginia and Michigan over the past two games, amounting to a combined margin of defeat of 73-6.

As Edsall pointed out, the offense is a threat regardless of who is under center. That's to be expected when one player nearly won the Big Ten Player of the Year last season before an injury and the other picked up where he left off to lead the team to a national title.

"We're definitely planning for both quarterbacks. To me, they kind of got similar styles a little bit," defensive lineman Quinton Jefferson said. "J.T. maybe he'll run more than Cardale, but they're both good guys. We're ready for whoever they put in there."

Kickoff is set for noon in Columbus.

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Tony Dungy weighs in on the alleged toxic culture within the University of Maryland football team

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USA TODAY Sports

Tony Dungy weighs in on the alleged toxic culture within the University of Maryland football team

Tony Dungy is about as cool, calm and collected as a person can get. And when it comes to his coaching style, it's exactly the same.

Fourteen years in the NFL spent as a defensive coordinator/coach and 13 years as a head coach earned Dungy a Super Bowl Championship with the Indianapolis Colts. He posted an overall record of 148-79 with the foundation that cursing and raising your voice wasn't necessary for success. 

The culture and coaching style of the University of Maryland football team is now under a microscope with the on-going investigation regarding the death of 19-year-old offensive lineman Jordan McNair. The university has taken responsibility for McNair's death after an ESPN article brought to light the abuse and "toxic culture" within the team, and what ultimately led up to McNair's passing under their supervision on May 29. 

It has also brought into question how high-level football teams are coached and if it's all just a part of the football culture. On Thursday, Dungy weighed in on the matter on 106.7 The Fan's Sports Junkies, simulcasted on NBC Sports Washington.

"Well first, I hope we don't just read into well, here was the culture, here's what the coach was doing so that's why this young man died," Dungy said.

Dungy recounted a scenario during his coaching career with the Colts where a player had an underlying condition that almost caused him to lose his life during a practice.

"You can't equate well, this happened because," Dungy went on to say. 

What Dungy does want people to understand is that the tough love, scream-in-your-face type of coaching style is not the stereotype coaches must adhere to. 

"But I do think we are a victim of caricatures. That we think that's the way it has to be."

"One of the last interviews I had before I got my head [coaching] job in Tampa, I was explaining to this owner how I was going to do things. He had heard about my reputation. He said 'I know you don't use profanity. You rarely raise your voice. How are you going to motivate these guys? How are you going to discipline? How are you going to keep guys in line?' And I said the same way my father kept me in line. By saying here's the rules and here's what we're going to do. I'm going to be like that with my players. And the guy looked at me square in the eyes and said 'impossible, that will never work in the NFL.'" 

Well, it did work for Dungy as his tenure spent as a coach in the NFL earned him enshrinement in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2016. 

Dungy noted in his interview with the Sports Junkies that the different personalities of coaches in the league highlighted in shows like HBO's Hard Knocks do not represent each and every coach. He mentions Jim Caldwell and Bill Belichick as successful coaches who are more mild-mannered like Dungy.

"And there's a thousand ways that work," Dungy said about coaching. "And you got to be true to your personality and everything. But the two coaches that I played for in the NFL – who won seven Super Bowls between them and were tremendous coaches, Hall of Famers – there was none of that. There was instruction, teaching, motivating, building you up and getting you ready to play, and so that's what I followed." 

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Maryland's strength and conditioning coach Rick Court resigns after the death of Jordan McNair

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Maryland's strength and conditioning coach Rick Court resigns after the death of Jordan McNair

On Tuesday during a press conference, the University of Maryland announced the removal of head strength and conditioning coach Rick Court.

This announcement comes in the wake of disturbing details leading up to, and including, the death of football player Jordan McNair.

It was also revealed that head football coach D.J. Durkin remains on administrative leave according to athletic director Damon Evans.  

Prior to this announcement, Court resigned and reached a settlement with the university.

During the press conference, university president Wallace Loh also stated that the university would take responsibility for McNair's death.

"The university accepts legal and moral responsibility for the mistakes that our training staff made on that fateful workout day of May 29, which of course led subsequently to his death," Loh said.

"Some of the actions of our athletic training staff, not the coaching staff, the athletic training staff, they basically misdiagnosed the situation. No vital signs were taken, other safeguard actions that should have been taken were not.”

McNair's died as the result of a heat stroke that occurred during the aforementioned workout. Collapsing on the field due to exhaustion, the 19-year-old suffered a seizure and the authorities were not contacted for nearly an hour. McNair would pass two weeks later.

Not much information on the internal investigation was released by the school up until the latest report from ESPN this past Friday. In this report, ESPN detailed a “toxic culture” that ultimately led to the death of the young football player. Court was at the center of these remarks and was given a lot of the blame for what happened.

After the allegations on Friday, Maryland put Durkin on leave due to "allegations of inappropriate behavior" along with other staffers that included Court. 

Matt Canada is currently the interim head coach of the Terps in his first season with the team. Canada was named Durkin's offensive coordinator this season after being fired from the same position at LSU. 

Maryland kicks off their football season in less than three weeks, hosting Texas on September 1. 

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