Redskins

Mizzou still buzzing about Dixon departure

Mizzou still buzzing about Dixon departure

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) Michael Dixon's abrupt departure from the Missouri men's basketball team hasn't quieted the campus conversation about his exit.

The senior guard announced his intent to transfer on Nov. 29 after two sexual assault claims became public. Dixon had been benched all season by No. 12 Missouri (7-1) and coach Frank Haith for unspecified team rule violations. He was not charged in either case.

In an interview with The Associated Press, University of Missouri Board of Curators chairman David Bradley suggested the school may need to take a closer look at its student disciplinary process. Dixon reportedly appeared before a campus student conduct board whose members include students and professors.

``I don't think it would hurt to relook at the process we go through,'' Bradley said at a curators' meeting in St. Louis. ``I'm not saying the process is wrong, but there are a lot of people who had questions about it, and a lot of people who were upset about the Dixon situation.''

Absent from the meeting due to illness was Chancellor Brady Deaton, who had Dixon not decided to leave on his own would have been able to veto, uphold or revise the student conduct committee's confidential decision. But university President Tim Wolfe, who oversees the system's four campuses, defended the integrity of the disciplinary process.

``We have a process that involves the student conduct committee that has representatives from the various constituency groups and has been successful in looking into these situations and making decisions,'' Wolfe said Friday. ``That process was used effectively in this particular situation.''

Curator Wayne Goode, a former Missouri legislator who will succeed Bradley as the governing board's chairman, said the university had to balance the privacy of both Dixon and his accusers.

``We were advised by our (legal) counsel that we had to be careful with regard to those privacy issues, and I think we were,'' he said.

With no charges against him, Dixon received a lot of support amid the allegations. After he announced he would transfer, some students remained troubled by the backlash faced by women who allege sexual assault.

``Despite the incredible resources meant to educate on this issue, the sad truth is that there is still a culture of victim blaming that permeates MU and countless other college communities across the nation,'' student government president Xavier Billingsley wrote Wednesday in an open letter to the campus community titled ``For A Safer Mizzou.''

``Rape is rape - not only when a sexual advance is forcible, but any time one party says `no,''' Billinsgley continued. ``There have been no convictions borne out of the accusations discussed this past week, but to think that any student would want to shut out serious concerns about whether an awful crime was committed for the sake of athletics is incredibly disappointing. This shows that even though we have made great strides in dealing with sexual violence and violation, we still have a long way to go. ``

Dixon was suspended for two games in December 2010 for violating unspecified team rules under former Missouri coach Mike Anderson, who is now at Arkansas.

A 25-year-old Missouri graduate and former athletics department employee told the AP that Dixon forcibly had sex with her in January 2010 during his freshman year. The woman reported the alleged assault to campus police and was examined for signs of sexual assault at a hospital, but said she declined to press charges.

The campus police report was publicly leaked to reporters last week, about the same time a second allegation was being aired publicly. In that case, a current female student accused Dixon of sexual assault, disclosing the allegation in a Twitter exchange with a former Missouri player. She also filed a city police report in August, but prosecutors decided on Nov. 16 to not file charges.

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Alan Scher Zagier can be reached athttp://twitter.com/azagier

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Former Patriot and Eagle Pro Bowler Asante Samuel takes shot at Darrell Green

Former Patriot and Eagle Pro Bowler Asante Samuel takes shot at Darrell Green

Asante Samuel got hit Fourth of July fireworks started early Saturday morning with a negative tweet about NFL Hall-of-Famer Darrell Green.

The former Pro Bowler with the Patriots and the Eagles had a fine 11-year NFL career. He is a Super Bowl champion himself. But his out-of-nowhere tweets about Green, one of the NFL’s all-time great corners, were just…weird. 

Green was a dominant player on two Super Bowl champions, a seven-time Pro Bowler and an All-Pro in 1991. He was one of the fastest players in the league, a fearsome punt returner when necessary in playoff games and an all-around great player. Even other players from Samuel’s era were confused, including former Redskins safety Will Blackmon.

That's a pretty accurate description of the differences between Samuel's era and the way the game was played when Green was at his peak. Maybe he stuck around too long and maybe he wasn't close to the player he'd once been by the late 90s and early 2000s.

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But peak Darrell Green was an unquestioned Hall-of-Fame player. Teams didn't throw at him for a reason. When they did, they paid for it. Samuel got a little aggressive for a guy who might have cost the Pats an extra Super Bowl. 

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Tony Dungy, himself a great player and a Super Bowl champion as a player AND a coach, clapped back at Samuel for his ignorance of NFL history. 

That about says it all. 

For his part, Samuel doubled down responding to some tweets but by the afternoon he was starting to see the light. Sort of. 

 

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Ron Rivera reportedly hopes the Redskins can change their name before the 2020 season starts

Ron Rivera reportedly hopes the Redskins can change their name before the 2020 season starts

One day after his team announced they'd be launching a "thorough review" of its name, Ron Rivera told the Washington Post "it would be awesome" if the Redskins could complete the change before the 2020 season.

In fact, Rivera already has a few favorite ideas that he and Dan Snyder have tossed around in their recent, extensive discussions about the topic, though he wouldn't disclose them yet.

"We came up with a couple of names — two of them I really like," Rivera told Les Carpenter on Saturday.

In Washington's Friday statement, Rivera said, “This issue is of personal importance to me and I look forward to working closely with Dan Snyder to make sure we continue the mission of honoring and supporting Native Americans and our Military.”

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While talking with Carpenter, Rivera further explained that a new name must be respectful to both of those groups. 

"We want to do this in a positive way," Rivera said.

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It feels like more progress has been made toward a possible change in the past few days than the past handful of years.

Snyder, who once proclaimed his organization would "NEVER" make a switch, is clearly softening his stance now. That shift comes as outside pressure has really mounted from every direction since Thursday.

According to the Post, the owner and his new coach have really focused on going to a new name over the last month, with Rivera hoping to end the process soon.

"My eyes are wide open," Rivera said to Carpenter.

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