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Wimbledon Championships canceled due to coronavirus for the first time since World War II

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Wimbledon Championships canceled due to coronavirus for the first time since World War II

Wimbledon was canceled on Wednesday because of the coronavirus pandemic, the first time since World War II that the oldest Grand Slam tennis tournament won't be played.

The All England Club announced after an emergency meeting that the event it refers to simply as The Championships is being scrapped for 2020.

Wimbledon was scheduled to be played on the club's grass courts on the outskirts of London from June 29 to July 12.

Instead, the next edition of the tournament will be June 28 to July 11, 2021.

The tournament was first held in 1877 and has been contested every year since, with the exception of two stretches: from 1915-18 because of World War I, and from 1940-45 because of World War II.

It now joins the growing list of sports events scrapped completely in 2020 because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

That includes the Tokyo Olympics - which have been pushed back 12 months - and the NCAA men's and women's college basketball tournaments.

Wimbledon is the first major tennis championship completely wiped out this year because of the coronavirus. The start of the French Open was postponed from late May to late September.

As of now, the U.S. Open is still scheduled to be played in New York from Aug. 31 to Sept. 13.

Wizards participate in voluntary workouts, Brooks Koepka has competition

Wizards participate in voluntary workouts, Brooks Koepka has competition

First up in our look around the sports world, while following guidelines set by the NBA the Washington Wizards are back at the MedStar Performance Center participating in voluntary workouts, gearing up for the restart of the NBA season.

Next up, just when you thought you were going to hit a walk-off homer against your family, your big brother absolutely robs you from the moment! That’s exactly what happened to this little sister, she was so close!

Finally, meet 5-year-old Preston, in a pair of Jordan 5s he drove this golf ball into next week! Brooks Koepka took notice and liked the post on Instagram but he better watch out, Preston's coming for his job.

Former boxing champ Floyd Mayweather to pay for George Floyd's funeral

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Former boxing champ Floyd Mayweather to pay for George Floyd's funeral

Former boxing champion Floyd Mayweather has offered to pay for George Floyd’s funeral and memorial services, and the family has accepted the offer.

Mayweather personally has been in touch with the family, according to Leonard Ellerbe, the CEO of Mayweather Promotions. He will handle costs for the funeral on June 9 in Floyd’s hometown of Houston, as well as other expenses.

Floyd, a black man, died May 25 after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck while Floyd was handcuffed and saying that he couldn’t breathe. His death sparked protests in Minneapolis and around the country, some of which became violent.

TMZ originally reported Mayweather’s offer, and said he will also pay for services in Minnesota and North Carolina.

“He’ll probably get mad at me for saying that, but yes, he is definitely paying for the funeral,” Ellerbe told ESPN.com on Monday.

Mayweather, who lives in Las Vegas, has not met the Floyd family.

Mayweather, who retired undefeated after 50 fights, winning five division titles, also paid for the funeral of an opponent. Mayweather won his first world championship when he stopped Genaro Hernandez for the WBC super featherweight title in 1998. Hernandez died 13 years later of cancer, and Mayweather handled funeral expenses.

Mayweather is considered one of the best boxers of his generation. Among the champion boxers he defeated before retiring in 2017, are Manny Pacquiao, Canelo Alvarez, Oscar de la Hoya and Miguel Cotto.