Mystics

Mystics

Over the last month, America has been having a long-overdue conversation about race, justice and equality in our society. At NBC Sports Washington, we wanted to further the dialogue by providing a forum for DMV-area sports figures who are thought leaders on these important issues.

NBC Sports Washington is launching the first part of an ongoing video series entitled Race in America this week. Natasha Cloud, Mike Locksley, and Ian Mahinmi joined Chis Miller for the first of these roundtable discussions to share their experiences, thoughts and how they’re using their platforms in this fight. To watch the full interview, click here.

Washington Mystics star Natasha Cloud is one of the many faces of the Black Lives Matter movement within Washington D.C. sports.

She's vocal on issues more than just race relations and police brutality. She is constantly out in the D.C. community, fighting for reform. She's so passionate about her cause, Cloud is opting-out of the 2020 season to continue the momentum gained in the BLM movement over the past month.
 
And just like several other Black Americans, she has her own harrowing story of how she had to deescalate a simple traffic stop with the police merely a block from her home. 

"I've been pulled over in D.C. before," Cloud said during NBC Sports Washington's recent Race in America roundtable. "It happened right before this last season. A white man, a white cop, approached me at 1:30 a.m. in the morning, coming home from shooting at Entertainment and Sports Arena. ... I'm by myself, in my car, driving home to my apartment and he approaches my car with his hand over his gun. The latch was already undone and I hadn't been doing anything but driving myself home from shooting. Because I'm in a nice car, because my side windows are tinted, he approached me aggressively and in the wrong manner. The ticket I got was a window tint, but that window tint could have been my life if I hadn't deescalated the issue."

RACE IN AMERICA: WATCH THE FULL ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION HERE

To ensure that she was able to get out of the situation safely, Cloud believed she was the one that had to remove the tension.

The officer kept looking in the back windows to see what was in the back seat. Cloud told the officer everything she was doing. When she was reaching to roll down the windows for him, even after he asked her to do so, she asked for permission.
 
Cloud said she asked twice if she could reach for her license and registration. Both times she told the police officer where exactly it was and where she was reaching.

"For me, I've always been taught, even though I grew up in an all-white family, my mom has made sure to tell me to put my hands at ten and two. Put your hands where you can see them. You say yes sir, you say no ma'am, be respectful," Cloud said.
 
But when the traffic stop was over, Cloud's work was not done. She made sure that she went to court, knowing that her window tints were too dark, but also to say her side of the story. Cloud felt the cop needed to be held accountable for how he approached the situation.
 
"I was lucky to have a minority judge, who also happened to be female and she ripped him a new [expletive] when I was in that courtroom."

RELATED: WHY CLOUD IS FOREGOING THE 2020 WNBA SEASON

This is part of the societal change that Cloud is continuously advocating. Police should not feel the need to further amplify a nonviolent situation and they should also be held accountable when they make a bad decision.
 
"We understand that not every cop is a bad cop," Cloud said. "There is a lot of good cops out there as well and there is more good cops than there is bad cops. But not every black person is a thug or a criminal and so you can't approach every black person as a threat. And I feel that is the No. 1 issue with [Black people's] interaction with police is that we're immediately seen as a threat. That [Black individuals are] immediately in defense mode because of the color of our skin. And that immediately escalates the situation even though it doesn't need to be escalated."

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To watch the full roundtable discussion, featuring Natasha Cloud, Maryland football head coach Mike Locksley and Washington Wizards star Ian Mahinmi, click here.

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