Redskins

Quick Links

After two seasons on IR and little production, is Paul Richardson's time over with Redskins?

After two seasons on IR and little production, is Paul Richardson's time over with Redskins?

The Redskins signed Paul Richardson in 2018 to be the deep threat the team lost when DeSean Jackson left via free agency after the 2016 season. It didn't work. 

In two years with the Redskins, Richardson has 48 catches for 507 catches and four touchdowns, and both seasons finished with trips to the injured reserve. Washington, however, paid Richardson handsomely for his work.

He signed a five-year, $40 million contract with the Redskins that guaranteed $12.5 million at signing. To date, he's made nearly $20 million despite never being the team's leading receiver. 

Next year, Richardson will carry an $8.5 million salary cap number, but the team could get $2.5 million in cap relief if he's cut while taking a $6 million cap hit. The final two seasons of his contract have no guarantees and no cap number unless he plays.

If the Redskins wait until after June 1st, 2020, to cut Richardson then the numbers flip. The team would save $6.5 million against the cap and Richardson's contract would only count $2 million against the cap. In fact, the team doesn't need to wait until summer to make the move, but rather can use the Post-June 1 designation that the NFL allows organizations to use to better their cap. This should be the obvious move. 

Considering Washington has made a youth movement at receiver, with rookies Terry McLaurin, Kelvin Harmon and Steven Sims looking like the future, Richardson looks quite expendable. Especially considering the emergence of McLaurin as a potential elite wideout, both with deep speed and route running ability. 

Redskins team president Bruce Allen signed Richardson, but it's hard to know who will be making calls for the organization in 2020. There is much speculation that Allen could be on the way out, and the team already fired head coach Jay Gruden in October. Interim head coach Bill Callahan is not expected to remain in that position next season. 

If Richardson is cut, it's hard to look at the signing as anything but a disappointment. Big money for little production. That's not winning football. 

MORE REDSKINS NEWS:

 

Quick Links

Redskins Talk live from Miami for Super Bowl week: How to watch, live stream, listen

Redskins Talk live from Miami for Super Bowl week: How to watch, live stream, listen

Before the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers play for the right to hoist the Lombardi Trophy, the Redskins Talk crew will break down the Redskins and happenings around the NFL.

JP Finlay and Mitch Tischler will welcome special guests everyday from Tuesday to Friday, live from Radio Row in Miami.

The Redskins are in the midst of a busy time, ushering in a new era under the direction of newly minted head coach Ron Rivera. With the NFL Combine, free agency and the draft right around the corner, Redskins Talk has your fix with analysis, discussion and high-profile guests. 

Here's everything you need to know.

Redskins Talk: End of Season Special

When: Every day from Tuesday, January 28, through Friday, January 31, from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Radio Row in Miami

Live Stream: Click here to watch the live stream on NBCSportsWashington.com or stream in the MyTeams App (click here to download)

TV Channel: NBC Sports Washington (Channel Finder)

Want to subscribe to Redskins Talk?: 
Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Art19

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports. Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream Capitals and Wizards games easily from your device.

MORE REDSKINS NEWS

Quick Links

Redskins' wide receiver Terry McLaurin planned NFL future in 2005 letter

Redskins' wide receiver Terry McLaurin planned NFL future in 2005 letter

Redskins wide receiver Terry McLaurin just finished his rookie season in the NFL and ranked among the best first-year pass catchers across the league in 2019. Among rookies, the Ohio State product ranked second in receptions with 59, second in receiving yards with 919 and tied for third in touchdowns with seven — all in 14 games.

That kind of production from a third-round pick may have surprised some. But for McLaurin, this was always the plan.

On Friday, McLaurin took to his Instagram story to post a letter he wrote in 2005 — when he was 10 years old — where he proclaimed his aspirations to be an NFL wide receiver.

“I really want to be a wide [receiver] and a starter,” McLaurin wrote in the letter titled ‘My Future.’ “I will play hard every game.”

McLaurin officially achieved his goal of becoming a professional wide receiver when the Redskins made him their third-round pick last April. He didn’t waste any time accomplishing the second part of his dream, cracking the starting lineup in the first game of the season against the Eagles.

In his letter, McLaurin also discussed the possibility of playing running back in the NFL. In his senior year of high school, the 2013 Indiana Mr. Football was an all-around weapon. He posted 14 total touchdowns, recorded 58 catches for 953 yards receiving and rushed for an additional 744 yards.

Ultimately, McLaurin settled into the receiver position in college when he joined the Buckeyes program. His best season came in his senior year, when he was paired with Dwayne Haskins, and caught 35 passes for 701 yards and 11 touchdowns.

Low productivity in college — just 75 career receptions — may have caused McLaurin’s fall to the third round. But now, he’s making up for it and was one of the steals of the draft.

If McLaurin’s standout numbers continue, he should have no problem accomplishing a couple other goals he laid out in the letter.

“Make lots of money and live in a big house,” a young McLaurin wrote.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports. Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream Capitals and Wizards games easily from your device.

MORE REDSKINS NEWS