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Raiders fire OC, 3 other assistants

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Raiders fire OC, 3 other assistants

ALAMEDA, Calif. (AP) The first year of the new regime in Oakland ended in similar fashion to the previous nine disappointing seasons for the Raiders, with no playoff berth and changes on the coaching staff.

Coach Dennis Allen fired offensive coordinator Greg Knapp, special teams coordinator Steve Hoffman, offensive line coach Frank Pollack and linebackers coach Johnny Holland as he began overhauling a staff he put together after being hired less than a year ago.

Allen and first-year general manager Reggie McKenzie had a long-range view after taking over an organization that had been run for nearly a half-century by late owner Al Davis.

``I'm not in this for a one-year deal,'' Allen said. ``I'm in this long-term. I'm in this to build this thing the right way. And I'm excited about looking forward to the future and where this organization is going to go.''

But Allen felt some changes to his staff were necessarily after one season in which Oakland's win total dropped from eight to four, the offense regressed and the defense allowed the most points for the franchise since 1961.

``Obviously, I believe in continuity,'' he said. ``I think that's the way you're able to sustain success in this league is through continuity. But I also know that at some point we're looking for the results and we have to have the results. This is a win-now business no matter how much patience we're looking for.''

Allen said the four changes announced Monday are the only coaches he plans to get rid of this offseason. For a change, the head coach will be coming back.

The Raiders made six coaching changes the previous nine seasons, including firing Tom Cable after an 8-8 record in 2010 and Hue Jackson after an 8-8 mark in 2011.

Allen said he didn't want to look back at his decision last offseason to overhaul an offensive system that had been successful for two years with Hue Jackson calling the plays.

Knapp implemented a West Coast system with a zone blocking scheme instead of the downfield passing, power running scheme Jackson employed. While Carson Palmer adjusted to the change and became the second Raiders quarterback ever to throw for 4,000 yards in a season, big-play running back Darren McFadden reverted to his early career struggles when he played in a similar system.

After averaging more than 5 yards per carry in each of the past two seasons under Jackson, McFadden averaged just 3.3 yards per carry this season - the lowest ever for a Raiders back with at least 150 carries in a season.

Without an effective running game the Raiders scored more than four fewer points a game than a year ago - a major part of their drop from eight wins the past two seasons to just four this year.

``I believe the zone scheme running scheme is a productive running scheme,'' Allen said. ``Obviously, we didn't have the success that we needed to have and there were a lot of factors that contributed into that. I'm not tied to a specific system. I'm tied to trying to find out what our players can do really well and try to put them in those positions to give them a chance to have success. I'm looking for production and execution.''

Allen said he wants to find the right coordinator rather than pick a certain system. He said he would talk to senior offensive assistant Al Saunders, who was coordinator in 2011 under Jackson.

Allen came in talking about changing the culture of a team that had grown so used to losing in the latter years under Davis. One of the few bright spots came in the reduction of penalties after Oakland set an NFL record with 163 in 2011 under Jackson.

Oakland's 108 penalties were the fewest for the franchise since it had 107 in 2001 in the final season under coach Jon Gruden.

Allen didn't have as much success fixing the defense as the Raiders allowed 443 points and 27.7 points per game - the most for the team since its second season in 1961.

Middle linebacker Rolando McClain, the first-round pick in 2010, was suspended for two games for conduct detrimental to the team and then made inactive the past three games.

The Raiders had a revolving door at cornerback and got little production from their offseason acquisitions, releasing Ron Bartell and getting less than two games from Shawntae Spencer before a season-ending foot injury.

There figure to be plenty of personnel changes, especially on a defense where nine players who started games are potential unrestricted free agents.

While Oakland wants to bring back linebacker Philip Wheeler, others like Richard Seymour, Matt Giordano, Mike Mitchell and Matt Shaughnessy could have new homes next season as the Raiders try to shore up their roster.

``This is a players game,'' Allen said. ``Players make plays and the best teams are able at some point in time to hand the keys to the car over to the players and they're able to run the program the way it needs to be run. We're not at that point yet but we're developing that every day.''

NOTES: Allen said he expects Palmer to make a full recovery from cracked ribs and a bruised lung that sidelined him from the finale and should be ready to participate in minicamp next spring. ... Allen was pleased with Terrelle Pryor's play in the season finale when he threw two TD passes and ran for a third score. ``I thought he did a nice job in the red zone, and I think his athleticism brings an extra dimension that makes it difficult on defenses down there. So, yeah, I think his athleticism can help us in the red zone,'' Allen said.

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Wizards 2018-19 end of season grades: Bradley Beal

Wizards 2018-19 end of season grades: Bradley Beal

Now that the dust has settled for the 2018-19 Wizards season, it's time to review the roster and hand out individual grades...

Who: Bradley Beal, shooting guard

2018-19 stats: 36.9 mpg, 25.6 ppg, 5.5 apg, 5.0 rpg, 1.5 spg, 0.7 bpg, 2.7 tov, 47.5 FG%, 35.1 3P% (2.5/7.3), 54.0 eFG%, 80.8 FT% (4.4/5.5), 113 ortg, 114 drtg

Best game: 1/13 vs. Raptors - 43 points, 15 assists, 10 rebounds, three steals, two blocks, 6-12 3PT

Grade: A+

Season review: One could argue that nobody deserves a higher grade in the Wizards organization for their 2018-19 season than Bradley Beal, who had by far the best individual year of any player on the team. He had high expectations coming into the season and exceeded them, taking the next step from an All-Star to a legitimate All-NBA candidate.

Beal also continued to represent the organization well in public. He spoke for the team after many difficult losses with poise and maturity. And he brought positive attention to the franchise for his charitable efforts, recently being named as a finalist for the league's community assist award.

Beal's on-court performance was a shining light amid a disastrous season overall for the team. He set career-highs in scoring, rebounds, assists, steals and free throw attempts. He played in all 82 games for the second straight season and never complained despite leading the NBA in minutes.

The most impressive part of Beal's season may be how he responded when John Wall went down due to injury. Wall last played on Dec. 26 and in the next 47 games, Beal averaged 27.2 points, 6.0 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.8 steals. 

Beal's final numbers put him in elite company. He became the first 25-5-5 player in Wizards/Bullets franchise history. He was one of only six players to reach that mark this season, a list that includes Giannis Antetokounmpo, LeBron James, James Harden, Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry.

Even as the season was winding down and the Wizards were well out of playoff contention, Beal gave an honest and consistent effort. That stood out in a year in which some of his teammates did not play hard and were called out by head coach Scott Brooks and team leaders for doing so. 

Now Beal, of course, had many reasons to keep giving 100 percent. With the numbers he has put up, he could make All-NBA in late May and, if he does, will qualify for a supermax contract. That could mean tens of millions more on his next deal, if he chooses to sign back with the Wizards.

As Beal looks ahead to this summer and next season, another question is how much better he can become. He took a significant step from the All-Star year he had in 2017-18. What if he makes another, similar leap?

Beal upped his scoring average by three points year-over-year. Another jump like that could put him in the MVP conversation, depending on how the Wizards finish in the standings.

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Trevor Rosenthal’s fate among key questions as Nationals stumble home

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Trevor Rosenthal’s fate among key questions as Nationals stumble home

Rolling back into town, things same as they ever were, the Nationals can take solace in their situation by looking across the division. Brutish, really, a bunch of teams labeled contenders which can’t assemble winning streaks or bullpen outs. The National League East is an ugly affair filled with teams barely playing winning baseball. Not one of the five has a record better than .500 across the last 10 games.

Which is good news for the Nationals. They left the District with hopes consecutive series against supposedly inferior teams would jumpstart this pothole-filled season. No such results. Losers of four of six against downtrodden Miami and suddenly vibing Colorado leaves Washington a game under .500 -- its home of a year-plus. The Nationals have been within one game of .500, either a game above or below, 95 times since the 2018 season began with a 4-0 sweep in Cincinnati. That’s the most in the majors by 22 games.

So, a week away did nothing to change the team’s record or problems. Trevor Rosenthal still can’t find the plate. Trea Turner still has not healed. The bullpen as a whole is still languishing. Anthony Rendon’s elbow bruise was enough to keep him out of the Colorado series but not on the 10-day injured list.

Rosenthal remains a conundrum. Another wild appearance in Colorado undermined the progress of his previous appearance. He hits batters, bats and backstops, none of which are the goal.

Washington has few options with him. Rosenthal is earning $7 million guaranteed this season. He has minor-league options, but his major-league service time means he would have to accept an assignment to the lower levels. The Nationals can’t just send him down. He also just spent a year-plus recovering from surgery in order to pitch in the major leagues. Try telling that person it’s time for the minor leagues. He currently can’t be trusted in any spot. But, he needs to pitch to fix his issues.

An argument to Rosenthal to accept a minor-league assignment could go like this: go down there, get right, come back to help us when that happens. Don’t think only about now. Think about the future, too. A $14-million club option is on the line for next season. The chance Washington takes that option is close to nil. So, Rosenthal needs to think about employment elsewhere. What’s happening now -- pitching sparingly with stomach-churning results -- is not working, and it’s not working for anyone.

Another looming question as spunky San Diego arrives for a three-game series, is Rendon’s status. He has not played since being hit by a pitch April 20 in Miami. He also is yet to make his way to the injured list. Which, presumably, means the Nationals expect Rendon to be available Friday night against the Padres. If not, he should have been placed on the injured list already, retroactive to Sunday.

Without Rendon, the Nationals received a sustained look at Victor Robles hitting second. The results were intriguing. Robles remains a dynamic athlete who is still learning to hit. Davey Martinez will have to decide whether he is a fit to hit second without Turner and with Rendon in the lineup. Putting Robles second would have a two-fold benefit: It moves Rendon to hitting third, which moves Juan Soto to fourth, giving further separation to the left-handed bats in the lineup (part of the original thought for hitting Turner second). It also simply provides Robles more at-bats.

However Martinez -- and the organization -- decide to act will not be made easier by the coming schedule. San Diego’s negative run differential suggests its 14-11 record is built on false underpinnings. However, it remains a competitive team. St. Louis -- the NL’s best team as of Thursday -- is next. Another drive to Philadelphia follows, then a trip to Milwaukee and four games in Los Angeles against the first-place Dodgers.

Washington has to figure out if Rosenthal will be making any of those journeys, where Robles will be hitting, and, most notably, how they can put together consecutive wins. Its longest winning streak is two games. Its longest losing streak is two games. The Nationals have never been more than one game over .500 or two games below this season. This is peak middling, and not what a $190 million payroll was dispatched to do.

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