Redskins

NFLPA's collusion case against NFL denied by judge

NFLPA's collusion case against NFL denied by judge

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) In probably his last NFL-related ruling, U.S. District Judge David Doty sided with the league this time.

The NFL Players Association's claim of collusion by league owners was rejected on Monday by Doty, who has previously sided with the players during more than two decades of judging NFL labor matters. The league lost enough key decisions under Doty's jurisdiction that it twice tried to have him removed from his role as the sport's legal referee, alleging impartiality.

But as Doty heard arguments in his Minneapolis federal courtroom in September, the league expressed no concern with the judge and confidence it would win this case. Doty even asked attorneys during the hearing if they had a problem with his presence in the process.

That faith was rewarded. NFL spokesman Greg Aielllo said Doty's decision ``speaks for itself.''

NFLPA spokesman George Atallah said the players respect Doty's order, but ``it does not mean that the owners didn't collude.'' Atallah said the union will ``pursue the facts and the law to protect players regardless of any outcome'' and said it will ``consider any and all other options in light of this decision.''

The players filed their lawsuit in May, claiming the NFL imposed a secret salary cap during the uncapped 2010 season that cost the players at least $1 billion. Four teams were punished for overspending and undermining competitive balance, with Dallas and Washington hit most severely with future-cap reductions. The union alleged owners conspired to set a covert cap to hold down salaries in 2010, but the league denied doing so.

The NFL also argued the collusion claim was a moot point, citing a clause in the current collective bargaining agreement in which the players relinquished the right to sue and all pending claims related to the 1993 Reggie White settlement were thrown out. They sought at least $4 billion in damages, but Doty wrote in his ruling that because the union ``released the claims it attempts to assert'' he is ``without jurisdiction'' to further enforce the White settlement. That's the class-action lawsuit that paved the way for the modern unrestricted free agency system and served as the backbone of the previous CBA.

Because Doty oversaw that case, he stayed in the role until the new CBA was reached in August 2011, trumping the prior agreement. But the players, in their collusion claim, asked to reopen the White settlement because their allegation stemmed from 2010, before the lockout.

In March 2011, Doty issued a key order favoring the players in a dispute over $4 billion in television revenue they contended the league held back to survive a long lockout. The claim was ultimately resolved as part of the new CBA.

Doty also ruled in 2008 that Michael Vick could keep more than $16 million in signing bonus money that the Atlanta Falcons sought to recover after the quarterback pleaded guilty to dogfighting charges.

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Derrius Guice understands why Redskins fans are frustrated, but he's looking ahead

Derrius Guice understands why Redskins fans are frustrated, but he's looking ahead

Derrius Guice is a very positive person. Unfortunately, he's playing for a team right now that's shrouded in negativity.

The Redskins have played 10 games this season, and they've walked off the field as losers in nine of those contests. They've gotten rid of their head coach, and many are wondering how many other major changes will come.

And when it comes to the fans, many — if not most — are furious with the direction of the franchise. Guice is noticing that, too.

"It just sucks when I score, or someone else scores, and our team posts a picture to Instagram or Twitter and everything under it is just, 'Fire this, fire that, we suck," Guice told JP Finlay in a 1-on-1 interview on the Redskins Talk podcast. "That doesn't help anything."

The running back understands that frustration. However, he wants those who are angry to know one thing: While this current roster is obviously responsible for the 2019 issues, they aren't responsible for the two-decade-long slump that's affected the organization.

"I'm new here," Guice said. "I understand some of these fans have been here 20-30 years, but like, there's a lot of guys on this team that are new. Y'all can't bring all that negativity to us like we've been here 20 years. I don't think that's fair to us players."

That's what makes this situation so difficult for those on the field and those who watch those on the field. Fans have been on this unsatisfying ride for far too long, yet most of the players hopped on a stop or two ago. 

So people who post those hateful comments or send those angry DMs are doing so because they've seen a handful of free agency and draft classes bust, and because they've seen numerous coaches come in and fail, and they've been lied to repeatedly about how "close" the Redskins are. They aren't necessarily trying to take it out on Guice or Dwayne Haskins or Landon Collins, it just appears that way.

Guice, for one, is trying his best to improve how he handles that side of being an athlete. He's also choosing to focus on those who've stayed on his side through what's been a trying first couple of seasons in the league.

For all the negativity he encounters, he's grateful for those who remain positive like him.

"A guy that's been there two years and has only played two real games, there's a lot of fans that have still never left my side since I got drafted," Guice said. "That's something I always have to cherish."

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Report: Phillies sign another National, bring on assistant hitting coach Joe Dillion

Report: Phillies sign another National, bring on assistant hitting coach Joe Dillion

When you win a championship the way the Nationals did, other teams are going to try and capture that magic in any way they can. 

Of course, Anthony Rendon and Stephen Strasburg are at risk of leaving town and free agency, but now the Davey Martinez will have to make changes to his coaching staff as well. 

According to Jim Salisbury, the Phillies hired Washington's assistant hitting coach Joe Dillon as their new hitting coach under manager Joe Girardi. 

Working with hitting coach Kevin Long, Dillon helped the Nationals lead the national league in on-base percentage while ranking second in batting average and OPS. 

The Phillies struggled at the plate in 2019, ranking 22nd in batting average, 19th in on-base percentage and 17th in OPS. Despite acquiring Bryce Harper, Jean Segura and JT Realmuto last offseason, Philadelphia boasted an anemic offense under former hitting coach John Mallee. 

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