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Even at 34, Adrian Peterson is still really, really good (WATCH)

Even at 34, Adrian Peterson is still really, really good (WATCH)

Redskins running back Adrian Peterson turned 34-years-old in March. But if Thursday's game is any indication, the future Hall of Fame running back has shown zero signs of his age.

On his first carry of the preseason, Peterson took an inside handoff and immediately put one of his signature jump-cuts to use, shaking Bengals safety Shawn Williams in the process.

After the initial cut, Peterson immediately bounced to the outside, finding plenty of open field to work with. He could have chosen to run out of bounds and avoid any contact whatsoever (after all, it is the preseason), but chose to stay in bounds and force the Bengals secondary to tackle him.

The end zone, bird's-eye view captures just how impressive the jump-cut and entire 26-yard run was.

The run was vintage AP, giving Redskins fans hope that the veteran still has plenty in the tank to be productive this season.

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Report: Washington, Brandon Scherff won't discuss long-term deal until after 2020 season

Report: Washington, Brandon Scherff won't discuss long-term deal until after 2020 season

Brandon Scherff has stated he wants to remain in Washington for the entirety of his career, but the guard will reportedly have to wait for a long-term extension.

Washington will wait until after the upcoming season to try and sign Scherff to a long-term deal, ESPN's John Keim reported Monday.

Scherff, 28, was franchise tagged by Washington in March and signed his tender in April. July 15 marks the final date before the 2020 season that the two sides can agree on a multi-year extension until after the season.

The news doesn't come as much of a surprise, as reports surfaced last week that it was unlikely Scherff would sign a long-term deal with the team prior to Wednesday's deadline.

RELATED: FOUR FACTORS THAT COULD PREVENT SCHERFF FROM SIGNING LONG-TERM WITH WASHINGTON

Originally the fifth overall pick by Washington in the 2015 NFL Draft, Scherff has established himself as one of the best interior offensive linemen in the NFL ever since. In his five seasons with Washington, Scherff has been named to the Pro Bowl three times.

However, the guard has had trouble staying healthy, as he's missed 13 games over the past two seasons with multiple injuries, including two season-ending trips to injured reserve. Under the tag, Scherff will earn just north of $15 million in 2020.

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Tony Kornheiser: Dan Snyder would've been latest owner to lose team had he not changed name

Tony Kornheiser: Dan Snyder would've been latest owner to lose team had he not changed name

The Washington football franchise officially announced the retirement of the name 'Redskins' and its current logo on Monday, a move that many believe was overdue.

However, the decision by Washington owner Dan Snyder to move on from the name is a complete change in course from seven years ago, when he said that he would "never" change the name.

ESPN Pardon the Interruption co-host Tony Kornheiser said on Monday that he believes that money is the reason Snyder ultimately made the decision to change the name.

"What is happening now, and the smartest man I ever met in television, Don Ohmeyer, would have predicted this, because he said the answer to all your questions is money," Kornheiser said. "Dan Snyder was going to lose money. His partners want to sell. They want to bail out."

Last week, reports surfaced that Washington's three minority owners, including FedEx CEO Fred Smith, wanted to sell their share of the team, with the trio citing they were "not happy being a partner" with Snyder. FedEx was the first public sponsor to publicly pressure Washington to change its name earlier this month.

Kornheiser then took his comments to another level, saying that he believes Snyder would have been forced out as the team's owner had he not departed from the name.

"If he had not changed this name, he would have gone down the route of Marge Schott and Donald Sterling and Jerry Richardson," Kornheiser said. "They would have said, 'You have to sell the team.'"

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For Kornheiser to compare Snyder to these three past owners, it shows the seriousness of the issue regarding the name.

Schott was forced out of owning the Cincinnati Reds after making pro-Adolf Hitler comments. Sterling was banned for life by the NBA in 2014 after racist comments about his spouse hanging out with Black people were made public. And Richardson sold his share of the Carolina Panthers in 2018 after alleged sexual misconduct towards some of his employees.

Additionally, Kornheiser said that he believes the only way Snyder was convinced to sell was after someone in the organization proposed him the question: Do you still want to own this team?

"He went absolutely kicking and screaming, and I'm sure at some point they said, 'Do you want to continue owning this team? Because if you do, that name is out,'" Kornheiser said.

RELATED: WILBON RIPS WASHINGTON'S STATEMENT, CALLING IT 'TONE-DEAF'

Of course, if that were the case, Snyder ended up prioritizing remaining the team's majority owner and changing the name, which the team formally announced Monday. 

While the name is on its way out, Kornheiser speaks for many when he believes the change is later than it should have been.

"This was a long time coming; it should have been done a long time ago as we both agree," Kornheiser said. "I think we've come to understand that most of the fans intend no slur when they use this name. But it is a slur and it is indefensible."

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