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On the fourth anniversary of his massive contract, a look at Chris Davis' struggles

On the fourth anniversary of his massive contract, a look at Chris Davis' struggles

From 2012 to 2015, Chris Davis was one of the most feared sluggers in baseball.

He led the American League in home runs twice, won a Silver Slugger and finished third in MVP voting in 2013. His production earned him a massive seven-year, $161 million contract extension, and today, on the four-year anniversary of the agreement things have tailed off quite a bit. 

"He's been struggling now for years," Orioles GM Mike Elias said at the Winter Meetings. "There are a lot of reasons for that and we continue to look into it but the reality is, he is under contract and it's something not to take lightly, and because of that we're going to be focused on getting the most out of him that we can. But it's a very frustrating situation for him and for us."

In the 617 games before his extension, Davis hit .257 with 161 home runs, 425 RBI and 788 strikeouts.

Since signing his deal, Davis has hit .198 with 92 home runs, 230 RBI and 745 strikeouts in 518 games. 

The Orioles have finished fifth in the AL East three out of the four seasons following Davis' contract, and while it's hard to imagine things getting worse, the Orioles still have his salary on the books for another three years. 

Maybe Davis has an extra gear in him to spark a career-revival as he enters his age-34 season. That would certainly help the Orioles get back to relevancy, but after two straight seasons of hitting below .200, it's hard to expect much from Davis moving forward. 

But hey, at least he's using his money for good. In early November, Davis and his wife donated a record $3 million to UMD Children's Hospital to help the hospital expand. 

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Chris Davis briefly considered retirement over the offseason

Chris Davis briefly considered retirement over the offseason

Chris Davis has three years left on his seven-year, $161 million contract. And he nearly walked away from it.

According to multiple reporters in Sarasota, Florida for the Orioles' first team workout of the spring, Davis admitted he considered walking away from baseball after another rough season. 

Davis, 33, slashed .179/.276/.326 last season with 36 RBIs and 12 home runs — the lowest totals of his career in a season in which he played at least 100 games.

After signing his monster contract in 2016, Davis’ play has fallen significantly. In those four years, he’s slashed .198/.294/.385 and struck out 745 times in 2,063 plate appearances. 

With the Orioles in the midst of a rebuild, there will soon be younger talent looking to take over Davis’ spot at first base. The first player in that wave will be Ryan Mountcastle, who last season in Triple-A Norfolk earned International League Most Valuable Player after a season where he slashed .312/.344/.527 and had 25 home runs and an .871 OPS. 

Davis also told reporters that if his play doesn’t improve, he’ll have the same conversation with his wife after the 2020 season. 

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Adam Jones doesn't buy Carlos Correa's defense of Jose Altuve

Adam Jones doesn't buy Carlos Correa's defense of Jose Altuve

In an attempt to defend Jose Altuve from suspicion into why the Astros star didn't want his jersey removed after his walk-off home run in this year's ALCS, Carlos Correa may have created another storm surrounding Houston's sign-stealing scandal. 

The Astros have been under siege at the beginning of spring training. Questions about them cheating in 2017 and even beyond that season have been coming in fast, and opposing players haven't held anything back either. 

In an interview with The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal, Correa went to bat for his team, ripping Cody Bellinger for accusing Houston of cheating from 2017 to 2019 and claiming the Astros fully deserve the World Series title they won despite flat out cheating. 

Then there are the buzzers. While the league has stated it found no evidence of the Astros using buzzers to signal pitches to batters at any point, many players aren't convinced because of Altuve's refusal to let his teammates take his jersey off following his home run against the Yankees. 

RELATED: ROB MANFRED'S ATTEMPT TO QUELL PR MESS DID NOT GO WELL

Correa claimed one of the reasons, along with Altuve's wife not wanting her husband's jersey ripped off, was an unfinished tattoo that didn't look to great. 

"So when he’s running from third base to home plate, I’m the guy up front," Correa told Rosenthal. "The first one waiting for him. He’s like, 'Don’t take my shirt off.' The second reason — he doesn’t want me to talk about this, but I’m going to say it, is because he’s got an unfinished tattoo on his collarbone that honestly looked terrible. It was a bad tattoo, and he didn’t want nobody to see it. He didn’t want to show it at all."

You can count former Orioles outfielder Adam Jones as one of many who don't buy that story. 

As bad as the Astros most likely want to move on from all of this, it's hard to see the snarky comments and the vitriol going away anytime soon.

RELATED: DUSTY BAKER WANTS MLB TO STOP PREMEDIATED RETALIATION ON ASTROS PLAYERS

And if Correa's story ends up to be false and it's deemed the Astros did in fact use buzzers? Oh boy. 

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