Redskins

Miami Heat sign Chris Andersen to 10-day contract

Miami Heat sign Chris Andersen to 10-day contract

MIAMI (AP) Chris Andersen wore a stars-and-stripes headband Sunday morning, showed off the colorful array of tattoos that stretch from his neck to his ankles and virtually all spots in between, and spoke about himself in the third person.

He's got 10 days to make an impression on the Miami Heat.

Seems like he's already off to a good start.

The veteran forward-center signed a 10-day deal with the Heat on Sunday and worked out with his new club for the first time. For a team that's looking for rebounding help, Andersen - who hasn't appeared in an NBA game since playing with Denver last March - is hoping that he will be the answer.

``This opportunity and being with the defending champs, it's a dream come true,'' Andersen said. ``They're taking a chance with me and I'm here to give them everything I've got, defensively, diving on the floor, blocking shots, you know, the usual that a Birdman does and what Birdman brings.''

Birdman is the nickname he's had for years.

The Heat are more than a little curious to find out if he can still fly.

``Typically, you're not able to get a player of his caliber at this time of year,'' Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. ``But three years ago he was the best in the game coming off the bench at his position, as a shot-blocker and a rebounder. We've always liked him. We had him in our camp a long time ago, when he was just coming up in this league, pre-tattoo, and we liked him back then. Ever since then we've searched for ways to get him back.''

The Heat worked Andersen - who has averaged 5.4 points and 5.2 rebounds in 482 NBA games - out earlier this month, around the time they were starting a six-game road swing. They didn't sign him immediately, but Andersen was doing two-a-day sessions in Miami while the Heat were gone and in essence scouting the way they played from studying their games closely during the trip.

If all goes well, Andersen is expected to make his Heat debut on Wednesday when Miami hosts Toronto.

``We love guys with chips who feel like they've got something to prove for a lot of teams not giving them an opportunity,'' Heat forward LeBron James said. ``Hopefully he plays with that type of intensity.''

Andersen's past - and in some respects, his present - is dotted by off-court issues.

He was barred from the NBA for just over two years because of substance-abuse issues, and had his home in Colorado searched last May as part of an investigation into what was described as Internet-related crimes against children. He was excused from team activities by Denver to deal with the investigation, and the Nuggets waived him through the amnesty clause in July.

``There has been an investigation and I have cooperated fully with the authorities in Denver,'' Andersen said. ``I am not the target of the investigation and no arrests have been made and no charges have been filed against me. I'm grateful for this opportunity that the Miami Heat has given me.''

Speaking before his team played Oklahoma City on Sunday night, Denver coach George Karl said he was ``very happy'' that Andersen is getting a chance with Miami.

``Bird knows we've given him very good endorsements,'' Karl said.

Spoelstra did not address Andersen's off-court questions specifically, though insisted that Miami has no qualms about bringing him into the mix.

``We've done enough research on him. We feel he fits in very well,'' Spoelstra said.

And yes, Heat president Pat Riley's preference for players to not wear headbands - a policy that has been relaxed a bit in recent years - will not apply to Andersen.

He asked for permission, and apparently got it in a mildly comical manner.

``I was told about the code of conduct around here,'' Andersen said. ``I went into Pat Riley's office and I asked him if it was cool if I could wear my headband, because I do a sweat a lot. And he was like, yeah, because he didn't want me perspiring on his nice floor.''

No, what Riley wants is for him to rebound on his nice floor.

Rebounding has been a major question for the Heat in recent weeks, even while the team has held on to the top spot in the Eastern Conference race. So the team made roughly 21 feet worth of moves on Sunday, signing both Andersen and Jarvis Varnado to 10-day deals - it's Varnado's second such contract with Miami - and recalling another big man, Dexter Pittman from the NBA Development League team in Sioux Falls.

Miami entered Sunday ranked 29th in the 30-team NBA in rebounds per game.

``I'm here to help assist in any kind of rebounding or defense that I can provide to an already outstanding team who are defending champions,'' Andersen said. ``And I'm just ecstatic to be here and I'm ready to get back to blockin' and rollin'.''

Andersen said he had his left knee scoped in August, but has been able to work out in Texas and Colorado while waiting for an NBA team to call. He didn't reveal how good the knee feels now, though pointed to his tattoos as evidence that he's got at least some level of pain tolerance.

``That ain't gonna keep the Birdman from flyin' and getting in there and getting some rebounds and bangin' and playin' hard,'' Andersen said. ``As you can see, I'm pretty much accustomed to pain. But it ain't gonna stop me from coming out here and assisting these champions and trying to help them win another championship.''

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A house for mom, dinner for his linemen and a custom Bentley: How Dwayne Haskins spent his first million

A house for mom, dinner for his linemen and a custom Bentley: How Dwayne Haskins spent his first million

Dwayne Haskins learned a lot in his first go-round in the NFL, including just how much work is required to be a successful starting QB and how intense a typical season with the Redskins can be.

He also was exposed to the dark reality of taxes for the first time, which are far scarier than even the most devastating opposing pass rush.

In a video for GQ Sports and their "My First Million" series, Haskins discussed how he, well, spent his first million dollars as a pro. It's an epic tale, one filled with wild stories and useful lessons — including the following relatable take.

"Taxes are no joke, bro," he said.

The biggest choice the first-rounder made for himself was to pick out a custom-made Bentley that cost him $250,000. He loves it and calls it "my baby" and the "Batmobile." He's also now out of the vehicle-purchasing game for a while because of it.

"I'm not buying no more cars," Haskins said. "Not a very great investment to buy cars."

Next up for the passer was to take care of his mom, so he paid for a house that totaled about $750,000. 

"Being able to just, 'Hey mom, I've got a surprise for you, here's a house,'" Haskins recalled. "Definitely made those 14-plus years of hard work worth it."

So, that's all, right? Those two items add up to a million, so we're done here? 

Well, the house isn't technically for Haskins, so therefore, it doesn't take up room on his ledger. So the story continued.

The 22-year-old committed about $70,000 to jewelry and has about $5,000 to $7,000 set aside for a vacation to the Bahamas he's got planned for next month. He also has an estimated $10,000 in murals at his place and spent about $40,000 on clothes, including some suits to wear on game day and to events.

Then, there was a rookie dinner, where he had to treat his offensive linemen to a meal. Those guys didn't go the salad route, either.

"Of course they ordered all the appetizers, all the steaks they can get," he said. "They do not want to go to Applebee's. They want to go to the best steak place they can find... I'll do it again if I have to."

For a guy who didn't have to pay for much in college aside from a car note and maybe some bills at the library, it was quite a transition into adulthood and moneyhood. He's taken steps to hire a financial adviser and put his earnings into "different buckets," though, and seems confident he'll be in good shape for a long time.

Plus, if he excels in the coming seasons, there'll be plenty more millions coming his way. And by then, he won't be surprised when a lot of that goes to taxes.

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Report: CBA proposal would change NFL playoff structure, add 7th spot in both conferences

Report: CBA proposal would change NFL playoff structure, add 7th spot in both conferences

Teams on the brink of the playoffs could receive a big boost in the upcoming NFL season. 

According to ESPN's Adam Schefter, the league's new collective bargaining agreement proposal would add an additional playoff spot in both conferences and eliminate a first-round bye for the second seed, ultimately creating a six-game slate for Wild Card weekend. 

There's growing confidence that the players and owners can strike an agreement, and that could come as early as next week, according to Schefter.

That optimism comes less than a month after NFL Players Association Executive Director DeMaurice Smith hinted that a two-year strike may be necessary for the players to receive everything they're seeking in the new deal. 

If the proposal gets passed through, the league would implement the playoff changes for the 2020-2021 season. 

Players that are on the top-seeded team in each conference would also receive pay during the first-round bye, which is not the case under the current agreement. 

There are still issues to resolve before the two sides reach an agreement, according to ESPN. Chief among those issues is the back-and-forth about allowing the possibility of a 17-game regular season, which the league would not phase in until at least 2021. 

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