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McCoy, Del Rio may benefit from Broncos' success

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McCoy, Del Rio may benefit from Broncos' success

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) The more the Denver Broncos win, the better the chance they lose - coordinators, that is.

Defensive boss Jack Del Rio and his offensive counterpart, Mike McCoy, figure to be hot commodities for any head coaching vacancies when the season finally winds down. That's simply the price of success.

``You like to see people get opportunities and have those options,'' said coach John Fox, whose Broncos (11-3) will host Cleveland (5-9) on Sunday. ``I'm sure it will be no different this year.''

Losing a defensive coordinator has almost become a rite of passage for cornerback Champ Bailey. One year with the Pro Bowler and they're out the door.

That's been the case the last six seasons and there's a possibility it could happen again after this year, especially with the way Del Rio has the defense humming along.

Surely, orchestrating one of the top defenses in the league will garner Del Rio some consideration for another head coaching job.

Bailey understands, though. He would never stand in the way of an upgrade, even if it meant learning another new system from yet another coordinator.

``It (stinks) not to have a guy coming back that you've done good things with, but any time a guy gets a promotion, you've got to applaud that,'' Bailey said. ``I'd be happy for him. It would (stink) for us, because we'd have to start all over again, but it is what it is.

``Everybody wants a promotion.''

McCoy nearly had one a year ago, receiving not only kudos for the job he did with overhauling the offense to fit Tim Tebow's unorthodox style, but strong consideration as a head coach. He was in the running for the Miami Dolphins job before it went to Joe Philbin.

This season, he's assisted in resurrecting the career of Peyton Manning, who's thrown for the fourth-most yards passing (4,016) in a season for the Broncos and has an outside chance to break Jay Cutler's franchise mark (4,526) set in 2008.

Not bad considering Manning was coming off neck surgery and few figured he would have this bountiful of season.

So dominant has the offense been during the Broncos' nine-game win streak that they're beating teams by an average of 12.7 points.

Even more, they've also averaged 29 points a game this season, an output that could draw teams in need of a head coach toward McCoy.

Although, he quickly deflected the attention.

``Good players make good coaches,'' McCoy said. ``My wife and I and the kids, we absolutely love Denver. We'll see what happens. If it's meant to be, it's meant to be. If not, hey, we can stay here for a long time.

``We have a lot of football left this year to go. We'll see what happens down the road.''

McCoy has certainly earned the respect of Manning, who also credits quarterbacks coach Adam Gase with his stellar performance this season.

``I'm grateful for their help and support,'' Manning said.

A defensive coordinator moving on after a season in this city has almost become expected. After last season, Dennis Allen bolted to take over in Oakland.

Other coordinators who have filled the spot over the last few years include Larry Coyer (2006), Jim Bates (2007), Bob Slowik (2008), Mike Nolan (2009) and Don Martindale (2010).

That has Bailey wondering - kiddingly, of course - if he's doing something to drive them off?

``I know I'm up there,'' Bailey said of where he would rank among players who've had the most coordinators through a career. ``I've got to be up there. I don't know how many I've had - 12, 13, whatever. It's nothing new to me.''

Del Rio has a rather good thing going in Denver with two of the elite pass rushers in the game in Von Miller and Elvis Dumervil, a talented linebacker collection and a secondary led by Bailey. That's a pretty formidable ensemble in which to build a dominating defense.

He's really in no rush to go anywhere just yet.

``When you're a young guy and you haven't been there, the urgency and desire to get that opportunity is such that you'd take just about any job given to you,'' said Del Rio, who was in charge in Jacksonville for nine seasons. ``I don't feel that way now. If there's something that fits and the right situation comes along, so be it. But in the meantime, I'm all in, 100 percent as a lieutenant on this staff. I'm somebody that John Fox, John Elway ... and the players can count on. I'm 100 percent invested in helping them be their best.''

Any chance Baily would consider being a player-coach, should Del Rio ever move on?

That way, Bailey could assure a level of continuity for years to come.

``Ahh, no,'' Bailey said, smiling.

NOTES: Broncos OL Chris Kuper missed practice Friday with a balky left ankle and migraine symptoms. He's doubtful for the game against the Browns. ... FB Chris Gronkowski (hamstring) was limited at practice. There are nine other players on the injury report listed as probable. ``Right now, we're relatively healthy considering we're second-to-the-last regular season game and that's all good,'' Fox said.

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AP National Writer Eddie Pells contributed to this report.

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Stanley Cup Final 2018: X-factors that could swing the series

Stanley Cup Final 2018: X-factors that could swing the series

The Washington Capitals and Vegas Golden Knights have met only twice in their history. Neither team was expected to get to this point so you can go ahead and throw away the stats, the matchups, the data and the history. A new story will be written in the Stanley Cup FInal.

Who will ultimately win the Cup? Here are four factors that could ultaimtely swing the series.

1. Goaltending

The Caps have faced elimination only twice in the playoffs and Braden Holtby did not allow a single goal in either game. He enters the Stanley Cup Final having not allowed a single goal in 159:27. Andrei Vasilevskiy began to take over the series with his performance in Game 3, Game 4 and Game 5, but Holtby outplayed him to finish off the series in Washington’s favor.

Marc-Andre Fleury, meanwhile, has been the best player in the playoffs. Not the best goalie, the best player.

Through 15 games, Fleury has a .947 save percentage and four shutouts. As good as Vegas has been this postseason, Fleury has stolen several games for the Golden Knights.

Both of these goalies are certainly capable of stealing away a series for their respective teams. Which one will outplay the other?

2. Time off

Rust is a real thing in hockey. Just any team when they come off a bye week. When the Caps and Golden Knights take the ice on Monday, May 28, it will be the first game for Vegas since May 20. That’s over a week off.

Yes, getting rest at this time of the year is important, but too much rest leads to rust and that should be a major concern for Vegas, especially for a team that was playing so well and has so much momentum.

In the Eastern Conference Final, the Caps stunned the Tampa Bay Lightning by winning both Game 1 and Game 2 in Tampa. Could they do it again with a rusty Vegas team? Will the long layoff cost the Golden Knights one or even two home games to start the series?

3. The McPhee factor

Vegas Golden Knights general manager George McPhee was the Caps’ general manager for 17 years starting with the 1997-98 season. He was fired in 2014, but was ultimately responsible for building the core of the Washington team that is now headed to the Stanley Cup Final.

But that also means he knows those players very, very well.

Nicklas Backstrom, Travis Boyd, Andre Burakovsky, John Carlson, Christian Djoos, Evgeny Kuznetsov, Dmitry Orlov, Chandler Stephenson, Jakub Vrana, Tom Wilson, Braden Holtby, Philipp Grubauer and of course, Alex Ovechkin were all drafted by McPhee. Jay Beagle was also signed by as an undrafted free agent.

A general manager does not sign or draft anyone without knowing a good deal about the kind of player they are. Does that give McPhee a bit of an edge when it comes to facing the Caps?

4. Speed

The Golden Knights are fast. When the expansion draft was all said and done it was clear McPhee had targeted two things specifically: defensemen and speed. The result is an exceptionally fast Golden Knights team that no one has been able to keep up with so far.

Vegas' speed mixed with the goaltending of Fleury has proven to be a lethal combination. Their mobility makes it hard to get the puck from them or even keep it in the offensive zone. Once they get it, it’s going down the ice very quickly and you better keep up with them or it's going to end up in the back of the net. Once they build a lead, it is very difficult for teams to dig their way out as evidenced by their 10-1 record this postseason when scoring first.

Tampa Bay and Pittsburgh were both fast teams as well and the Capitals were able to combat that with strong play in the neutral zone. The 1-3-1 trap has given opponents fits and generated a lot of odd-man breaks for the Caps. Will it be as effective against a speedy Vegas team?

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Trotz's future in Washington remains unsettled on eve Stanley Cup Final

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Trotz's future in Washington remains unsettled on eve Stanley Cup Final

Caps Coach Barry Trotz doesn’t have a contract beyond the Stanley Cup Final, and any potential talks about an extension will wait until the trophy is awarded, GM Brian MacLellan said Friday.

“No,” MacLellan said, asked if a decision on Trotz’s future had been made. “We’re going to address everything after the playoffs are over.”

Trotz’s four-year contract expires at season’s end.

It’s rare for a head coach to enter a season while in the final year of his deal. But that’s how the Caps decided to handle Trotz’s situation last offseason after another strong regular season performance ended with yet another second round playoff exit at the hands of the Penguins.

It was a suboptimal situation for Trotz, a 55-year-old who ranks fifth all-time in regular season victories but, until this year, had never led any team beyond the conference semifinals.

Despite his lame duck status, all Trotz did was produce his best coaching performance to date. 

Consider:

  • While visiting his son in Russia last summer, Trotz visited Alex Ovechkin in Moscow to discuss the changes he’d like to see the Caps’ captain make to his training and his game.
  • When the Caps reconvened for training camp in September, it was clear there were still some hurt feelings in the locker room. So Trotz and his assistants backed off, allowing some necessary healing to occur.
  • When the team suffered back-to-back blowout losses in Nashville and Colorado back in November, Trotz initiated a tell-it-like-it-is team meeting that many players have pointed to as the turning point of the regular season, which ended with the team’s third straight Metropolitan title.
  • Trotz also got his highly-skilled lineup to buy into a more structured, detailed style of play late in the campaign, a transformation that prompted MacLellan to call this playoff run the most defensively responsible of Trotz’s tenure.
  • In each of the two previous conference semifinals, Washington was defeated by Pittsburgh and, as a result, the Penguins had become a physical and a mental hurdle for the Caps. Earlier this month, Trotz helped direct Ovechkin and Co. past the two-time Cup champions.

Although MacLellan wouldn’t say much about Trotz’s contract, he did say that he’s noticed a big change in Trotz’s day-to-day approach to his job, a change possibly prompted by the coach’s free agent status.

“I think his demeanor has changed a little bit,” MacLellan said. “He seems a little lighter, a little looser, a little less pressure. Maybe a little more freedom about how he goes about things. He’s more relaxed, I guess would be the way to describe him.”

MacLellan also acknowledged the job Trotz’s has done this season, beginning with his delicate handling of the dressing room to start the year.

“I think he’s done a good job managing it,” MacLellan said. “To come in this year with so many questions—from my point of view, the lineup questions weren’t that big of a deal—but just the emotional state of our coming into to start the year [and] how to handle that. I think he’s done an outstanding job.”

Indeed, Trotz’s situation remains unclear on the eve of the Final. But we do know this much: He’s having one of the best contract years in NHL coaching history.

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