Other Sports

UPDATE: Rockville swimmer Jack Conger detained in Rio, group admits fabricating robbery story

UPDATE: Rockville swimmer Jack Conger detained in Rio, group admits fabricating robbery story

UPDATED 8/18/16 1:05 p.m.

A local swimmer has been caught up in the Rio police investigation into whether Ryan Lochte was robbed at gunpoint during the Olympic Games. 

Jack Conger – from Rockville, Md. – was one of three members of the U.S. swim team accompanying Lochte when the alleged holdup occurred. The others were Gunnar Bentz and James Feigen. 

Only Lochte and Feigen originally spoke to police about the incident, which has since prompted an investigation into whether the swimmers fabricated their story, a crime in itself. 

On Wednesday a Rio judge ordered that Lochte's and Feigen's passports be confiscated, but Lochte had already returned to the U.S. and Feigen's whereabouts were unknown. 

Brazilian police discovered that Feigen had checked in online for a flight out of Rio Wednesday, but did not show up for his plane. Conger and Bentz, meanwhile, had boarded their flight, but were removed by police for questioning.

The U.S. Olympic Committee provided this update Thursday morning: 

The three U.S. Olympic swimmers (Gunnar Bentz, Jack Conger and James Feigen) are cooperating with authorities and in the process of scheduling a time and place today to provide further statements to the Brazilian authorities. All are represented by counsel and being appropriately supported by the USOC and the U.S. Consulate in Rio.

Evolving Story

Though the initial inquiry focused on the alleged robbery, the Rio police investigation turned on the American swimmers as authorities could find no evidence to support their claims.

Conflicting and changing accounts from that evening first raised suspicion. Here's a quick timeline of events:

Aug. 14:

• News broke of the alleged robbery when Lochte's mother, Ileana, reported to the press that her son and his companions were robbed when men with guns stopped their taxi and demanded their wallets.

• Later that day, Lochte himself told NBC that the assailants presented a police badge and that one cocked a gun and held it to his forehead. 

Aug. 16:

• Lochte arrived back in the U.S. as originally scheduled. He said the American swimmers did not report the incident to police or Olympic officials out of fear that they had broken USOC rules and could get in trouble.

• Meanwhile back in Rio, police said that Lochte's and Feigen's statements about the events were inconsistent and vague on key details, possibly because they were drunk. 

Aug. 17:

• British paper The Daily Mail published what it claims was security footage of the U.S. swimmers arriving back at the Olympic Village after the incident. Video showed the four joking around with each other and in possession of valuables like watches.

• Brazilian Judge Keyla Blanc De Cnop issued the order to seize Lochte's and Feigen's passports, citing the suspiciously carefree behavior in the video as part of her judgment. She also revealed that Lochte said there was one robber in his statement to police, while Feigen said there were multiple. The men also reportedly were unable to say what time or where the robbery occurred.  

• Police arrived at the Olympic Village to confiscate the passports, but found that Lochte was already in the U.S. and the rest of the swimmers has moved out. That night, Conger and Bentz were removed from their flights. Feigen's whereabouts remained unknown.

• Speaking by phone to NBC's Matt Lauer, Lochte insisted that he did not and would not fabricate such a story. Several details changed in his latest retelling, including that the robbery occurred after the group's taxi had stopped to use a gas station bathroom (not that their taxi was stopped by the suspects), and that the gun was aimed near him (not held to his forehead). 

Aug. 18:

• USOC's statement said Feigen, Conger and Bentz had legal counsel and support of the U.S. Consulate. The three planed to meet with Brazilian authorities for questioning today. 

• ABC News reported that police sources recovered surveillance video from the gas station that night. It showed one swimmer "breaking down the door to the bathroom at the gas station and fighting with a security guard." 

• Another police source told the Associated Press that the swimmers invented the robbery story to conceal the confrontation at the gas station. The source said that one swimmer tried and failed to open the bathroom door, prompting his companions to push on the door and break it. A security guard with a gun then confronted the group, but did not draw his weapon or aim it at anyone. The gas station manager arrived on the scene, and with translation help from another customer, demanded that the Americans pay for the broken door. The swimmers gave him an undetermined amount of money and left. Lochte then told his mother the robbery story, and she relayed it to the media. 

• A worker from the gas station in question came forward with another variation of the night's events. 

• Around noon Thursday, ESPN reported that Lochte's three teammates admitted that the robbery story was false. 

Legal Consequences

According to Sports Illustrated legal analyst Michael McCann, filing a false police report is against the law in Brazil as it is in the U.S. A conviction of the crime can carry a six-month jail sentence or fine, but the Brazilian judicial system would have to determine that the swimmers knowingly lied, as opposed to confused the story after drinking heavily. 

The U.S. and Brazil have an extradition treaty, but it only applies to certain serious crimes, not offenses like filing a false police report. Lochte will almost certainly not be extradited. 

Conger, Bentz and Feigen could be detained in Brazil for an extended time as authorities conduct interviews and determine charges. If charged with filing a false police report or obstruction of justice, the Americans may be able to post bail provided that they do not leave the country. 

The U.S. State Department will almost certainly get involved in the case to expedite a resolution and ensure the swimmers are treated fairly. It's possible that diplomacy, rather than the legal system, will resolve this situation. 

Conger a Montgomery County Kid

As of 1:00 p.m., local news trucks and police vehicles have gathered in front of Conger's home in the Flower Valley neighborhood of Rockville. 

Conger swam locally for Rockville-Montgomery Swim Club and Our Lady of Good Counsel High School in Olney, Md. He went on to swim collegiately for University of Texas. 

While representing Good Counsel at the Metros in 2013, Conger posted a 4:13.87 time in the 500-yard freestyle, obliterating a 30-year-old National High School record by 3 full seconds. 

The 21-year-old finished in the top four of three events at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials. His third-place in the 200-meter freestyle earned him a spot on the Olympic roster. 

Once in Rio, Conger won a gold medal as part of the 800-meter freestyle relay team.

Additional information sourced from CNN and SwimSwam.com. 

5 things to know about Katie Ledecky before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

5 things to know about Katie Ledecky before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

At the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Katie Ledecky established herself as the new face of USA Swimming at 18 years old. 

Now she's back following a successful college career at Stanford and is poised to dominate another Olympic games this summer in Tokyo, Japan. 

In preparation for the games, here are five things you'll want to know about the Washington, D.C. native before she starts lapping her competitors in the pool. 

The youngest US Olympian at the 2012 games

While she dominated in 2016, Ledecky first broke out in 2012 at the London Games. She qualified as a 15-year-old and was the youngest American participant in London that year. 

As if making it to the Olympics at 15 wasn't impressive enough, Ledecky shocked the world when she won the 800m freestyle by more than four seconds and broke Janet Evans' American record set in 1989. 

The performance earned herself the 2012 Best Female Performance of the Year and Breakout Performance of the Year at the Golden Goggle Awards. 

DMV roots

Ledecky was born in Washington, D.C. in March of 1997 and attended school in Bethesda, MD. She graduated from Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart in 2015 and twice set the American and US Open record in the 500-yard freestyle and set the national high school record in the 200-yard freestyle twice as well. 

Oh, and she grew up a huge Capitals fan.

Ledecky has a "slam" named after her

From 2014 to 2015, Ledecky established herself as the best women's swimmer in the world. In back-to-back years, she swept the 200, 400, 800 and 1500m freestyle at the Pan Pacific Championships in 2014 and the 2015 World Championships. 

Sweeping all four events is now called the "Ledecky Slam." Ledecky wasn't able to complete her slam in the 2016 games, but that's only because the 1500m freestyle wasn't on the docket.

The Tokyo games have added the event, so Ledecky can officially go for her patented slam on the biggest stage. 

2016 dominance

When the 2016 Olympics rolled around, Ledecky was poised to take home multiple gold medals. 

She swept every individual competition she was in, claiming gold in the 200, 400 and 800m freestyle. She also set world records in the 400 and 800m. 

In the team events, Ledecky came away with a gold medal in the 4x200m freestyle relay and a silver in the 4x100m freestyle relay despite setting a new American record. 

Events Ledecky will compete in this summer

As we've stated before, the 1500m meter freestyle is a new addition at this year's Olympic games, and Ledecky plans to swim in it. She'll also compete in the three other freestyle events included in the Ledecky Slam. 

She will also compete in the freestyle relays for the U.S.

Women's swimming events will begin on July 25 in Tokyo and will run through August 5. 

CLICK HERE TO READ ABOUT US OLYMPIC WRESTLER KYLE SNYDER.

5 things to know about Olympic wrestler Kyle Snyder ahead of Tokyo 2020

5 things to know about Olympic wrestler Kyle Snyder ahead of Tokyo 2020

You can't describe United States Olympic wrestling without bringing up the name Kyle Snyder.

The 24-year-old is already a legend in the sport. He captured his first Olympic gold medal in 2016 while he was still college, and is a multiple-time high school and NCAA Division I champion.

Snyder looks to defend his gold medal from four years ago when he returns to the Olympics this summer in Tokyo.

Here are five things to know about Snyder.

1. Snyder was 179-0 in high school.

Yes, you read that right. 

Snyder attended Our Lady of Good Counsel High School in Olney, Md., competing in the most competitive athletic conference in the area. His domination was incredible. 

He was a winner of three Prep championships, and according to the Washington Post, only allowed one takedown over his three years. 

Snyder did not wrestle his senior year as he chose to train at the United States Olympic Training Center and competing in Junior World Championships.

2. At Ohio State, Snyder finished 75-5 with only one loss his final three seasons.

Snyder's dominance in high school directly translated to the college ranks. As a true freshman, Snyder finished 30-4, finishing runner-up to Iowa State's Kyven Gadson, who was four years older than him. The Buckeyes won the NCAA Division I team championship that season.

Over the next three years, Snyder went 45-1. He is a three-time NCAA Division I national champion.

3. Snyder won three of wrestling's most prestigious events before his 21st birthday.

At age 19, Snyder became the United States' youngest World Champion ever, taking home first place in the 2015 World Wrestling Championships. There, he defeated the reigning world champion, Russia’s Abdusalam Gadisov. 

Just weeks after that, Snyder returned to Ohio State and captured his first individual NCAA title, defeating N.C. State's Nickolos Gwiazdowski. 

He concluded his remarkable run that summer when he took home the gold at the 2016 Olympics in Rio for the 97 kg. weight class.

4. President Trump appointed Snyder to the Council on Sports, Fitness, and Nutrition in 2018.

Snyder was one of 20 members selected by the president to serve on the council.

Other notable names include former Yankees star Johnny Damon and New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick.

Mariano Rivera, Herschel Walker and Misty May-Treanor were named co-chairs of the Council.

5. Snyder left Ohio State to train with Nittany Lion Wrestling Club at Penn State this past October.

The move shocked many in the wrestling world.

Snyder, who was apparently unhappy with his third-place finish in September's World Wrestling Championships, decided to leave the program for one of its rivals.

The 2020 Olympics will be a good measure if the move paid off or not.