NCAA

Former Hoya Marcus Derrickson signs a two-way contract with Golden State Warriors

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USA TODAY Sports

Former Hoya Marcus Derrickson signs a two-way contract with Golden State Warriors

Leaving the Georgetown Hoyas a season early is initially paying off for Marcus Derrickson. 

Less than a month before what would have been his senior season at Georgetown, the 6-7 forward has signed a two-way contract with the Golden State Warriors. 

Derrickson nabbed the second two-way position on the Warriors after an outstanding Summer League translated to a solid preseason.

Fitting right into the Warriors deep-ball oriented scheme, Derrickson was 6-16 from three point range during the five-game preseason. He's a versatile stretch-four that continues to develop and improve on his outside game. 

By signing a two-way contract, the former All-Big East Second teamer will have a chance to get called up to the two-time defending NBA champions at any point this season for up to 45 days. The remaining time will be with the Warriors' G-league affiliate the Santa Cruz Warriors

This arrangement will earn Derrickson a contract of $75,000 and a prorated amount for however much time he is practicing/ playing with Golden State. 

If he is called up to the NBA for more than the allotted 45 days, then the Warriors are obligated to give him a minimum rookie contract. 

Derrickson continues to prove himself as the list of aspiring players dwindles. As each contract begins to near its end, the Warriors time after time offer another opportunity.

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No. 24 Maryland uses big second half run to take down Ohio State 72-62

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No. 24 Maryland uses big second half run to take down Ohio State 72-62

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) -- Anthony Cowan Jr. scored 19 points, Bruno Fernando had 14 points and 10 rebounds and No. 24 Maryland defeated Ohio State 72-62 Saturday to remain unbeaten at home in the Big Ten.

The Terrapins (21-7, 12-5) used a 13-0 run to take a 52-36 lead. Although the margin dwindled to two points with 5:27 left, Maryland held on to improve to 14-2 at home, including 7-0 in the conference.

With three Big Ten games left, including two at home, the Terrapins are in fourth place and in position to secure a double bye in the conference tournament.

Fernando scored all of his points after halftime, and reserve freshman Serrel Smith Jr. contributed a career-high 14 points for Maryland. Despite a slow start, Fernando secured his ninth double-double in his last 10 games.

Duane Washington Jr. scored 15 and Andre Wesson had 13 for Ohio State (17-10, 7-9). The Buckeyes have lost three of four and nine of their last 14.

Maryland led 39-36 before Fernando scored six points and Cowan added five in the pivotal 13-0 spree.

Fernando started the surge with a three-point play, Smith hit a jumper and Cowan followed with a 3-pointer. After Ohio State missed its seventh straight shot, Cowan was fouled on an attempt from beyond the arc and sank two from the line.

Fernando capped the run with a foul shot and a short jumper.

The Buckeyes stormed back, getting points from five different players in a 19-5 spurt that made it 57-55.

Then it was Maryland's turn. Smith was fouled on a shot from beyond the arc and made all three free throws. Darryl Morsell followed with a pair of foul shots, and Aaron Wiggins capped the 7-0 run with a dunk off a pass from Fernando, who had snagged the rebound of a miss by Morsell.

That was enough to assure the Terrapins of a series sweep of the Buckeyes. The Terps won at Ohio State 75-61 on Jan. 18.

Cowan scored 10 points to stake Maryland to a 33-28 halftime lead. The Terrapins missed five of their first six shots before going 12 for 18 with four 3-pointers.

Fernando missed both his shots and collected only four rebounds in nearly 18 minutes of play.

POOR ENCORE

Coming off a 22-point performance against Northwestern, Ohio State's 6-foot-9 sophomore Kaleb Wesson was limited to seven points on 3 for 12 shooting. He came in averaging a team-high 14.7 points.

AYALA AILING

Maryland starting guard Eric Ayala left in the first half and did not return after scoring five points in 10 minutes. A team official said the freshman "was not feeling well."

BIG PICTURE

Ohio State: The Buckeyes are sinking fast after losing only once before 2019. They shot 35 percent in the second half and 36.5 percent for the game.

Maryland: The Terrapins keep surprising foes in the Big Ten. Despite relying heavily on freshmen, Maryland remains in the upper tier of the conference and might be tough to beat in the Big Ten Tournament.

UP NEXT

Ohio State: Hosts Iowa on Tuesday night, the rematch of a game won by the Hawkeyes 72-62 last month.

Maryland: Faces Penn State on Wednesday night. The Terps beat the Nittany Lions 66-59 on Dec. 1.

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Inside Zion Williamson's injury, a busted shoe and a busted knee

Inside Zion Williamson's injury, a busted shoe and a busted knee

In the opening moments of last night's matchup between the Duke Blue Devils and the North Carolina Tar Heels at Cameron Indoor Stadium, the sports world came to a standstill.

The most anticipated clash of the season between two of the most storied programs in the history of college basketball made this the big-ticket event that you did not want to miss. 

Tickets for the bout reached astronomical numbers, rivaling the Super Bowl that took place just weeks ago. Waiting until the morning of the event to purchase a seat? $2,755 on StubHub.

With Ken Griffey Jr., President Barack Obama, and Spike Lee in attendance for the highly-touted scrum, Durham, North Carolina, was the place to be.

And then just like that, thirty seconds after the tip, the sports world stopped.

Dribbling around the key, on the first possession of the night, Zion Williamson's shoe disintegrated in front of the world. The defect caused him to slide, his knee buckling as a result of it and he landed on the floor in pain.

Williamson, the presumed #1 Pick in the 2019 NBA Draft, the most brute, physical specimen that college basketball has seen in decades, became human. 

James Gilbert, a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon at The Centers for Advanced Orthopaedics who has served as the team physician for Duke Sports Medicine, US Soccer, DC United, the Dallas Cowboys and the Dallas Mavericks, was watching the contest at Cameron Indoor on television last evening and saw the event in real time.

"I don't know if there's ever been an event bigger than this directly in the public eye," said Gilbert. "I've seen it occur in soccer because they have studs in the turf, but never on a basketball court. He's a one in a generation athlete."

Despite being a lifelong fan of his alma mater and wanting to see the most polarizing force in recent memory, Gilbert trusts the judgment and decision to keep Zion out for the remainder of the game.

“I know the doctors at Duke; they would never jeopardize an athlete,” he said. "He's lucky the end result is just a knee sprain, it could have been a lot worse. It's good that the main hospital is only 200 yards away from where he fell."

After Coach Mike Krzyzewski announced that Williamson had suffered a knee sprain, many people wanted the details. How bad was it? How long is he going to be out? 

As in consistent Duke fashion, no info was revealed on the injury and no specifics were given. 

Speculation about the injury began to go mainstream. Questions arose about his future in college basketball, whether he should or should not sit out the rest of his freshman, and likely only season, at the collegiate ranks to prepare for the NBA Draft.

"I've met Zion, I'm sure he wanted to go back in," said Gilbert. "He's had no prior knee injuries to my knowledge and it appears to just be a result of the defective shoe. These shoes are made to grip and cut. They need to start making shoes for larger than average athletes like him."

Gilbert doesn't expect Williamson to be out long, he believes the team was extra cautious in handling last night's situation. 

Zion Williamson will have all the time he needs to recover, and college basketball will be ready for his return, whenever that may be.