NCAA

King accounts for 3 TDs, leads Houston past Navy, 24-14

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King accounts for 3 TDs, leads Houston past Navy, 24-14

HOUSTON  -- Houston's defense slowed Navy in the second half, and the offense carried the momentum from there.

D'Eriq King threw for 277 yards and a touchdown and ran for two more scores to lead Houston to a 24-14 win over Navy on Friday.

King completed 21 of 27 passes and found Steven Dunbar for a 61-yard touchdown pass to give the Cougars (7-4, 5-3 American) a 21-14 lead with 14 minutes left in the game. King hit Dunbar in stride along the right sideline, and Dunbar broke one tackle at the Navy 40 and went untouched from there for the score.

"The defense played great all day," King said. "We got momentum off the defense. We saw those guys make plays, and we wanted to help them by making plays ourselves."

Houston's defense shut Navy out in the second half and held the Midshipmen to 79 yards and six first downs.

"It was tackle or dive there to get what you can get," Ed Oliver, who finished with a career-high 14 tackles and 3 tackles for a loss, said. "We stopped the dive. We were really locked in on our assignments, and we shut it down."

The 14 points was a season low for Navy.

"Consistent four quarters, consistent play," Houston coach Major Applewhite said. "For us to be able to create that many stops and punt opportunities is tremendous."

Dunbar finished with 142 yards receiving on eight catches.

King, who started his third straight game, rushed for 57 yards and scored on runs of 9 and 2 yards, with the second tying it at 14 with 3:27 left in the third and capping a 14-play, 90-yard drive. Caden Novikoff tacked on a 35-yard field goal with 7:57 remaining to up the lead to 24-14.

"We made plays in the passing game," Applewhite said. "Quarterback made some runs. Duke (Catalon) ran the ball well. We played like we could play."

Malcolm Perry rushed for 82 yards and a touchdown on 15 carries, and Anthony Gargiulo added 71 yards and a touchdown on 16 carries to lead Navy (6-5, 4-4), which lost its fifth in the last six games. The Midshipmen outrushed Houston 217-103, but had 167 yards rushing at the half.

"Obviously, a disappointing loss," Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo said. "We left some points out there in the first half that came back to bite us."

Perry tied it 7-7 with a 12-yard touchdown run with 13:42 left in the second, and Gargiulo gave the Midshipmen a 14-7 lead with six minutes remaining in the first half.

"Houston played well defensively," Niumatalolo said. "We just can't sustain ourselves. It's kind of the story of our season. We can't put stuff together consistently. Obviously, Houston knew that. They kept their safeties back to see if we could grind it out and we couldn't. We couldn't execute the whole way downfield."

Linell Bonner finished with eight catches for 98 yards for Houston, which won its third out of the last four games. Houston outgained Navy 380-291.

Pac-12 cancels all sports for calendar year amid coronavirus pandemic

Pac-12 cancels all sports for calendar year amid coronavirus pandemic

The Pac-12 conference has announced that it will not have a fall sports season and will delay all sports for the rest of the calendar year. The decision, which was expected, became official on Tuesday.

As of now, the conference will re-evaluate the standing for all sports after January 1, 2021.

“The health, safety and well-being of our student-athletes and all those connected to Pac-12 sports has been our number one priority since the start of this current crisis,” Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said.  “Our student-athletes, fans, staff and all those who love college sports would like to have seen the season played this calendar year as originally planned, and we know how disappointing this is.”

“All of the Pac-12 presidents and chancellors understand the importance of this decision, and the disappointment it will create for our student-athletes, the coaches, support staff and all of our fans,” Michael H. Schill, president of the University of Oregon, said. “Ultimately, our decision was guided by science and a deep commitment to the health and welfare of student-athletes. We certainly hope that the Pac-12 will be able to return to competition in the New Year.”

The decision came shortly after the Big Ten Conference decided to cancel its fall campaign. As of now, the Big Ten is hoping to potentially play in the spring.

Prior to the Pac-12 officially postponing the season, there were already legitimate questions if sports would be played at all in the fall. Citing health concerns and racial injustice issues, football players throughout the conference had come together and threatened to opt out of the 2020 season if the Pac-12 did not meet certain demands for improvement in different areas.

With two Power 5 conferences bowing out of the fall campaign, the fate of the college football season rests largely on the shoulders of the Big 12, SEC and ACC. All conferences are continuously meeting to come to a decision. A report on Monday stated that the ACC is set on playing the season.

There are still numerous players, coaches and powerful voices that want to see football in the coming months. Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence helped propel the #WeWantToPlay movement on social media which featured Power 5 athletes asking for sports to continue with increased protocols, guaranteed eligibility and more. President Donald Trump tweeted his support for the movement.

Even with some wanting to move forward, the risk of playing through the pandemic may outweigh the reward. Besides the initial fear of infection and contact, underlying issues connected to the coronavirus that has been found in college athletes have programs and administrators concerned about the long term impact of the virus.

For now, it's unknown who exactly could be taking the field in the fall, But what is known is that the Pac-12 is joining the Big Ten on the sidelines. 

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Big Ten announces cancellation of fall college football season

Big Ten announces cancellation of fall college football season

After speculation and uncertainty surrounding the college football season grew in recent days, the Big Ten Conference has announced that it is canceling its football season for the fall amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

“The mental and physical health and welfare of our student-athletes has been at the center of every decision we have made regarding the ability to proceed forward,” Big Ten Commissioner Kevin Warren said in a statement. “As time progressed and after hours of discussion with our Big Ten Task Force for Emerging Infectious Diseases and the Big Ten Sports Medicine Committee, it became abundantly clear that there was too much uncertainty regarding potential medical risks to allow our student-athletes to compete this fall."

In the release, the Big Ten announced it will "continue to evaluate a number of options regarding these sports, including the possibility of competition in the spring."

News from the Big Ten differs from speculation and reports coming out of the ACC which state that the conference is set on making the season work in the coming months.

The Mountain West Conference announced it would be canceling its fall season as well on Monday, with hopes to play in the spring instead. 

The Big Ten decision does not come as much of a surprise. It was reported that the Big Ten was going to call the season off on Tuesday. Dan Patrick reported that news and said that the conference had an internal meeting on Sunday resulting in a 12-2 vote to not play a college football season this fall. Nebraska and Iowa were the two conference programs to vote in favor of playing this season.

Additionally, signs of hesitation were shown in the days leading up to the announcement. The Big Ten recently postponed its ramping-up period that included full-pad practices. The Big Ten did, however, recently unveil its 2020 conference-only schedule, leading to confusion in terms of what its stance was on playing football in 2020. Now, there is no more speculation. 

The Pac-12 Conference is reportedly expected to make the same choice as the Big Ten, but has yet to make an official decision. 

While it's understandable that the conference is prioritizing the health and safety of its players amid a pandemic that continues to impact thousands on a daily basis, the news is sure to upset players and coaches around the college football world. Big names such as Clemson QB Trevor Lawrence and Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh, among others, have been campaigning to continue the season with the #WeWantToPlay movement on social media.

With players from all Power 5 conference uniting, they have asked for universal health and safety protocols, opt-outs for athletes that want them, guaranteed eligibility and voices from all conferences to be included in the decision. President Donald Trump also weighed in, supporting the call to play football in the fall on Monday and reiterating that in statements on Tuesday.

Despite the large faction that was on board with the status quo for now, the Big Ten will not be part of a potential college football season in the coming months. There is a chance that the season is played in the spring. Reports indicated that Warren and leaders around the conference preferred that idea, but no decision has been made at this time.

The Big Ten has now spoken, and the Pac-12 is expected to follow suit soon. With two of the five major conferences backing out, it will be up to the SEC, Big 12 and ACC to dictate the future of a 2020 college football season. 

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