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Radio silence from Bryce Harper hasn't quieted Mark Lerner's confidence in Nationals

Radio silence from Bryce Harper hasn't quieted Mark Lerner's confidence in Nationals

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Fans on the sidewalks at FITTEAM Ballpark of the Palm Beaches are held back by wire fence, just a few feet away from players clicking past in spikes on concrete. It emulates two priorities: access and the idea the team’s managing principal owner, Mark Lerner, had when he was a kid at spring training.

“You want to be able to see your favorites,” Lerner said Friday.

When Lerner, 65, comes to West Palm Beach, he still does that. He stops in the clubhouse to distribute handshakes and hugs. Running into Anthony Rendon on a crosswalk near the fields really lit up Lerner, who is still using a cane following an amputation of his lower left leg in 2017 necessitated by the diagnosis of spindle cell sarcoma, a rare form of cancer.

Not in West Palm Beach is a player Lerner had a close relationship with. On the day Manny Machado was introduced in San Diego, Bryce Harper remained, to the astonishment of many, unemployed. 

Lerner last addressed Harper’s free agency when he sat for radio interviews, Dec. 10, the day Patrick Corbin was introduced. He said the Nationals were no longer in the mix for Harper. The Nationals offered Harper a 10-year, $300 million contract which had an expiration date: when free agency began, it would be retracted. Harper declined, vaulting the baseball world into a months-long saga filled with tension, misinformation and growing exasperation.

“Nothing’s certainly changed on our end; we’ve moved on, as I said back then,” Lerner told NBC Sports Washington. “We had to. There was no way we could wait around. Bryce I’m sure will make his decision, hopefully in the next few days. But, we filled out our roster and like I said, we wish him nothing but the best. There’s always that -- the door’s cracked a little bit. I have no clue at this point what they’re up to. I mean, we really haven’t heard from them in a couple months.”

The prospect of a wait was of prime concern before the season ended. Washington used its personal window to negotiate with Harper, producing a lucrative baseline offer, with the aforementioned end date. Not long after, Corbin received a six-year, $140 million from the organization, which stood throughout the offseason as the benchmark in both length and total value prior to Machado’s decision. If Harper accepted the Nationals original offer, they would not have been able to pay Corbin, according to a source.

The organization moved forward plugging holes at catcher, second base and in the bullpen. It deemed the current outfield foursome as more than satisfactory. Also looming was the possibility of another year over the competitive balance tax, something that prompted the team to start shuffling finances late last season when it was clear the playoffs were not an option.

“It’s a pretty severe penalty if you go over and it’s been our goal all year to stay under that,” Lerner said.

Which complicates the future. Anthony Rendon is entering the final year of his contract. Rendon and the team are open to an extension, which has been discussed here and there for 18 months. Rendon reiterated his position when speaking with reporters earlier this week. Lerner turned his visual affection for Rendon into words Friday. 

“We love Tony to death,” Lerner said. “He’s certainly one of the greatest players in the game today. He’s an even finer person. His activities with the youth baseball academy back in D.C. are phenomenal. He does it under the radar. It’s very important to him. Just a great example of the way a professional athlete should conduct himself. Like I said, he’s one of my favorites for a reason.”

Washington rose perennial losers upon coming to Washington to an organization with annual prominent expectations. It chose not to retain manager Dusty Baker, instead hiring Dave Martinez in an attempt to push the team beyond the first round. Martinez’s arrival came with the edict that something more than division titles and first-round bow outs were now necessary for the team. The Nationals finished 82-80 last year during a season filled with injuries, under-performance and often mediocre fundamental baseball. Lerner suffered through with the irritation of a typical fan.

“I have my routine [following losses]. I go into a closet and scream a little after,” Lerner said with a laugh. “No, no. That’s one thing that’s good about baseball. You’re going to play the next day. But I go home. I’m totally depressed. I won’t turn on the sports news or anything and get up the next morning, it’s a new day, get up and go after it again today. When I’m sitting down there, I’m very passionate as a fan. I’m yelling at the umpires like everybody else. I want to win. I hate losing exhibition games let alone regular-season games.”

Enter 2019. The Nationals are amid the favorites in a taught National League East. Short-term fixes frame the team’s mainstays. Max Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg and Corbin possess the three long-term commitments in the clubhouse. Rendon may be next. The Nationals want to retain that talent level, avoid the tax and put together a team with a chance to win the division or more. Harper’s talent made that possible when here. His price made it difficult going forward. They decided to try it without him. 

“Our goal every year is certainly to make the playoffs,” Lerner said. “In reality, we look back where we are in the world and where our needs are. It’s not just…certainly, we don’t want to go crazy with free agency. But we said when we first got the team, we’re going to build up the minor leagues, we’re going to get to a point where we can start to dabble in free agency, which we did with Jayson Werth, and when we find a need or a special player, we’re going to go after that player if it makes monetary sense for us. Our philosophy has never changed but, certainly, our goal is to make the playoffs and hopefully deep into the playoffs.”

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Phillies sign infielder Didi Gregorius, per report

Phillies sign infielder Didi Gregorius, per report

The Philadelphia Phillies have been rumored to have interest in third baseman Anthony Rendon, but they added a different infielder on Tuesday.

Former Yankees shortstop Didi Gregorius has signed a one-year deal with Philadelphia, according to MLB Network's Joel Sherman. 

The deal is worth $14 million, according to NBC Sports Philadelphia's Jim Salisbury.

The move reunites Gregorius with manager Joe Girardi, who was the Yankees skipper from 2008 through 2017. The 29-year-old infielder had spent the past five seasons with New York.

Although Gregorius has played almost every game of his career at shortstop, it is unclear what position he will play in Philadelphia. The Phillies have both Jean Segura and Scott Kingery capable of playing the middle infield positions. In 841 career games, Gregorius has played shortstop for 828 out of them, with 11 appearances at second base and two at third. 

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Four Nationals earn first-ever All-MLB honors

Four Nationals earn first-ever All-MLB honors

The success just keeps coming for the Nationals. 

On Tuesday, Major League Baseball announced the rosters for the first-ever All-MLB teams. Similar to the NBA and NFL's end of the season teams that feature the best at each position, baseball finally joined the party following the culmination of the 2019 campaign. A mixture of a fan vote and a panel of judges, plenty of D.C.'s finest players were featured.

Looking at the first team, Anthony Rendon took home the honors for third base. A .319 batting average, a league-leading 126 RBI and a spot among the finalists for the NL MVP support that decision.

Both Max Scherzer and newly re-signed Stephen Strasburg join Rendon on the All-MLB first team, representing two-fifths of the team's starting rotation that also features Gerrit Cole, Justin Verlander and Jacob deGrom. 

However, the list doesn't stop there for the Nationals. Young phenom Juan Soto earned All-MLB second team outfield honors. With 34 home runs, 110 RBI and a .282 average, Soto emerged as one of the best young stars of the game in 2019, which included a masterful postseason showing.

Out of the five nominees from the Nationals that were considered for placement on teams, only Patrick Corbin did not make it. Washington also trails only the Houston Astros in terms of teams with the most representatives as the team they would defeat in the World Series featured six players on the All-MLB teams. However, it's safe to say the Nationals are okay with finishing in second there while they admire the new shiny object in their trophy case.

A phenomenal season for the Nationals filled with incredible individual performances, it's no surprise there's plenty of Curly W's on the first-ever All-MLB teams.

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