Redskins

Panthers hire Giants' David Gettleman as new GM

Panthers hire Giants' David Gettleman as new GM

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) The Carolina Panthers hired New York Giants senior pro personnel analyst David Gettleman as their new general manager to end their lengthy search to fill the position.

The team announced the decision Wednesday afternoon after interviewing Gettleman earlier in the day.

Gettleman, 61, spent 13 seasons with the Giants as their director of pro personnel prior to taking over last year as the senior pro personnel analyst.

He's been a part of six Super Bowl teams, including three championship squads. He was with Buffalo in 1990 and 1991, Denver in 1997 and the Giants in 2000, 2007 and 2011. The '97 Broncos and the `07 and `11 Giants won championships.

Gettleman replaces longtime Panthers GM Marty Hurney, who was fired after Carolina's 1-5 start.

``I was very impressed with Dave's experience and think he will be a very good fit for our organization,'' Panthers owner Jerry Richardson said in a statement. ``He has an extensive background in personnel and comes from an organization in the New York Giants that I hold in high regard and he played an instrumental role in their success.''

Gettleman is expected to be introduced in a press conference next week, according to team spokesman Charlie Dayton.

``I am honored and thrilled to have the opportunity to work in the Panthers organization,'' Gettleman said in a release. ``It is similar to the Giants organization in which I have had the privilege of working the last 15 years and has a lot of pieces in place for success. I am excited about getting started.''

The Panthers hired former Giants GM Ernie Accorsi as the lead consultant in the search.

A person familiar with the situation said the Panthers also interviewed Tennessee Titans vice president of player personnel Lake Dawson on Wednesday. The person said the Panthers Tuesday interviewed Giants director of college scouting Marc Ross and Montreal Alouettes general manager Jim Popp for the position. The person spoke to The Associated Press Wednesday on condition of anonymity because the Panthers did not announce who they interviewed for the position.

``Dave is extremely qualified to be the general manager of the Panthers and will do a terrific job,'' Giants GM Jerry Reese said. ``I'm thankful for all of his hard work and friendship while here with the Giants. The Panthers interviewed two of the top personnel executives in the NFL in Dave Gettleman and Marc Ross, and couldn't go wrong either way, in my humble opinion.''

Giants co-owner John Mara said, ``I have mixed emotions about this. Dave certainly deserves to be a general manager, but I am very sorry to lose him. He has been instrumental to the success we have had.''

Gettleman will have his work cut out for him in Carolina.

He inherits a team that hasn't made the playoffs since 2008 and hasn't won a playoff game since 2005. The Panthers are already $16 million over the projected 2013 NFL salary cap, meaning he likely won't be able to add many big names in free agency.

Still, Gettleman has experienced success in the NFL.

Along with the six Super Bowls, he's been associated with 13 playoff teams during in his NFL career which has spanned more than 25 years.

He entered the NFL in 1986 as a scouting department intern for the Buffalo Bills. He became a full-time scout for Buffalo after the 1987 draft.

Following a year as an area scout, Gettleman was assigned as the Bills' representative to the BLESTO scouting combine and continued in that capacity through the 1992 draft as the Northeast area scout.

Former Bills GM Bill Polian first lured Gettleman to Buffalo.

At the time Gettleman was a head football coach at Kingston (N.Y.) High School.

Polian said Gettleman would lock himself in his office for hours, just watching tape and trying to find up and coming players who might have slipped through the cracks. He said that type of work ethic has been instrumental in his rise to the top.

``He's bright and extremely hard working and loves the game,'' Polian said. ``He really cares about the people he works with and he's as sound of a football man as you can find.''

Although Gettleman is quite familiar working with Super Bowl teams, Polian said he's never been one to seek the spotlight.

``The Giants have been tremendously successful, but he's never one that beats his own drum,'' said Polian, who spent three seasons as Carolina's GM from 1995-97. ``He's very good at what he does and he's been at it a long time. He is as well prepared for (a GM position) as anyone that has been hired in recent years.''

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The Kerrigans are having a baby and, WOW, this is all so very exciting

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@kerrigan91

The Kerrigans are having a baby and, WOW, this is all so very exciting

The Kerrigan family is about to make a big-time addition to its roster.

Ryan and his wife, Jessica, already have two very, VERY, very, very cute bulldogs in their household. 

But on Tuesday, the two announced in separate Instagram posts that Jessica is 18 weeks pregnant and that a third human Kerrigan will arrive in 2019.

"Can I eat dis sign aftur da picturr iz over?" George the bulldog said when reached for comment on the news.

"How did dey gett such a smawl jerzey for da baby alreddy?" Franklin the other bulldog added.

This is all very wonderful.

Come next March, the world is about to get a little precious-er.

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The Caps are a bad faceoff team, here’s what they’re doing about it

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USA Today Sports

The Caps are a bad faceoff team, here’s what they’re doing about it

Tuesday’s practice was a lot like every other for the Caps until the end. After working on the power play, the team gathered at one end of the ice and began working on faceoffs. It was not just the centers, but wingers and defensemen alike got into the action with every win celebrated by loud cheers from teammates.

It should could as no surprise to see faceoffs as a point of emphasis for Washington considering just how much the team has struggled with them in the early season. The Caps rank 30th in the league in faceoff win percentage at only 43.8-percent.

“Yeah, there's little details that can help our game,” Lars Eller told reporters after practice. “The more you have the puck, easier the game is gonna be for you. We have a little more time in between games than usual during the season here, so we have the time to work on something like that, which can be little things that makes the difference.”

The team as a whole watched video on faceoffs prior to practice and then worked as a five-man unit during the drill. The main point of emphasis head coach Todd Reirden wanted to drill into his players was that faceoffs are not simply the responsibility of the centers alone.

“The days of it just being center vs. center and a clean draw being won back are a rarity now so it's important to have all five guys helping, something we watched video on earlier today,” Reirden said.

“You ask any centerman if they have a good group of wingers that can help them out on draws, that makes a huge difference,” Nic Dowd said. “I've been lucky, I have [Devante Smith-Pelly] on my right and I'm a righty so I win all my draws my backhand side so a lot of pucks go his way and he wins a lot of draws for me. That's huge. You have a guy that's sitting over there that's sleeping, you could go easily from five wins to five losses and then that's your night. It makes a big difference.”

Faceoffs were always going to be more of a struggle for the Caps this season with the departure of Jay Beagle who was, by far, the team’s best faceoff man for several years. Whenever the team needed a big draw, Beagle was the player relied upon to win it. With him gone, it is no surprise to see the team struggle.

But the Caps don’t like the idea of keeping possession off a draw just 43.8-percent of the time.

“It's essentially like the ref is creating a 50-50 puck and you snap it back, you get possession, now you're forechecking and it makes a huge difference,” Dowd said. “You play against those top lines, they want to be in the O-zone. Well, if you lose the draw, now you're playing D-zone, you win the draw now you're playing O-zone. So effectively, you've shut down their shift.”

There is a school of thought suggesting that perhaps the importance of winning faceoffs is overrated and a team’s faceoff win percentage is not overly important. Eller himself admitted as much to reporters.

What no one can argue, however, is that while some faceoffs may not matter all that much, there are some that are hugely important in a game. The Caps recognize that. For them, being a strong faceoff team is not necessarily about improving the team’s win percentage, but more about being able to win those critical draws.

“It's something that for the most part the players understand and a neutral zone faceoff with 14 minutes to go in the first period is not nearly as important as one that's 5-on-6 at the end of the game,” Reirden said. “We all know that. It's important to put the right people on those situations and give them the best chance to have success.”

“A center ice draw, I could see where guys could make the argument, well you lose it you still will play hockey and stuff could still happen,” Dowd said. “But I think the game is such a possession game now that any opportunity you can win a 50-50 puck whether that's a faceoff or a board battle, it makes a huge difference.”

 

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