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Please realize how impressive it is that Adrian Peterson is returning for a third year with the Redskins

Please realize how impressive it is that Adrian Peterson is returning for a third year with the Redskins

What was supposed to be a miniseries is now being renewed for a third, full season.

On Wednesday, the Redskins announced they're exercising Adrian Peterson's team option for 2020, meaning the running back will return to Washington for another year in their backfield.

The natural reaction to news like that in today's sports landscape is to retweet it, or send the story to a buddy, or reflect on it for about seven seconds — and then immediately spin it forward. 

Will he start in Week 1? What does this say about Derrius Guice? Will the team still be thinking about drafting a running back? And asking questions like that is absolutely fine, since they're all worth considering.

Still, just chill for a bit before launching into what's next, because what's happened already with Peterson's Redskins career is remarkable and worth reflecting on.

When the former MVP signed with the Burgundy and Gold a few weeks before the 2018 season began, it felt completely possible that he'd be gone before even appearing in a meaningful contest. His contract was for one year and it was worth the NFL minimum. It was a total flyer for what was then a desperate offense.

But then Peterson showed his trademark burst in an exhibition matchup with the Broncos, hinting that he was no flyer. Then he posted 96 yards and a rushing touchdown in the opener in Arizona. Then two weeks later, he went off for 120 yards and two scores in a win versus the Packers.

Quickly, it became clear: The guy no one wanted was turning out to be the guy for the Redskins offense.

More highlights followed, including a 64-yard end zone visit against the Giants, a 90-yarder in Philly on Monday Night Football and a 119-yard effort in his penultimate appearance of the campaign.

All together, Peterson topped 1,000 yards for the eighth time in his career — as a 33-year-old behind an offensive line that changed constantly. So, the Redskins inked him to a two-year contract last offseason, rewarding him for his tremendous output. The expectation was that he'd share carries with Guice and Chris Thompson in 2019, helping out in more of a shared role.

Peterson, though, doesn't really abide by expectations.

After a bizarre Week 1 where then-coach Jay Gruden made No. 26 a healthy scratch, Peterson stepped in for an injured Guice and assumed the main role again. 15 starts later, the 34-year-old finished with another 898 yards and five TDs — on an even more limited offense that was without its two best blockers for the majority of its plays.

As a Redskin, he's carried the ball 462 times for 1,940 yards. He's racked up 12 rushing scores to go along with a receiving TD. The only time he's missed a game was when his head coach inexplicably deemed him not worthy of suiting up.

More often than not, a longtime, one-team legend will change uniforms late in their athletic life and quietly fade away. Their highlight reels won't feature a single clip from that final stop, pretending like it never happened. 

Peterson isn't exactly fading with the Redskins. Peterson isn't really fading at all with the Redskins, in fact. And now, the man whom Ron Rivera called the "epitome of what it means to be a pro in this league" is coming back for a third go-round.

Shortly after Washington's Wednesday announcement, Peterson tweeted at a photo of himself along with a caption that read, "Still going strong!!!" The post also featured an emoji of a fully-juiced battery.

In reality, the battery of Peterson's career is closer to 0% than it is 100%. But instead of trying to project the day when it finally runs out, sit back and enjoy what's left.

Yes, Peterson will ultimately be remembered as a Viking, but he's also giving Redskins fans plenty of memories. It feels like there's more to come, too.

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For those thinking the Redskins could go with Kyle Allen over Dwayne Haskins, consider this

For those thinking the Redskins could go with Kyle Allen over Dwayne Haskins, consider this

Kyle Allen's acquisition has led some to wonder if Dwayne Haskins is now in a true fight for the Redskins' starting quarterback job. DeAngelo Hall came out with comments saying as much last week, and his opinion is shared by a few other analysts and some fans, too.

That outcome is certainly on the table, sure, and it moves closer to the center of the table the longer Coronavirus keeps teams away from the facility. If the offseason gets cut short or erased entirely, Allen's familiarity with Scott Turner's offense goes from a very useful trait to something that could be enough for him to take the field in Week 1. 

But as long as there is some semblance of normalcy over the coming months, Haskins should be Washington's starter. You can believe that because Ron Rivera indicated that's how he himself is operating, or you can believe that because, like Chris Cooley, you think Haskins is simply the better QB.

If those two reasons aren't enough, though, consider this: Going with Haskins appears to line up with how Rivera has approached his first free agency and first campaign as the franchise's leader.

Like it or not, Rivera has mostly brought in low-cost players this March. Aside from pursuing and losing out on Amari Cooper, he and the front office seem content with just trying to make this roster more well-rounded and more competitive while the coach looks to establish his way of doing things in 2020.

Of course, Rivera, Kyle Smith and others would love to begin this new era of Redskins football by stringing together nine or 10 victories and making it into January. That said, they're all aware that they're assuming control of a 3-13 team and are at the start of a rebuild that may require a few seasons to really take effect.

In other words, this is the perfect time to let a 2019 first-rounder have a full year under center and in shotgun and allow both he and the organization to figure out if he can be a difference maker in the NFL.

If Haskins struggles, the Redskins should let him try to fight through those struggles. And if he continues to struggle, then they can finally turn to Allen. That scenario will in all likelihood lead to another unsightly record and put Washington in a spot to draft a premium signal caller in 2021. 

However — and this is weirdly a result that doesn't get mentioned enough — it could really pay off and set the Redskins up for major success under Rivera.

One of the top shorcuts to relevancy is having a quality passer on a cheap deal (and Haskins' deal has the potential to be really cheap through 2022). If the Redskins give Haskins 2020, he could give them much more in return.

Sure, if Allen entered this September as the guy, his chemistry with Turner and Rivera could make the Burgundy and Gold's record marginally better in the short term. That said, the Redskins' strategy in free agency doesn't indicate that they're too preoccupied with the short term. 

Overall, Allen is no scrub. In fact, he has produced more than Haskins has as a pro up to this point. Yet for Rivera and Co., what happens next matters far more than what's happened already.

If they're being patient with addressing their roster, they need to be patient with Haskins. They may one day be very thankful that they were.

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Redskins Free Agency Report Card: Offense fails to add difference-maker

Redskins Free Agency Report Card: Offense fails to add difference-maker

Ever since Ron Rivera took over as the Redskins head coach in early January, he has preached finding the core players on the roster in order to turn the culture around. But if the first wave of free agency proved one thing, it's that it takes a lot more than just a shakeup in the front office and a new head coach to change a culture. 

Rivera inherited an offense that played multiple rookies a season ago. Wide receiver Terry McLaurin has already established himself as a stud, while both Steven Sims and Kelvin Harmon have shown promise. Quarterback Dwayne Haskins had his growing pains in 2019 but started to finally put things together as the season concluded.

But as a whole, the Redskins offense from a year ago was really bad. They averaged just 16.6 points per game, dead last in the NFL. Only the New York Jets averaged fewer yards per game than the Burgundy and Gold.

The Redskins knew that entering free agency, the team would need to add difference-makers on offense. Someone who could help Haskins grow as a passer, but also change the entire dynamic of the offense. They tried twice, but swung and missed both times, and didn't appear to have much of a backup plan, which is why they earn a D grade on their offensive free agency report card.

On the first day of the legal tampering period, the Redskins attempted to pry away Amari Cooper from their rival Dallas Cowboys. Cooper, the best free agent wideout on the market, would have been an excellent fit in the Redskins offense. He's just 25 years old, an excellent route runner, and a go-to target for a young quarterback to look for. With McLaurin opposite him, the duo would have made a dangerous tandem on the outside.

In their first free agency together, Rivera and Redskins Senior VP of Player Personnel Kyle Smith offered the four-time Pro Bowler a massive contract with even more money than the one Dallas put forward. They were ready to make a franchise-altering investment in Cooper and have him be the crown jewel of their first free agency class. But Cooper decided to stay put and signed a five-year deal with the Cowboys, citing the ability to contend for a championship right away.

After missing on Cooper, the Redskins didn't pursue any of the next tier free agent receivers, such as Emmanuel Sanders or Robby Anderson. Instead, the lone wideout Washington has signed in free agency is Cody Latimer. A former second-round pick, Latimer has never turned in a season with more than 25 catches or 300 yards. Sure, it's a low-risk signing, but nowhere near a game-changer the Redskins desperately need.

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Entering free agency, tight end was the position the Redskins arguably needed to upgrade the most; having a solid player at the position is crucial for a young, developing quarterback like Haskins. Washington released the oft-injured Jordan Reed this offseason and Vernon Davis retired, leaving a gaping hole at the position.

The Redskins were expected to be major players for Austin Hooper, the top tight end available. But the former Falcon agreed to a four-year deal with the Cleveland Browns just minutes after players could start negotiating with teams. A few days after signing with Cleveland, Hooper told SiriusXM that he was between the Browns and the Redskins and felt Cleveland offered a better chance to win.

After missing out on Hooper, the Redskins went shopping at the bargain bin once again, signing tight ends Logan Thomas and Richard Rodgers each to a one-year deal. Over the past four seasons, Rodgers has a total of 43 catches for 438 yards. He's had multiple injuries, too, playing in just eight total games since 2017. Thomas is a converted quarterback-turned-tight-end who had a career-high 16 receptions a season ago.

The team has also added two running backs, J.D. McKissic and Peyton Barber, to compete with Adrian Peterson, Derrius Guice and maybe Bryce Love.

Once again, these are all low-risk signings. Not a ton is expected from any of them, and almost any above-average production can be seen as a bonus. But for a team that desperately needed to find another game-changer on offense, none of these players have proven to be that guy yet in the pros.

The Redskins aren't going to contend for a Super Bowl in 2020, and Rivera knows that. Rebuilds take time, and Rivera has more than earned the respect to design Washington's rebuild the way he wants. 

But the head coach has preached finding guys who he believes will be core players for years to come. And after missing out on two of the teams top targets -- Cooper and Hooper -- the Redskins have likely not signed anyone on the offensive side of the ball that fits that category.

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