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What Tom Brady’s expected move to the Buccaneers means for the Ravens

What Tom Brady’s expected move to the Buccaneers means for the Ravens

With Tom Brady’s expected move to the Buccaneers seemingly imminent, it appears that a historic era of Ravens football is over. 

The Buccaneers aren’t scheduled to play the Ravens until the 2022 season — a year that Brady would begin at 45-years-old. Should he play that long, the Ravens would face him yet another time in their storied rivalry. 

But if this is the end of the line for the Ravens and Brady in the regular season, it was one of the team’s best rivalries. 

The rivalry began in 2007 when the Ravens nearly ended the Patriots’ perfect regular season — with some controversy involved.

All-time, the Ravens have gone 4-8 against Brady, though they’ve gone 2-2 against him in the playoffs. Brady went 20-4 in the playoffs at home, and the Ravens gave him two of those losses. 

Historically, Brady played well against the Ravens in the regular season. He posted a 6-2 record and threw for 10 touchdowns, five interceptions and a completion percentage of 60 percent. In the playoffs, though, Brady had trouble dealing with the Ravens. 

He completed 58.8 percent of his passes and threw for six touchdowns and eight interceptions. He and the Patriots went 2-2 against the Ravens all-time in the playoffs — including a win in the 2012 AFC Championship Game where Brady threw for zero touchdowns and got the win regardless. 

Brady has publicly feuded with Terrell Suggs and shown great respect for both Ray Lewis and Ed Reed on the field. Brady once even wore his quarterback wristband labeled with the phrase, ‘find 20 on every play.’

While there were big moments and even more storied games, it appears that Brady’s time against the Ravens has come to an end. And if it’s officially over, the Ravens and Patriots rivalry with Brady at the helm won’t soon be forgotten.

That is, of course, unless the Ravens and Buccaneers meet each other in the Super Bowl. Then all bets are off.

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Ravens WR Willie Snead: ‘Can you imagine the fall with no football at all? I mean, I can’t’

Ravens WR Willie Snead: ‘Can you imagine the fall with no football at all? I mean, I can’t’

Willie Snead IV can’t imagine what fall would look like without football.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has forced the NFL to adjust its offseason schedule, each team around the league scrambled to make changes to its offseason programs. 

By all accounts, the Ravens have made things as easy as possible for players to make the transition in Owings Mills to remain socially distant. Their hope is to make playing actual games — still not a guarantee — as easy as possible.

Despite challenges in Major League Baseball, there’s not a lot of doubt from people around the league about whether a season can happen.

“I know basketball is going,” Snead said on a Zoom call with reporters Wednesday. “I know baseball is going right now. But, when football comes around, can you imagine the fall with no football at all? I mean, I can’t. So, it’s going to be an adjustment without fans, especially in training camp, but I know once we start rolling on Sundays, I know the whole environment in our nation is going to change.”

Around the facility, players are constantly being reminded to keep their distance, wash their hands and wear their masks.

“I feel like, here, they’re doing a great job of just having everything...Locker rooms — we got separated lockers,” Marquise Brown said. “We got monitors to track how close we are to people. They’re making it as safe as possible, and that was something that everybody was skeptical about — how it would be. But once we got here, we were like, ‘This could work.’”

Both Snead and Brown made significant changes to their bodies in quarantine, as Snead dropped seven pounds and Brown added about 20. In quarantine, there was still a sense of normalcy as both players worked out for the upcoming season. 

RELATED: Mark Ingram sees COVID-19 issues with MLB, preaches positive mindset

At the Ravens’ facility, however, with all the precautionary measures in place, there’s no real escape from how different the 2020 season is set to be. 

“You have to take these tests every day,” Snead said. “Coming in, we had to wait a week to get in the building, which was different. But once we got into the building, I could just tell the Ravens organization in itself took that next step of making sure everybody is safe. Everybody is doing everything they have to do to make sure that we are all being safe, staying clean, and just making sure that we are taking care of ourselves, at the end of the day.”

With those specific measures in place the hope is to have a full, and as normal as possible, regular season.

“I know the NFL and the NFLPA took the best steps to make sure that we can have football this year,” Snead said. “And when it comes down to it, every guy has to hold themself accountable to make sure that they’re ready for Sundays, they’re healthy for Sundays. And hopefully, we can make sure this thing goes all the way.”

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Lamar Jackson among 7 Ravens highlighted in Bill Barnwell's Hall of Fame projections

Lamar Jackson among 7 Ravens highlighted in Bill Barnwell's Hall of Fame projections

When looking back at NFL history, there's typically been an average of 50 Hall-of-Famers playing in the league any given season, amounting to only 346 total recipients of the distinguished honor. The possibility of there being seven of those legendary football figures on the Baltimore Ravens is no feat to be modest about. 

That's just the kind of season the Ravens had last season before getting upset by the Tennessee Titans in the divisional round. The high-flying offense and stifling defense injected fear into their opponents during that 12-game win streak. 

To have those teams, though, you need individual talent and the Ravens boasted it at various degrees of experience at practically every position. Categorized into groups of Locks, Likely, In The Running, and Work To Do, ESPN's Bill Barnwell projected the chances current players on each team in the NFL would become future HOFers.

For Baltimore, Lamar Jackson's 2019 MVP campaign was enough to ensure him a spot with the "In the Running" group. Despite becoming the first quarterback to ever throw for over 3,000 yards and rush for another 1,500 in his first two seasons, Jackson again underperformed in the playoffs. Had the Ravens never slipped up against the Titans and Derrick Henry's tireless legs, Jackson might be a category up along with a teammate on the defensive side of the ball. 

RELATED: VICK SAYS LAMAR JACKSON NEEDS TO IMPROVE 'PLAYOFF PLAY'

Safety Earl Thomas got the only nod from the AFC North champs to be in the (70-99%) Likely category, thanks in large part to his defining years with the Legion of Boom defense up in Seattle. 

Kicker Justin Tucker joined Jackson and cornerback Marcus Peters on the In the Running grouping, while running back Mark Ingram, tackle Ronnie Stanley and Calais Campbell all have outside chances at getting a spot in Canton. Tucker likely needs to keep performing at an elite level for another decade in order to join just the two kickers in the Hall as of now (to be surely joined by Adam Vinatieri). 

Those Ravens seven projected selections were tied for most in the NFL along with the Steelers and Saints. 

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