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Report shows Bruce Allen won't trade Trent Williams now, but could that change?

Report shows Bruce Allen won't trade Trent Williams now, but could that change?

No practices. No games. No voluntary workouts. No mandatory workouts. No training camp. Trent Williams hasn't attended a single Redskins team event in 2019. Not one. And still he remains on the team.

NFL Network reported on Saturday morning that while the Redskins have gotten plenty of calls about the seven-time Pro Bowler Williams, Washington team president Bruce Allen has no intention to trade the left tackle.

Browns GM John Dorsey publicly admitted this week that he's been calling the Redskins about possibly trading for Williams but that it "takes two to tango." The implication being Allen isn't taking serious part in trade talks, and that coincides with the NFL Network report. 

If Allen is intent on waiting until January to trade Williams, the Redskins boss retains that power. Allen makes trades, unilaterally, and whether or not it should be the case, it remains that case. DeAngelo Hall explained on his podcast last month that he didn't expect Williams to be traded until the offseason either. Hall explained that Allen wanted to trade Williams on his own terms, and that won't happen in season. 

There could be strategic advantages to holding on to Williams this year too. If Williams doesn't play, and the Redskins trade him in January, that will leave two years on his contract. If Washington traded him now, he would have only the remainder of this season plus the 2020 season to entice bidders. There also are salary cap rollovers available if Williams doesn't play this year and the team moves on in the offseason.

It also seems kind of crazy not to trade Williams now. 

If a team needs a tackle, Williams' value won't be as high in January as it is right now. Period. The trade deadline comes on October 29th, and Williams could likely command a large asking price. Dorsey is openly talking about wanting Williams. He wouldn't do that if he didn't mean that. 

Allen has made it clear that moving on from Williams now isn't in the cards, but one source inside the Redskins Park headquarters still said he wouldn't be surprised if something happens before the deadline. But what makes that happen?

The offers might need to change. 

Think about things in the context of Allen's approach: If the Redskins are close, then players help more than draft picks. If Washington is going to give up one of their best players, or arguably their best player, then Allen might want a star player back in a trade. 

Does that offer exist? Is Allen even interested? Those answers aren't clear. 

What is clear, however, is that the Redskins made a shift towards accountability. At least that's what's been said.

The team fired Jay Gruden two weeks and moved to interim head coach Bill Callahan. Much of Callahan's message has been about increasing physicality on the field and responsibility off it. For that message to work, how can the team continue to let the Williams situation linger?

Throughout Williams' holdout, Redskins leadership has dismissed the idea of trading Williams. During training camp the word was Williams would not be traded, at all. In fact, Allen said he expected Williams to rejoin the team before the regular season started. Seven games later, no sign of Williams. 

After firing Jay Gruden two weeks ago, Allen held a press conference. Asked about trading Williams, Allen replied, "No, not at this time."

Well, last week for the first time Callahan got asked about trading Williams. It's not Callahan's call to make the trade, but the answer sounded different.

"I think you’re always looking to improve your roster by any means," the interim coach said. "Whether you’re acquiring by trade or acquiring it through free agency or obviously guys off the waiver wire, we’re always looking."

Callahan says the Redskins are always looking to improve. That means the question is what justifies improvement to Allen. 

Maybe it's not picks. Maybe it's players. The deadline comes in about nine days. Questions will be answered. 

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Dwayne Haskins says he's 'blessed' to call Alex Smith a teammate

Dwayne Haskins says he's 'blessed' to call Alex Smith a teammate

Monday marked the one-year anniversary of Redskins quarterback Alex Smith's gruesome leg injury. He broke the tibia and fibula bones in his leg Week 11 last season in a game against the Houston Texans, and after significant infections and more than a dozen surgeries, Smith finally appears on the road to recovery. 

Elizabeth Smith, Alex's wife, posted an uplifting video to Instagram documenting the quarterback's rehab to this point. Remarkably, he's running and working out again despite some reports this time last year that he might lose functionality in that leg forever. 

Tuesday morning Redskins rookie quarterback Dwayne Haskins posted to Twitter reacting to Smith's video, "This man, is one of the best people I ever been around. Blessed to be able to call him a teammate."

In the immediate months after the injury, Smith was not around the team much. He was in the hospital for a significant amount of time and then worked on his rehab. But he's been a near constant presence at Redskin Park since the summer. Smith was in Richmond for training camp, and he's been traveling with the team for road games. 

The rookie was not around last fall when the injury occurred, and since Haskins joined the team in late April, Smith has been there. 

Smith is a part of this Redskins team, and clearly Haskins views that as a resource.

That's a good tone for the rookie and the veteran to strike because on some level, the two could eventually be competing for the starting quarterback job. Smith is guaranteed more than $20 million for the 2020 season, and at this point, it seems unlikely the Redskins would release him. Perhaps an injury settlement could arrive and Smith takes a different role in the organization, but that's speculation at this point. It's also possible that Haskins puts together a string of impressive play down the stretch of the 2019 season and takes a firm hold as Redskins QB1 for 2020. 

There's also one other wrinkle for 2020 that could emerge at quarterback. With a 1-9 record, the Redskins are currently in line for the 2nd overall pick. Should LSU quarterback Joe Burrow fall to 2, or should the Redskins finish the season with the No. 1 overall pick, things could get very interesting.

For now, Redskins fans should be happy to see the relationship between an accomplished veteran like Smith and a first-round pick like Haskins. The two have much in common, being Heisman finalists and playing for Urban Meyer in college. The first overall pick in 2005, Smith knows what it takes to make it in the NFL, and that knowledge could certainly hold some value for Haskins. 

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At 1-9 and sinking, Redskins coach and players know that 'close' is just a myth

At 1-9 and sinking, Redskins coach and players know that 'close' is just a myth

Redskins team president Bruce Allen famously described his team as “close” multiple times during the last few years.

Close? Close to what?

Allen never really answered that, but in some alternate universe, there was often talk about a 6-3 record midway through the 2018 season and coulda-beens and shoulda-beens. 

“It means you’re close. It means you’re close to being better. We have to find the right ingredients and right chemistry to do that,” Allen said last January. “We were two games out of the playoffs, and no matter how you want to look at the season, we were two games out of it. And the year before we were one game out of it, and the year before we were one game out of it. So we have to find the right ingredients to get over that hump.”

Of course, none of that mattered in the real universe. Ever. 

In the time since Allen’s infamous close comments, the Redskins are 1-9, fired head coach Jay Gruden and seven-time Pro Bowl tackle Trent Williams has made clear he will never return to the organization. 

Now, however, in a fit of honesty, a top Redskins official has admitted that the team is, in fact, not close. 

"I don’t think we’re close today. I have to be honest with you,” Redskins interim head coach Bill Callahan said after his team lost 34-17 to the New York Jets on Sunday. 

Callahan provided the unnecessary qualifier that the Redskins weren’t close in the Jets game, but the reality is the Redskins aren’t close in any capacity. On Monday, the Redskins coach expanded on his comments.

"The translation is what really gets to me, taking plays from the grass to the game," Callahan said. "Nobody wants to hear it and I understand that. No one wants to hear how hard you practice and how hard you prepare because everyone does in the National Football League. You’ve got to come to the game and you’ve got to make plays. When that doesn’t translate, yeah there’s disappointment."

The coach deserves some level of credit for the honesty, but the reality absolutely backs up his sentiment. This Redskins team just don't make enough plays to validate much conversation around their proximity to real competition.

The team is not close to a competent defense, particularly after going down 34-3 to the Jets before a late two touchdown rally. 

The team is not close to an explosive offense, particularly after getting just three first downs in the entire first half against the Jets. 

The team just isn't close. 

The Redskins are 1-9 and on a solid path to a 1-15 record. It would be the worst mark in Washington since 1961. Jack Kennedy was president then. 

Even if rookie QB Dwayne Haskins improves and can lead this team to a few victories, the Redskins still won’t be close. The team lacks playmakers on offense, the offensive line has struggled much of the year, and the defense has been a mess most of the season. 

Players recognize the conversation about competing and being close isn’t accurate, and simply isn’t good enough anyway. 

“The message can't keep being, 'We're close, we're close.' The message can't be 'I'm proud of your guys' effort, get ready for next week'. We have to put points on the board, put touchdowns on the board. That's what wins at this level,” Redskins WR Paul Richardson said after a Week 9 loss in Buffalo. 

Richardson is right. Pro football isn’t about participation trophies. It’s about wins. 

For years the Redskins’ brass has talked about effort as a panacea to bad football. Effort alone won’t change anything. Effort needs to be met with capable players, and capable players also need to exert maximum effort. There’s a legitimate question how much of either the Redskins are getting. 

The only thing the Redskins are close to is their worst record in nearly 60 years. 

Close to what? Close to nothing. 

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