Redskins

No. 13 Florida wins 79-58 at Yale

No. 13 Florida wins 79-58 at Yale

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) Kenny Boynton matched his career high with 28 points on 8-for-10 shooting from 3-point range and No. 13 Florida used a 26-3 run spanning the halves to beat Yale 79-58 on Sunday night.

Will Yeguette had 14 points and Mike Rosario added 13 for the Gators (10-2), whose losses were to No. 3 Arizona and No. 25 Kansas State. The Gators shot 60 percent from the field for the game (30 for 50), including 9 of 17 from 3-point range.

Justin Sears had 15 points and Javier Duren added 14 for the Bulldogs (5-11), who have lost four of five.

Yale was hanging around for most of the first half, getting to 21-20 with 5:27 to play in the opening 20 minutes. Then came the run and it was a matter of Florida deciding how large a margin of victory it would be.

Florida's 14-3 run to close the half made it 35-23, its largest lead until then. Yale missed six of seven shots in the run and had two turnovers.

That wasn't the worst of it. The Gators scored the first 12 points of the second half, the run closing on a 3-pointer by Boynton that made it 47-23 with 18:17 to play. The Bulldogs, who had turnovers on four consecutive possessions in the run - all in the backcourt, called three timeouts within the first 5 minutes.

Florida, which played its starters until the final 2 minutes, kept its lead around 20 points for most of the second half.

You know it was a big game at the John J. Lee Amphitheater because all four balconies were full behind the baskets, including the one that is for standees only. What was missing was the Yale band, who like other students were on break. There were 10 NBA scouts, however, in the lower section next to where the band would have been.

After the opening flurry of turnovers by both teams - Yale's didn't include a missed alley-oop pass way above the rim like Florida's did - the Gators had the 21-20 lead with 5:27 to play in the first half. That didn't sit well with the Florida fans in attendance, the ones with some orange mixed in with the blue.

The Gator fans even got into a ``chomp'' with about 8 minutes to play.

The Yale fans, on the other hand were loving it early but there were several occasions where they moaned when the Bulldogs wouldn't take advantage of numbers on the break. They also wanted more 3-point attempts but those are hard to come by with Florida's size advantage on the wings.

Yale was 2 of 9 from 3-point range in the first half while the Gators were 2 of 6. But Florida shot 54.2 percent overall (13 of 24) while the Bulldogs hit 36 percent (9 of 25).

Florida's Erik Murphy didn't play because of bruised ribs. The 6-foot-10 senior missed a chance to play near his native South Kingstown, R.I., about a 2-hour drive from New Haven. Yeguette started in Murphy's place.

The Gators are 7-2 all-time against Ivy League schools but this was their first time as a visitor. This series was a 2-for-1 so since Florida won 90-70 last season at Gainesville, the Bulldogs have one more trip to the O'Connell Center, which holds 12,633. Payne-Whitney Gym on Yale's campus holds 2,532.

Florida was Yale's home opponent between two Division III schools - Albertus Magnus, a 112-63 victory, and Oberlin on Saturday.

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There's reason for excitement about Trey Quinn, and the numbers back it up

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There's reason for excitement about Trey Quinn, and the numbers back it up

No Redskins receiver caught more than 45 passes last season, and the team lost their steadiest wideout of the last two years when Jamison Crowder signed with the Jets in free agency. 

Even with that, the Redskins coaching staff remains bullish on the team's pass catchers for this season, and second-year pro Trey Quinn is a big reason why.

Last season as a seventh-round rookie, Quinn made the team after showing great hands and a consistent ability to get separation from defenders. Listed at 6-foot and 200 pounds, Quinn is a natural slot receiver in the NFL, but last year, that role very clearly belonged to Crowder. 

With Crowder gone, that role has changed.

"Trey Quinn has taken over the inside slot role," Redskins head coach Jay Gruden said during minicamp. 
"He’s confident, he’s quick, he’s got strong hands, he’s physical, [and] he’s tough," 

The toughness will be key, as Quinn twice landed on the injured reserve list in his rookie season. He played in just three games last year but made an impact when he was on the field, grabbing nine catches and scoring a touchdown in Dallas. 

Looking at Crowder's production over the last four seasons, Quinn will get lots of opportunities.

In four seasons starting in 2015, Crowder played in 56 games and averaged 5.8 targets per game. He started in 28 games, and in those games, his targets doubled to 11.75 per start. That's a lot of action for the slot role in Gruden's offense. 

Looking at the Redskins potential quarterbacks, Quinn would be an asset for any of them. Case Keenum's game definitely works well with skilled slot WRs - like Stefon Diggs in Minnesota two seasons ago. If rookie Dwayne Haskins gets the starting job, he could certainly use a consistent target in the middle of the field, and Quinn should serve that role. Should Colt McCoy take over as Redskins starter, he and Quinn actually found success on the field last season, particularly against the Cowboys. 

In fact, Keenum is already speaking highly of the former Mr. Irrelevant. 

"Trey Quinn is going to be really special," Keenum said during minicamp. 

Health is never a guarantee. Quinn struggled to stay on the field as a rookie, but when he was on the field, he did not struggle. Redskins receivers coach Ike Hilliard is typically a man of few words, but even he praised Quinn this offseason and considers him a breakout candidate for the 2019 season.


Summer is the time for optimism in the NFL. Nobody has fumbled, players are mostly healthy, and nothing has gone wrong. 

With Quinn, there is plenty of optimism. More importantly, based on Crowder's targets, there are reasons to buy the excitement around Quinn. 

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Ted Leonsis' patience in GM search is a calculated risk with potential to backfire

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Ted Leonsis' patience in GM search is a calculated risk with potential to backfire

The decision for who will run the Wizards front office long-term is not imminent. In fact, it may not even be that close.

That's according to majority owner Ted Leonsis, who again displayed a surprising level of patience in his months-long process to replace Ernie Grunfeld, this time in an interview with the Washington Post. Leonsis says he does not expect to finalize the hire until after the start of free agency on June 30.

That effectively means that if they hire someone from outside the organization, that person will have little to no impact on the team this offseason. That may sound like hyperbole, but just look at the calendar.

The NBA Draft is on Thursday. The deadline on Jabari Parker's $20 million team option is June 29. Free agency will begin on June 30 and qualifying offers for restricted free agents are due that day as well.

By the second week of July, the Las Vegas Summer League will be in full swing. But the NBA offseason, at least the most important parts of it, will be pretty much over. 

The Wizards will have already made their draft pick(s) and held the press conference. They will have likely settled matters one way or another with restricted free agents Tomas Satoransky, Thomas Bryant and Bobby Portis. And by then, the phone could be ringing off the hook with trade offers for Bradley Beal.

Leonsis, though, is continuing to take the longview, knowing no one will really care in a few years if he nails the hire and the franchise is quickly steered back onto the right course.

The drawn out timeline raises many questions and the most obvious one is what they are waiting for. The NBA Finals are over. If they were waiting to talk to someone involved in that series, they can do that now. 

Maybe he wants to see how interim president Tommy Sheppard fares in his first draft as the top executive. Maybe all of this, the draft and free agency process, is a test.

Maybe he plans to hire someone from outside the organization, but feels that installing them now wouldn't be good timing. Leonsis hasn't offered specifics in that regard.

At this point, it seems clear the best way to make this a productive offseason from a roster-building perspective is to promote Sheppard. He has been carrying out his vision and will do so through at least the start of free agency.

The Wizards won't have a ton of money to spend, but they will have some. Sheppard is going to be making the pitch and signing players to be part of the Wizards' future.

Someone else is just going to take it over after that? That doesn't make a ton of sense, unless Leonsis is okay with punting this offseason with his eyes on the bigger picture.

But also, consider the fact this isn't just a normal offseason. They aren't your typical team hitting the reset button. They have two All-Star players signed to large contracts, John Wall to a supermax deal and Bradley Beal to a max.

This offseason should be the start of laying the groundwork for life with Wall after his Achilles surgery. And if they have any hope of signing Beal to another contract, they need to show some signs of progress.

Late in the regular season, Beal was asked whether he would sign an extension with the Wizards and he said: "I wanna be able to know that we're going in the right direction in the future."

Beal said that in the context of a potential supermax contract worth approximately $194 million over four years. Now they can only offer him a smaller deal worth about $111 million over three years.

ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reported on Tuesday the Wizards' intention to offer Beal the $111 million contract this summer. But if he wasn't a guarantee to accept the larger deal, then we know how he feels about the lesser one.

Beal has expressed his loyalty to the Wizards in numerous, sometimes-extreme ways. He has said everything from wanting to retire in a Wizards jersey to wanting to die in a Wizards jersey. He told NBC Sports Washington in February he wouldn't request a trade.

But he wasn't blowing smoke about wanting to see the team improve. Every indication from those familiar with his plans suggests he meant what he said. He is entering his eighth season and has already made plenty of money. He wants to win.

With that in mind, they can't really afford to botch this offseason. And if they have hopes of signing him long-term, they probably can't tear everything down around him for a rebuild. 

That makes the patience Leonsis is showing so interesting. There are still ways to ultimately get this process right. But the longer they wait, the more they will potentially sacrifice.

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