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Pa. prosecutor: Steroids found in Reid's room

Pa. prosecutor: Steroids found in Reid's room

EASTON, Pa. (AP) An investigation into the fatal heroin overdose of Garrett Reid, the oldest son of Philadelphia Eagles coach Andy Reid, revealed there were steroids in his room the day he died, a Pennsylvania prosecutor said Monday.

Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli said that anabolic steroids were found in the room where Garrett Reid was staying when he overdosed on heroin Aug. 5 during Eagles training camp. Reid was helping the team's strength and conditioning coach at the time of his death.

Morganelli said there was no evidence that Reid was giving the steroids to any Eagles players. He said that investigators could not determine if the drugs were for Reid's own use or for distribution.

The prosecutor showed little appetite for a deeper probe, saying his investigation was focused on the circumstances surrounding Reid's death at age 29.

``The issue of steroids, it's an illegal substance in Pennsylvania law. It has probably more significance in the sports world. But since it did not appear to be related to his death, we're not pursuing that any further,'' Morganelli said.

Eagles Chairman Jeffrey Lurie called the news of the steroids disappointing, and noted that neither the organization nor the players were aware of or involved with anything related to the banned substances.

``It's clear the conduct in which he apparently engaged runs counter to the values and principles mandated for everyone associated with our organization. We have spoken with the league office and have pledged our full cooperation with their requests should there be any,'' Lurie said.

``While we remained saddened by the tragic end of a young man's life and know how hard this must be for the entire Reid family, we are extremely confident that Garrett's actions were unknown to those around him and did not involve our football team.''

Lehigh University police were called to Reid's dorm room at Lehigh University in Bethlehem around 7:20 a.m. on Aug. 5, arriving after Eagles team physician Dr. Omar Elkhamra had tried to revive him with a defibrillator.

Investigators searching his room found a used syringe and spoon, along with a gym bag filled with dozens of syringes and needles, many of them unopened, as well as 19 vials of an unknown liquid.

Testing revealed the vials contained four types of anabolic steroids, Morganelli said.

But he said he did not have any evidence that Reid was distributing steroids to players.

Asked how aggressively his office and Lehigh University's police department pursued the question, Morganelli said: ``Lots of interviews were conducted by the police. And I can't go into all of them, but all I can say is that we could not provide any evidence or substantiate that anybody in the Eagles organization was involved in this, or whether or not this was for his personal use. It was just undetermined.''

He acknowledged the quantity found could have been intended for distribution, ``but what I'm saying is I have no evidence of that, that there was any distribution by Mr. Reid, either here or anywhere else.''

The prosecutor said he had not been in touch either with the NFL or the Eagles organization.

In a statement, Andy Reid said he was ``confident that my son's decisions did not affect our football team in any way.''

``I cannot apologize enough for any adverse appearances that my son's actions may have for an organization and a community that has been nothing but supportive of our family,'' the Eagles coach said.

Northampton County Coroner Zachary Lysek said Monday that testing is under way to determine if Reid had steroids in his system at the time of his death.

It was Lysek who determined previously that Reid succumbed to an accidental overdose of heroin. After the coroner announced his findings in October, investigators focused on learning who had supplied him with the drug, combing through Reid's phone records to see who he was calling and texting before his death. But Morganelli said that probe ran into a dead end.

``It cannot be determined whether Mr. Reid obtained heroin here in the Lehigh Valley or brought it with him to training camp from elsewhere,'' Morganelli said, adding that Lehigh University police have closed the investigation.

Reid seemed to have rebounded from a long struggle with drug abuse.

He was sentenced to nearly two years in prison for a 2007 high-speed car crash that injured another driver. Police said Reid was high on heroin, and they found the drug and more than 200 pills in his car.

More recently, exercise and training had become his passion and he aspired to make it a career. At the time of his death, he had been helping strength and conditioning coach Barry Rubin. But an autopsy revealed his body showed signs of chronic drug use.

Reid's younger brother, Britt, has also struggled with drug use and was arrested on the same day as Garrett in 2007 after a road-rage incident. Police discovered weapons and drugs in Britt Reid's vehicle. He now works as a graduate assistant coach at Temple.

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WATCH: Rui Hachimura punishing Spurs interior defense with dunk and two layups

WATCH: Rui Hachimura punishing Spurs interior defense with dunk and two layups

As Rui Hachimura continues to grow and take his lumps at the NBA level, one important point of development for the Wizards' rookie will be finishing through contact at the rim. 

The Wizards play the Hornets on Friday at 7 p.m. EST on NBC Sports Washington.

On Wednesday night against the Spurs, Hachimura hit a nice hook shot over LaMarcus Aldridge and then finished through traffic after attacking a closeout a few plays later. He entered the game shooting nearly 70 percent at the rim, a major reason why he's one of the top-scoring rookies this season. 

Then at the end of the first half, Isaiah Thomas found Hachimura on a back-door cut for the easy slam. Well-timed cuts are a great source of points for young players. 

After the break, the ninth-overall pick flashed a little finesse at the rim for another pretty finish. 

His three-point shooting will have to improve at some point down the line and learning better positioning as a defender is something every rookie has to go through. 

Both of those skills can be improved in the practice gym or in the film room. Finishing at the basket through contact is learned by repetition in-game, so it's a promising sign to see Hachimura take the ball to the rim. 

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When Gregg Popovich thinks the NBA will be ready for a female head coach

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When Gregg Popovich thinks the NBA will be ready for a female head coach

WASHINGTON -- The Wizards hosting the Spurs on Wednesday night brought together two of the 11 NBA teams that currently employ a female assistant coach. The Wizards have Kristi Toliver on their bench and the Spurs have Becky Hammon.

That confluence prompted a question to San Antonio head coach Gregg Popovich on the future of women in the NBA coaching ranks and whether a head coaching hire could happen sometime soon. 

The Wizards play the Hornets on Friday at 7 p.m. EST on NBC Sports Washington.

Though it has been five years since he hired Hammon as the first full-time female assistant coach in league history, Popovich is uncertain on exactly when a team will make the leap to hiring a woman to run their operation.

"That depends on people and organizations," he said. 

"It's a process and it doesn't happen quickly. But I think the more women there are [in the game] and as it becomes more commonplace and more the rule, it will then depend on an organization realizing there are women that can do this. Every woman can't, every man can't. But the point is there gotta be enough to choose from and it's gotta be pretty commonplace before I think somebody's gonna pull the trigger."

Popovich believes it will happen, he's just not sure when. The Wizards hiring Toliver last summer was another step in that direction and he believes she and others are showing the basketball world what they are capable of.

"There's no difference between a woman who knows the game and a man who knows the game. It's just another prejudice that probably has to be overcome just like a lot of other prejudices in the world have become less and less as people paid attention to them," Popovich said.

Hammon made the news over the weekend when Popovich was ejected from the Spurs' loss to the Kings and a committee of assistants coached the rest of the game. Popovich was asked why he didn't appoint Hammon to serve in the role for the rest of the game and he told reporters he was "not here to make history." 

Still, though there has never been a female head coach in any of the four major U.S. sports, it seems like the NBA is by far the closest with people like Hammon and Tolliver already knocking on the door.

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