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Hokies' tight end Dalton Keene drafted by New England Patriots in third round

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Hokies' tight end Dalton Keene drafted by New England Patriots in third round

Last season, it was revealed the New England Patriots were in desperate need of a tight end upgrade after the "retirement" of Rob Gronkowski. In the third round of the NFL draft, the Patriots addressed that issue by drafting two tight ends, one being Virginia Tech's Dalton Keene.

Keene was selected 101st overall in the third round. He was the second straight TE off the board for New England, who drafted UCLA's Devin Asiasi just 10 picks prior.

The 6-foot-4 Keene finished his junior season with the Hokies in a pretty mundane fashion. He caught 21 passes for 240 yards (11.4 yards per catch), scoring five touchdowns. But what makes Keene appealing was his versatility in multiple positions on the offense. He can catch, block and run.

Last season he lined up in the Virginia Tech backfield for 11 carries for 33 yards. While not impressive, his movement threw off opposing defenses and forced teams to account for a ground and pound scheme. Sounds like a fit for Bill Belichick's style of play.

At 253 lbs, he brings nice positional size to the Patriots and is roughly the same size as Asiasi.

Last season the Patriots desperately needed a tight end after years of the position being a strength. Their position group only had 37 total receptions, 419 yards and a touchdown.

Both Keene and Asiasi could find a home in the Patriots offense. They have employed a two-tight end system before and is a regular formation for Belichick's offense. However, the question is who will be throwing the ball to them.

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Will Ivy League's fall sports decision affect college football?

Will Ivy League's fall sports decision affect college football?

As the days of summer continue to be checked off the calendar, college football finds itself facing a diminishing amount of days left to finalize its plans for seeing football on college campuses this fall, if at all. One conference might be ready to make the call, at least according to some of their coaches.
 
The Ivy League has announced its final decision regarding fall sports, college football most notably, will come sometime this week. According to The Athletic, multiple coaches have stated "that they expect Wednesday's announcement to be that the league is moving all fall sports, including football, to spring 2021."


 
Could college football be headed for a new home on our calendars? How would that happen and who would ultimately make that decision? 
 
The decision for the Ivy League to move fall sports to the spring would be the first declaration from a Division 1 conference of its kind and could set the tone for the other FBS schools. The Ivy League was the first to cancel its basketball conference tournament back on March 12, under scrutiny at the time, due to the Coronavirus pandemic. It was soon to be followed by the other conferences once the severity of the COVID-19 outbreak was universally understood.
 
Harvard has already announced it will allow only 40% of undergraduates on campus in the fall, and all teaching is set to be conducted remotely. 
 
Moving all college football to spring 2021 is one of many scenarios being examined by athletic directors, school presidents and conference commissioners. Penn State athletic director Sandy Barbour has called spring football a "last resort," citing the proximity to the 2021 season. The realities of the varying concerns surrounding playing, including scheduling, are legitimate. 

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Multiple programs including Kansas, Kansas State and Houston, have already been forced to suspend voluntary workout because of COVID-19 spikes among athletes. Those cases combined with a recent spike in COVID-19 cases continues to cast a shadow over the likelihood of college football being played as normal this fall.
 
The only thing that remains constant throughout this entire ordeal has been the ever-present fluidity of the world we inhabit. Those able to retain the flexibility and skill to adjust and react to new and pertinent information will be best suited to get us closer to seeing our fall traditions once again, even if it means seeing them in the spring. 

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Former Penn State guard transferred after head coach Pat Chambers made 'noose' comment

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Former Penn State guard transferred after head coach Pat Chambers made 'noose' comment

During his freshman year as a member of the Penn State men’s basketball team, guard Rasir Bolton says he was subject to “subtle repercussions” after reporting an incident in which head coach Pat Chambers said he wanted to “loosen the noose that’s around your neck.”

Now playing for Iowa State, Bolton claims that he went to the school after Chambers made the comment but never received an apology from him. He added that his family didn’t hear back from Penn State’s Integrity Office for six months while in the meantime being provided with a psychologist who wanted to teach him “ways to deal with Coach Chambers’ personality type.”

“A noose; symbolic of lynching, defined as one of the most powerful symbols directed at African Americans invoking the history of lynching, slavery and racial terrorism,” Bolton wrote on Twitter. “Due to other interactions with Coach, I knew this was no slip of the tongue.”

Bolton, who's originally from Petersburg, Virginia, and attended Massanutten Academy for high school, played 32 games for the Nittany Lions in 2018-19, averaging 11.6 points per game with nine starts. However, he says teammates informed him he couldn’t be trusted because he wasn’t “all in” on the program.

RELATED: 2020 FIVE-STAR RECRUIT MAKUR MAKER COMMITS TO HOWARD

“I didn’t realize that word would hurt him, and I am truly, truly sorry for that,” Chambers told The Undefeated in a story published Monday.

Four days prior to the interaction with Bolton, Chambers was suspended one game for pushing freshman guard Myles Dread in the chest during a timeout. Penn State finished 14-18 that season before turning things around with a 21-10 record this year.

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