NCAA

Maryland WR Rakim Jarrett posts picture working out with Redskins' Dwayne Haskins and Terry McLaurin

Maryland WR Rakim Jarrett posts picture working out with Redskins' Dwayne Haskins and Terry McLaurin

The expectations for wide receiver Rakim Jarrett in College Park are extremely high after the high-profile recruit made the flip from LSU to Maryland this past December.

As the wideout is preparing for his first season with the Terps, he's working out with some of the best players in the area.

Jarrett posted a picture on his Twitter account yesterday with two Redskins players, quarterback Dwayne Haskins and wideout Terry McLaurin, and the three of them appeared to be working out together.

The backstory as to how the Terps wideout was able to link up with the Redskins duo is unclear, but Terps head coach Mike Locksley could have had something to do with it.

Jarrett's commitment to the Terps was the best recruit Locksley has landed since taking over as the Terps head coach a year ago. The wideout is Maryland's first five-star signee since 2014 and the highest-rated wide receiver the team has landed since Stefon Diggs in 2011.

Although he ended up playing his college ball at Ohio State, Haskins has had a solid relationship with Locksley for years and was originally committed to Maryland, partially because of Locksley being an assistant at the time (Haskins de-committed once Locksley wasn't retained in 2015). 

Regardless, Jarrett being able to work out with both an NFL quarterback and NFL wide receiver before even playing a snap of college football is impressive and a great sight for Terps' fans.

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Former Penn State guard transferred after head coach Pat Chambers made 'noose' comment

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Former Penn State guard transferred after head coach Pat Chambers made 'noose' comment

During his freshman year as a member of the Penn State men’s basketball team, guard Rasir Bolton says he was subject to “subtle repercussions” after reporting an incident in which head coach Pat Chambers said he wanted to “loosen the noose that’s around your neck.”

Now playing for Iowa State, Bolton claims that he went to the school after Chambers made the comment but never received an apology from him. He added that his family didn’t hear back from Penn State’s Integrity Office for six months while in the meantime being provided with a psychologist who wanted to teach him “ways to deal with Coach Chambers’ personality type.”

“A noose; symbolic of lynching, defined as one of the most powerful symbols directed at African Americans invoking the history of lynching, slavery and racial terrorism,” Bolton wrote on Twitter. “Due to other interactions with Coach, I knew this was no slip of the tongue.”

Bolton, who's originally from Petersburg, Virginia, and attended Massanutten Academy for high school, played 32 games for the Nittany Lions in 2018-19, averaging 11.6 points per game with nine starts. However, he says teammates informed him he couldn’t be trusted because he wasn’t “all in” on the program.

RELATED: 2020 FIVE-STAR RECRUIT MAKUR MAKER COMMITS TO HOWARD

“I didn’t realize that word would hurt him, and I am truly, truly sorry for that,” Chambers told The Undefeated in a story published Monday.

Four days prior to the interaction with Bolton, Chambers was suspended one game for pushing freshman guard Myles Dread in the chest during a timeout. Penn State finished 14-18 that season before turning things around with a 21-10 record this year.

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Maryland's Mike Locksley, Damon Evans comment on college football's diversity problem

Maryland's Mike Locksley, Damon Evans comment on college football's diversity problem

In a predominantly white college football landscape, Maryland became the first school in the FBS with a Black president, athletic director and head football coach Wednesday by hiring Dr. Darryll Pines to lead the university. 

Damon Evans is one of 14 Black athletic directors in the FBS, while Mike Locksley is one of 14 Black head coaches in Division I. Over 86% of D-1 head coaches are white and if you exclude Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), the percentage of white coaches in Division-I football rises to nearly 93%.

Black head coaches aren't afforded an extended window to run their program either. White coaches are considered to have more time to build a program, leaving Black head coaches with undesirable results, less time to turn things around and worse odds at getting another job because of it.

In a story from Yahoo Sports' Lila Bromberg, Evans and Locksley shared their thoughts on college football's lack of diversity and how they're striving for an increased presence of African Americans in the nation's top programs. 

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“We haven't been afforded those opportunities of five years at one position to really build it and grow it the way that you need to when the jobs that some of us take or have to take open up," Locksley said. "So there's no doubt there's some things that hinder our ability to have the success we need to have to keep that door open for others.

With Evans heading the athletic department, Locksley has the job security to where he can build Maryland's football program to the best of his ability.

Just one season into his tenure, Locksley has already turned some heads on the recruiting trail. He recently secured a big-name transfer in quarterback Taulia Tagovalioa and was one of Gonzaga superstar quarterback Caleb Williams' final three schools before the upcoming senior chose Oklahoma. 

“We all know the responsibility that we carry as Black men in these leadership positions,” Evans said. “Not only the responsibility to the institution as a whole in carrying out our jobs and the responsibility to our communities, but we also have a responsibility to help to grow the pool of minority candidates and to help others rise through the ranks to be able to achieve what we've been able to.”

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